staffing tried to trick/bully me in today! - page 7

I just finished dealing with staffing. I received a very angry call. "Where are you. You are scheduled to work today. You have to come in". I explained that my copy of my work hours says I'm off,... Read More

  1. by   Jessy_RN
    That is such a shame. Aside from all that, they treated you badly. They made it seem that you were irresponsible. That really leaves a good impression about them to you :stone
  2. by   nightmare
    If we are short our manager usually tries to grab some random day worker to do the night shift with the consiquence that you have someone who has worked half a day before they come in at nine.By the time we get to 0600 to start the early round they are shattered! Then you find that the permenent night staff were not even asked if they could do an extra night.Its anything for an easy life for him !
    I have caller ID and,especially in winter,always check if its work calling before I answer or get one of the kids to answer.I really hate it when he tries to pressurise me into working on my days off but I just say NO as long as I've done my contracted hours theres nothing he can do about it.By the by what are long pay periods and short pay periods that some of you refer to?
  3. by   mattsmom81
    Ya know all this scrambling for staff could be remedied simply by having a solid pool of float nurses available. If facilities made sure these nurses get a good orientation, are rewarded monetarily for their flexibility and these nurses are treated well, hospitals would have no further problem with staffing IMHO.
  4. by   Mulan
    Quote from mattsmom81
    Ya know all this scrambling for staff could be remedied simply by having a solid pool of float nurses available. If facilities made sure these nurses get a good orientation, are rewarded monetarily for their flexibility and these nurses are treated well, hospitals would have no further problem with staffing IMHO.
    I always enjoy your posts.

    I mean this in the nicest possible way, but there is no way I would want to be in the float pool at the hospital I go to. They require a certain number of hours, certain number of weekends, certain number of off shifts, floating to all the horrible floors, and being overloaded each shift as they staff according to room numbers and one always has enough work for at least two people to do. After the last impossible time that I worked, a nightmare, I am seriously thinking, and I mean seriously, of applying to Walmart.
  5. by   TNnursejane
    I work in a small town just north of a metropolitan area. The hospitals are all so competative that nurses would go PRN and have two or three different hospitals they would work at . Float pools used to work until everyone started coming up with so much more money that nurses had two or three hospitals they were working at and couldn't fill all the needs. We're back to nurses working overtime. Now hospitals are going back to hiring only full-time and part time nurses. In the 20 yrs or so that I've been a nurse, it goes in cycles.
  6. by   apaisRN
    Quote from mattsmom81
    Ya know all this scrambling for staff could be remedied simply by having a solid pool of float nurses available. If facilities made sure these nurses get a good orientation, are rewarded monetarily for their flexibility and these nurses are treated well, hospitals would have no further problem with staffing IMHO.
    I don't think my facility has any better luck finding float pool nurses than they do staff nurses. As you say, better compensation, training and respect would go a long way.
  7. by   debRN0417
    Quote from batmik
    Sounds like we could all do a commercial for our local phone companies showing another good reason for caller ID. :chuckle

    I have been off the last week and have been called 6 out of 7 days to come in and work. Most of those days I was actually not home but on a couple I saw my caller ID and didn't answer.
    I can relate. Once I was gone on vacation for two weeks and when I came home there were 12 calls for me to come to work....they KNEW I was out of state...but called anyway...duhhhhhhhhh
  8. by   barefootlady
    I can remember a time when working the float pool was a good job. The nurses who worked this pool were trained on 2 possibily 3 units. They had a set schedule, they were known on the unit and by the doctors. They worked one of these units as needed, pay was a little more, but there was no real dumping. The supervisors made rounds at least twice a day, they asked all of the nurses, but especially the floats, if there were any problems they needed help with. Admits were rotated through staff, lunches were covered, nurses even got breaks. I know, I worked the float pool for 2 years and really liked it. I agree with MattsMom, instead of the present theory of put a warm body there, it should go back to a good orientation, a little more pay, a feeling of appreciation for the nurse who can do peds today, med/surg tomorrow, ortho the next day, and maybe even a little tramatic brain, or peritoneal dialysis when asked nicely and a bonus given. Like I said, this was years ago and the facility that did this the best appreciated the nurses and the nurses did a good job for the facility. All of that changed when a new CEO came in with the "healthcare is a business" attitude. Float pool was abolished, all staff had to be assigned to floors, but funny thing happen, some days there were not enough nurses to cover and there was no one to call. Seems like when the float pool was abolished, some of the nurses decided to travel, quit, or go to the one unit but really cut their hours. I miss the old days and some of the old ways. All of it was not bad.
  9. by   P_RN
    Two good things we had.

    1. the Boss would email a spreadsheet of the schedule to everyone who needed it. She'd also photocopy it for the ones who didn't have internet access. The permanent one was behind a glass case...no slips of the pen unless by her. Any changes were given the nurse in writing. And no...they hardly ever guilted me to come in..We did self staffing so no floating and no borrowing a float.

    The 2nd thing is when I had dial-up I got a second line. It's $11/mo. The ONLY group who had that number was work. If that phone rand it was either a wrong number or WORK. So turn the bell down really low.

