States that do NOT require CEU's for renewal... - page 2

The thread about the late license renewal got me thinking about the requirements for renewal of your RN or LPN license. Indiana does not require that nurses have CEU's to renew their licenses....Is... Read More

  1. by   Love-A-Nurse
    mississippi doesn't require ceus either.
  2. by   imenid37
    md did not when i lived there. pa was mentioned above and it doesn't. florida does.
  3. by   ernurse728
    No CEU in MD
  4. by   susanmary
    Connecticut does not require CEUs for RN license renewal.
  5. by   P_RN
    South Carolina doesn't either.
  6. by   Sally_ICURN
    I had NO idea that so many states didn't require continuing education!! So do nurses do it on their own? Are they required to meet certain educational requirements by their employer? What motivates a nurse to seek learning opportunities? Where I work not only does my employer pay for class fees, they provide me the paid time off to go to those classes. Part of being a professional is maintaining or furthering one's knowledge base which in turn furthers the profession's body of knowledge.

    I get in at least 8 day long classes a year--well over the required CEU's to renew my license. It is required in CA. If it were up to me, I wouldn't have it any other way!

    Sorry, but I guess I'm just shocked!
  7. by   murmar
    These states require CEU'S:
    AL,Alaska,CA,DE,FL,IA,KS,KY,LA,MA,MI,Military,MN,N E,NV,NH,NM,OH,UT,TX,WVA, and WY.
  8. by   Brita01
    Louisiana doesn't for LPNs.
  9. by   P_RN
  10. by   Stargazer
    Originally posted by Sally_ICURN
    I had NO idea that so many states didn't require continuing education!! So do nurses do it on their own? Are they required to meet certain educational requirements by their employer? What motivates a nurse to seek learning opportunities? Where I work not only does my employer pay for class fees, they provide me the paid time off to go to those classes. Part of being a professional is maintaining or furthering one's knowledge base which in turn furthers the profession's body of knowledge.

    I get in at least 8 day long classes a year--well over the required CEU's to renew my license. It is required in CA. If it were up to me, I wouldn't have it any other way!

    Sorry, but I guess I'm just shocked!
    I agree that continuing ed is important--just because it's not required doesn't mean that nobody goes. The classes I want to attend always sell out, so I have to sign up early.

    I also have to do a lot of on-the-job learning. Just to give you one example, when we had the anthrax mailings after 9/11, I had to go online for 2 days and find the most up-to-date information I could find, write a summary for all the senior executives, and teach a class to the mailroom staff on how to handle mail safely. A large portion of my job involves researching and evaluating new drugs and equipment and writing clinical protocols, which again means my info has to be as up-to-the-minute as possible. Not all CE comes from formal classes.
  11. by   Love-A-Nurse
    originally posted by sally_icurn
    i had no idea that so many states didn't require continuing education!! so do nurses do it on their own? are they required to meet certain educational requirements by their employer? what motivates a nurse to seek learning opportunities? where i work not only does my employer pay for class fees, they provide me the paid time off to go to those classes. part of being a professional is maintaining or furthering one's knowledge base which in turn furthers the profession's body of knowledge.

    i get in at least 8 day long classes a year--well over the required ceu's to renew my license. it is required in ca. if it were up to me, i wouldn't have it any other way!

    sorry, but i guess i'm just shocked!
    i was shocked too when i didn't need them for ms as i needed them for my home state.

    the place where i worked still had in-house in-service/up-dates to keep one abreast.
  12. by   WashYaHands
    I spoke with a woman who sat on our board of nursing and this is how she explained it. Verifying CEU's for more that 40,000 nurses in a state takes a lot of manpower and paperwork and this costs money. Since nursing registration fees are the source of income for the BON, this equates into higher registration fees. Rather than charge nurses astronomical registration fees, our BON decided to do away with CEU's to keep the cost down. Also, they believe that nurses are professionals. As professionals we should be seeking out continuing education opportunities on our own to enhance individual practice. The BON felt (based on research) that many nurses will acquire CEU's whether or not the BON mandates it, so they didnt feel the need to micro manage this activity. In addition, most major hospitals require CEU's for employment, so monitoring CEU credits at two levels was unnecessary.

    Linda
  13. by   Sally_ICURN
    Thanks for the replies to my post. I never really had any doubt that nurses who's states do not require CE's do conscientiously seek learning opportunities to add to their repertoire of knowledge. And the more I think about it, the more I think of the nurses that I know who wait until the last minute before their license is due for renewal and sign up for the most convenient or uncomplicated class just to get the units required.

    Maybe it's better to give nurses the freedom, without the pressure of licensure, to advance their knowledge in areas that truely interest them? But how does our profession document this important aspect of nursing's professional contribution to healthcare if it's not kept track of by our BON's?

    Perhaps continuing ed. is one thing that should be universal about nursing. After all, in the ANA's "Nursing's Code of Ethics," #5 states: The nurse maintains competence in nursing, and #7 states: The nurse participates in activities that contribute to the ongoing development of the profession's body of knowledge. And then there's the "ACN Nurses Code for Nurses" that states: The nurse carries personal responsibility for nursing practice and for maintaining competence by continual learning, and The nurse is active in developing a core of professional knowledge. How do we prove that we do these things? To be taken seriously, shouldn't we be uniform in the enforcement of our codes of ethics? I think it makes us look a little wishy-washy in a professional's world. Physician's and I think even Pharmacists are required to prove continuing education. I think nurses should be as well.

    Never thought about this before. Thanks for the thought-provoking subject even though I'm sure this thread started out being just a simple question! I didn't mean to complicate it!

    ~Sally
    Last edit by Sally_ICURN on Jan 21, '03

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