States with no income tax? States with no income tax? | allnurses

States with no income tax?

  1. 0 I've talked to a banker recently and found out that in some states people don't have to pay any income tax whatsoever. If I remember correctly those states include Florida, Washington, Nevada and a few others. Let's face it - paying 25% of your salary on top of other expenses like student loans, mortgages and bills is not much fun and not much money is left (we are not making millions here, right?). On the other hand, those states without income tax have other ways to compensate the difference, like high property tax and high taxes on regular purchases. I wanted to ask the nurses who live in those states without income tax if you feel like your gross income can fully compensate for higher living expenses?

    Any other opinions?
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. Visit  mtngrl profile page
    #1 3
    There is no state income tax here in TN. I do not feel the property taxes are high, at least where I live, plus I live in the county. The sales tax is what gets you here, 9.5%. But honestly it would be weird having income tax now that I have lived here for a few years.
  4. Visit  caroladybelle profile page
    #2 5
    I lived in FL and now live in a state and a city that has income tax. It also snows in the wintertime.

    I guarantee you, I make it much better financially here than I ever did in FL.

    While it might be okay to live in FL as a retiree, it is an absolutely abysmal place to work as a nurse and not that great a place to live as a working person.
  5. Visit  Emergent profile page
    #3 6
    No income tax in WA but sales tax up the yin-yang. The trick is to live near the OR border where there is the opposite -no sales tax but income tax up the wazoo. Then you can live in WA and shop in OR!
  6. Visit  mountst profile page
    #4 0
    Does TX have an income tax? I had heard FL and TX don't have. But sometimes the life is more expensive in certain areas therefore tax breaks not helping very much.
  7. Visit  christina731 profile page
    #5 0
    Quote from JNursee
    I've talked to a banker recently and found out that in some states people don't have to pay any income tax whatsoever. If I remember correctly those states include Florida, Washington, Nevada and a few others. Let's face it - paying 25% of your salary on top of other expenses like student loans, mortgages and bills is not much fun and not much money is left (we are not making millions here, right?). On the other hand, those states without income tax have other ways to compensate the difference, like high property tax and high taxes on regular purchases. I wanted to ask the nurses who live in those states without income tax if you feel like your gross income can fully compensate for higher living expenses?

    Any other opinions?
    I've lived in NV (almost) my entire life and I have always paid income tax of about 20% for legit jobs. From what I understand income taxes are federal, not state, so you should be paying them no matter where your live. We also have sales tax of 8.1% and property taxes depending on the value of your home (reasonable compared to other states). What we don't have here is state/city/county tax.
  8. Visit  RubySlippers:) profile page
    #6 2
    Those states still pay federal income tax. Just not state income tax.
  9. Visit  SouthernPoint profile page
    #7 0
    I have lived in Florida for 40+ years. I have been a tax payer for a good 25 of those years.

    Your question is extremely open and confusing.

    When you say "Income Taxes", I think Federal Income Taxes. I believe you are trying to ask about "State Income Taxes". We do not have SIT here in Florida. Our State Sales Tax is 6% on everything but food. Each county runs a little different when it comes to property taxes. Now home owners insurance will kill you if you can even get it. We are every seasonal, some areas more than others. It's hot, rainy & muggy almost 8 months out of the year, again depends where you live. I live near the swamp in the deep south of Florida.

    Hope that helps.
  10. Visit  MunoRN profile page
    #8 2
    As others have said you would still pay federal income taxes. You also still pay state taxes, just in a different form, mainly in sales and excise taxes. States that don't have a state income tax still have to get basically the same revenue, they'll just get it from you in a different way.
  11. Visit  hope3456 profile page
    #9 0
    Last edit by hope3456 on Jul 12, '14
  12. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    #10 2
    Quote from nurseappreciate
    Does TX have an income tax? I had heard FL and TX don't have. But sometimes the life is more expensive in certain areas therefore tax breaks not helping very much.
    I have lived in TX since 2005 and there are no state income taxes here.

    However, if you are a homeowner, the property taxes here are higher than the national average. In addition, the sales tax is 8 percent.
  13. Visit  JNursee profile page
    #11 0
    Ok, I see what you mean guys. I've only been living in the US for a few years and even though we pay taxes, I don't really know how they separate it into state and federal. Also, the accountant confused me because he said "if you make, for example, 80k a year, you are keeping the whole amount and not paying anything". This phrase made me think that there are no taxes at all to be paid in those states. I was surprised and thought why would people ever want to live anywhere else lol
  14. Visit  amoLucia profile page
    #12 0
    There's info on google. Some states defer federal, some defer state, some defer both. Some states have state sales tax, some don't. Some places have other different taxes they collect.

    I was thinking - taxes fund some services, so if a tax is deferred what service is not provided. I had a friend in New Hampshire - there were no municipal service like garbage collection. Residents had to pack up their trash and drive to the municipal dump to dispose of it. Not fun if you're elderly or in bad NH weather.

    I get a kick out of 'city taxes'. I worked one place and they called it 'privilege tax'. I guess that I was privileged to work in that community.

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