    I did go in for a train wreck, and a fire...both handled splendidly before I arrived. Got paid a whole shift.
  10. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from barefootlady
    I can remember a time when working the float pool was a good job. The nurses who worked this pool were trained on 2 possibily 3 units. They had a set schedule, they were known on the unit and by the doctors. They worked one of these units as needed, pay was a little more, but there was no real dumping. The supervisors made rounds at least twice a day, they asked all of the nurses, but especially the floats, if there were any problems they needed help with. Admits were rotated through staff, lunches were covered, nurses even got breaks. I know, I worked the float pool for 2 years and really liked it. I agree with MattsMom, instead of the present theory of put a warm body there, it should go back to a good orientation, a little more pay, a feeling of appreciation for the nurse who can do peds today, med/surg tomorrow, ortho the next day, and maybe even a little tramatic brain, or peritoneal dialysis when asked nicely and a bonus given. Like I said, this was years ago and the facility that did this the best appreciated the nurses and the nurses did a good job for the facility. All of that changed when a new CEO came in with the "healthcare is a business" attitude. Float pool was abolished, all staff had to be assigned to floors, but funny thing happen, some days there were not enough nurses to cover and there was no one to call. Seems like when the float pool was abolished, some of the nurses decided to travel, quit, or go to the one unit but really cut their hours. I miss the old days and some of the old ways. All of it was not bad.
    I believe this was part of their plan...a way to begin their 'business' of short staffing us. But the poor treatment and working conditions they create has backfired on them...they have caused their own 'shortage' of nurses.

    It all goes back to treat the nurses well and they'll come.

    I worked pool/prn much of my nursing career and enjoyed staying out of the unit politics. Same thing with agency. But...like other posters have mentioned, its a whole different attitude out there now. Pool, agency and float nurses DO get dumped on terribly today. Too many staff nurses are just so burned out they dump whenever they can...its really sad. I too can remember when I was treated well and appreciated as both an agency nurse and a prn/pool nurse, but the last few years I practiced were rough to say the least. The dog eat dog atmosphere is really hard to take on top of the sheer difficulties of the job.
  11. by   kadokin
    Quote from luv2quilt:)
    I bet I can top that, how about showing up for your shift as a nurse and being told you are working as a CNA for the shift? it happens where I work.
    This has happened to me on a few occassions. I have never minded, as I am given RN pay for working as an aid. It is pretty sweet to have a very task oriented 8 hours and let someone else run the show and take the tough responsibilities. And if they need me to perform some RN tasks, I'll help out, as I said, I was being compensated as an RN. This hasn't happened much lately as most of the power-hungry RNs that used to be here have retired. When I am given an extra RN, I always use them as such, though. Sorry, but I feel it is better to get the best value for the dollar out of our staffing and I feel the more RNs we have working, the better off our patients will be. No disrespect to the wonderful LPNs and CNAs I work with, but there are some tasks that only an RN can do, by law or common practice, and if we share the load, our pt's get more focused care. I'm not really sure, but I don't think they can get by w/giving you CNA pay if you are an RN. Anyone out there familiar w/the legality? As for the low down tactics of some staffing personnel out there, don't put up w/it. I am in agreement w/the previous posters who advocate the "no means no" approach. That is YOUR time off. Maybe admin will get the message and look through that pile of resumes on their desk if enough of us claim our personal time as our own instead of sacrificing ourselves on the altar of "duty". There's responsibility and there's masochism, we owe it to ourselves to know the difference!
  12. by   LPN1974
    Quote from kadokin
    This has happened to me on a few occassions. I have never minded, as I am given RN pay for working as an aid. It is pretty sweet to have a very task oriented 8 hours and let someone else run the show and take the tough responsibilities. And if they need me to perform some RN tasks, I'll help out, as I said, I was being compensated as an RN. This hasn't happened much lately as most of the power-hungry RNs that used to be here have retired. When I am given an extra RN, I always use them as such, though. Sorry, but I feel it is better to get the best value for the dollar out of our staffing and I feel the more RNs we have working, the better off our patients will be. No disrespect to the wonderful LPNs and CNAs I work with, but there are some tasks that only an RN can do, by law or common practice, and if we share the load, our pt's get more focused care. I'm not really sure, but I don't think they can get by w/giving you CNA pay if you are an RN. Anyone out there familiar w/the legality? As for the low down tactics of some staffing personnel out there, don't put up w/it. I am in agreement w/the previous posters who advocate the "no means no" approach. That is YOUR time off. Maybe admin will get the message and look through that pile of resumes on their desk if enough of us claim our personal time as our own instead of sacrificing ourselves on the altar of "duty". There's responsibility and there's masochism, we owe it to ourselves to know the difference!

    If you are performing tasks, as you say, that only an RN can do, and you are in actuality an AIDE, you are practicing nursing without a license.
    That's illegal.

    I've read your post several times, I hope I'm misreading what you're saying.
    Last edit by LPN1974 on May 16, '05
  13. by   PicklesRN
    LPN...

    >>If you are performing tasks, as you say, that only an RN can do, and you are in actuality an AIDE, you are practicing nursing without a license.
    That's illegal.<<

    She's an RN working as an Aide on a PRN basis w/RN pay.

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