Starting new job, no overtime allowed?

  1. 0
    I never thought I would be complaining about this when my previous nursing job had so much mandatory overtime it seemed ALL I did was work and sleep. I would wake up to check on beeping IV pumps. But now Im starting a new job, pending my work visa, and they absolutely do not allow overtime. Im not too sure how I feel about this...Ive fallen real far behind financially lately and was hoping to be able to kick butt and make up for all of it, all to be told its company policy to have no overtime. Apparently they realized that nurses were overworked, burnt out, and that it was more expensive to find replacements, so they eliminated OT altogether. Some of you Im sure are just yelling out the AMENs! Im just upset I wont be able to get back on my feet as quick as I hoped.
    Now the problem is that Im going to be working with a TN visa. My understanding is that this visa is good specifically with one job, one employer. Is there any way anyone can suggest to get more work? Anyone know if I can get more than one TN Visa for more than one job? Like maybe get some agency work PRN?
  2. 2,375 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 13 Comments so far...

  4. 3
    With all the hype related to fatigue and performance, the only factor that has been clearly implicated in an increased risk for errors, injuries, etc is OT. Considering Hospitals can actually save some money by having Nurses work OT, I give any hospital credit if they're willing to do away with it.
  5. 0
    There's no overtime anywhere...reason being is cost. Hospitals are getting less reimbursement from Medicare and Medicaid, and the government no longer funds the hospitals for treating illegals. This country is 16 trillion in debt and rising...The money that the government does distribute among healthcare is all on borrowed money, and eventually it will come to an end. This isn't something that is going to come and go like it did back in the early 90's...this economic devastation is world wide and will have enormous consequences. Don't believe me? Follow what is happing in Europe right now...when Europe finally collapses in financial debt, America will be next loosing trillions of dollars in the economy. Still don't' believe me? Over the last 15 months, the United States has borrowed 1.5 trillion dollars...that is the government's estimate, which is always lower than reality. Most economist will tell you the US has actually borrowed 5 trillion...come on people, let's face reality about what's really happening to this nation of ours. Instead, CNN and Fox News had the Queens Jubilee Day covered all day today. Really?!!

    The US GDP to debt is at 100%...We have consumed more debt than spain, portugal, italy, greece, and ireland combined. We really need to open our eyes and stop living in this dream world that everything will continue to go on as it was a decade ago when people were making money and the government was prosperous. We are no longer that nation anymore, and the signs are right before our eyes...and yet we choose ignorantly to continue on blindly. It's going to hit us hard, very hard, and people are going to be shocked and confused when it does.
    Last edit by dh07RN on Jun 4, '12
  6. 2
    Quote from MunoRN
    With all the hype related to fatigue and performance, the only factor that has been clearly implicated in an increased risk for errors, injuries, etc is OT. Considering Hospitals can actually save some money by having Nurses work OT, I give any hospital credit if they're willing to do away with it.
    This.

    Nurses so often shoot themselves in the foot, but they feel it is somehow different because it is their mouth on the trigger instead of a finger.

    At facilities where OT is common/mandated, everyone drones on and on about safety and how they have no time for a life at home. Then take the OT away and watch how suddenly the tune changes to needing better pay or staffing. This isn't directed at the OP, its just a trend I've witnessed.

    Me, I firmly believe it is better to limit OT. Too many people abuse it and work themselves to the point where just staying awake during each shift requires intervention from their higher power. In the end, what you are left with is a nurse that requires too much support from their co-workers, so much so that it would have been about the same for them to have just stayed at home.

    Me, I'd rather work where OT is not allowed or is severely limited. My current facility allows it, but with many stipulations.

    To the OP: Don't look a gift horse in the mouth. Id take the opportunity to reevaluate my living expenses and figure out how to live within the means a full time position allows me. Heck, I will be cancelling my cable soon because I had to do just that and it was the least necessary bill I could find. Many veteran nurses will tell you OT is poisonous and no matter how good it seems in the short term, in the long run it is addictive and harmful.

    We all float down here.
    Rags2Riches RN and Altra like this.
  7. 0
    I too wish I could get an hour or two of O/T a week, but ours has been taken away. In fact they promise to write up those who still get it. I know there were those who abused it, but for me I really need it to get all of my work done some weeks. Oh well. I have learned that some things just have to wait until the next shift.
  8. 0
    Quote from xoemmylouox
    I too wish I could get an hour or two of O/T a week, but ours has been taken away. In fact they promise to write up those who still get it. I know there were those who abused it, but for me I really need it to get all of my work done some weeks. Oh well. I have learned that some things just have to wait until the next shift.
    And/or you could just do what makes you most comfortable and let them talk on and on about how its not allowed.

    The hospital I left not too long ago allowed OT if you were covering a hole in the schedule, but got their panties in a bunch if you were staying late. They sent out so many emails and posted so many notices about how they'd write up and terminate anyone who did not clock out on time.......it turned into absolute white noise.

    Time went on and the worst culprits stayed. One nurse would stay an hour every single day she worked. And I mean EVERY DAY. No write ups ever occurred, and she stayed employed.

    The most important thing a nurse can learn is: Know when to listen to admin/management and when to just pretend you are listening.

    We all float down here.
  9. 0
    We went through a time when there was no overtime allowed either. And, although that restriction has eased along with the economy, during that "no overtime" period, we were simply made to work short when there were no employees available that were not going into overtime. So, although nurses overworking themselves with too much OT may be a cause of poor patient outcomes, so can short staffing in the name of cost-cutting. So you may want to make sure of ratios in your job (if two nurses call in on a Saturday, and everyone else has worked their hours for the week, do you simply work 2 nurses down?)
  10. 0
    I work PRN at a facility which doesn't allow OT, and they are really anal about it. The nurses hear from the NM if they are even a few minutes over, which I feel is overkill. That's about the worst thing I can say about the place, though, so not a huge thing in the big picture.
  11. 0
    To clarify, my employer is a home care agency, so I dont know if its really a matter of filling holes. We have our regular patients, its 12-hour shifts with those patients in their home. The only time I can see having to stay late is if the person replacing us might show up later than planned, but since I havent yet had a conversation with the scheduling manager, I dont know what to expect. I was simply promised full time, and I know that that is a pretty big deal with the current economy, so to quote someone who responded to me, I am NOT looking the gift horse in the mouth. I am very happy to have found full time work at all, especially since I am coming in through a work visa. I come from a healthcare culture where mandatory overtime is common. I was lucky to be part of agency staffing, so I was never forced to do it. However, now that Ive been out of work for so long, I was just hoping to be able to get back on my feet quicker. Its probably just a mixed blessing though. I wont be able to pay back debts as fast as I would have liked, but Ill be able to spend more time watching my infant daughter grow. I guess I just wondered if this was becoming more common in America. Thanks for the input!
  12. 0
    I complain to the NJ Division and fair wage. I had an employer that said she did not give overtime no matter what. This was back in the late 8o's. I complain to the division and got every penny of over time she owe me. I don't know if it is still a law or not.


Top