Staff Retention

  1. As most who read my postings know I have been having a hard time of it lately at work. New and insane staffing grid, political BS, and just the usual garbage we all get heaped on us at one time or another but seeming to come in megadoses these days. Well the nurses at my hospital are leaving in droves, some with 6 and 7 years seniority. Not the top of the totem pole by any means but 6 or 7 years is a well seasoned staff member. Well to answer the crisis, management decided to give what we were told was to be an across the board raise. This was to retain staff as other hospitals in the area are offereing wages that are significantly higher, meaning people who work nights at my hospital are going to other hospitals to work days and they aren't losing a penny even with the shift differential! Well, today I got my "big raise". A whopping .49cents an hour! Gee kids we can buy another bag of chips in the groceries!

    I should however count myself lucky (but you know I don't)as some nurses who have been there for much longer than me are getting NOTHING! How is this for a slap in the face?! Our nurse manager is calling us all into her office, one at a time to present us with this "great news". I looked at her and I laughed! I told her that this was an insult compared to what we were promised, and that it doesn't even come close to bringing us up to the same pay scale as the other hospitals in town. She agreed with me. She said she didn't blame anyone for leaving. I am surprised she stopped short of handing us all life jackets.

    None of us asked for this pay raise. The concensus was "give us decent staffing and we'd stay". To be presented with this "bonus", and still the lousy staffing is like a slap in the face though. I think that this is going to be just enough to piss off the others who were simply biding their time to see what this new raise would mean before they turned in their resignations. 49 cents!! Whatever shall I do with this windfall? I have a great idea but can't print it here.

    I just had to let this out! I am fuming over it!
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  2. 26 Comments

  3. by   LLDPaRN
    Bunky
    I know what you mean about administration using a "band-aid" approach to fixing the staffing situation. I work per diem at a hospital in our area (which is one of the better staffed in our area, believe me)and they just gave raises to the full-time, per diem and weekend staff. For the full timers (which is what I will be at the end of the month) the raise amounts to a whopping 3%! We're not even talking a $1/hour raise! Of course administration thinks they're being so "generous"!(HA!) Is it feasible for you to leave your current situation? How much "better" is it at the neighboring hospitals? Even though the pay may be better at the rival hospitals, how is the staffing? Just something to think about. Good luck to you!

    -L
  4. by   bunky
    Hi LLPDaRN. Despite the promises I am not falling for the idea that the staffing is any better anywhere else. The pay however is. I have to consider that. If I am going to work my tail off, why not go for the gold at least? I told my nurse manager as much. I have feelers out and an interview any time I want it.

    Don't they get it? I mean don't they understand that throwing pennies at us like we are a bunch of stupid dogs ready to lunge at their leftovers is a slap in the face? I think it just creates it's own sense of hostility and takes moral to a new low. No one is grateful for this type of an "across the board raise" as it was touted. They have only suceeded in insulting us at a time where they've already done injury.
  5. by   justanurse
    You know, bunky, if I didn't know the state I live in isn't Texas, I'd almost swear we work at the same place. Almost. For years we got measly raises 40-60 cents/hour and we've had people leaving for several years. New hires would stay just long enough to be trained, and then leave for the competition across town. Last year when they gave little raises (the hospital across town always gives one a little bigger), they had a couple of nurses turn in their resignations. They offered these two a larger raise to try to get them to stay, they didn't bite, they left anyway.

    But, there is one exception. My employer finally gave the RN's a decent raise. Between charging differential and an increase in my base pay (after 14 years), I got a ~$5 raise this summer (based on experience, certifications, etc). Too bad all the other sh** still happens. They still didn't learn it though, they left EVERYONE else out entirely. So, although the RN's are happier (not happy, but happier), the rest of the staff is pissed, and rightfully so. We just got done with our evaluations this month and I can't wait to see what kind of "bonus" and raise we'll get next month. Although, being down to a one income family, the raise really does help. And, I can take the abuse a little better, with better pay and knowing that no income is an even worse possibility.

    Remember, bunky, I said almost. Keep up the good work. I'd tell you to come work with me, we at least get paid a little better. But, not nearly as good as some of the wages I've seen quoted on here.
  6. by   bunky
    It does sound similar doesn't it Justanurse. The thing about it all that really ticks me off is that I think that they shouldn't have even given us this raise! If they couldn't afford to do it right, then just don't do it. This is much too little way too late.
  7. by   Jo_deye_yuh
    bunky~

    Sounds like when I used to waitress (to get through nursing school). Some joker left me a dime for a tip. HA, I don't think sew pardner!...I marched right out to him as he was getting into his new Dodge pick-up truck, and knocked on his window. I said to him, "Sir, you forgot your change." He snickered and said, "Nah, that's your tip." I dropped it into his vehicle like a slot machine and said, "Nope, here ya go...obviously you need it more than I to help pay for your nice new truck...my Gremlin is already paid for." (I didn't own a Gremlin, it just sounded good to say at the time!) What an insult! Thanks but no, our customary 3% cost of living increase is considered our raise. Humpf...I think I averaged better $$ handling greasy plates than I do handling human lives. "Would you like a side of hash browns with that bag of LR?" ha ha

    If it is worth anything...I value you and your talents and caring. Hang in there!
    ~Jodie
  8. by   spitfire
    BUNKY AND EVERYONE, MAYBE IT IS PAST TIME TO CALL THE TEAMSTERS AND THINK ABOUT UNIONIZING OR WHO EVER PROMOTES UNIONS FOR NURSES IN YOUR AREA.IT SOUNDS AS THOUGH IT IS TIME TO HAVE A SAY IN YOUR PROFESSION. spitfire
  9. by   normarae
    Originally posted by bunky:
    As most who read my postings know I have been having a hard time of it lately at work. New and insane staffing grid, political BS, and just the usual garbage we all get heaped on us at one time or another but seeming to come in megadoses these days. Well the nurses at my hospital are leaving in droves, some with 6 and 7 years seniority. Not the top of the totem pole by any means but 6 or 7 years is a well seasoned staff member. Well to answer the crisis, management decided to give what we were told was to be an across the board raise. This was to retain staff as other hospitals in the area are offereing wages that are significantly higher, meaning people who work nights at my hospital are going to other hospitals to work days and they aren't losing a penny even with the shift differential! Well, today I got my "big raise". A whopping .49cents an hour! Gee kids we can buy another bag of chips in the groceries!

    I should however count myself lucky (but you know I don't)as some nurses who have been there for much longer than me are getting NOTHING! How is this for a slap in the face?! Our nurse manager is calling us all into her office, one at a time to present us with this "great news". I looked at her and I laughed! I told her that this was an insult compared to what we were promised, and that it doesn't even come close to bringing us up to the same pay scale as the other hospitals in town. She agreed with me. She said she didn't blame anyone for leaving. I am surprised she stopped short of handing us all life jackets.

    None of us asked for this pay raise. The concensus was "give us decent staffing and we'd stay". To be presented with this "bonus", and still the lousy staffing is like a slap in the face though. I think that this is going to be just enough to piss off the others who were simply biding their time to see what this new raise would mean before they turned in their resignations. 49 cents!! Whatever shall I do with this windfall? I have a great idea but can't print it here.

    I just had to let this out! I am fuming over it!
    I am getting chest pain just reading your message. How about 18 yrs experience in Perioperative nursing,BSN CNOR ONC RNFA, 1 year at a corporation owned hospital and received 49cent raise plus was terminated 3 weeks later because I had too much experience for the new manager and she "felt uncomfortable" working with me. The apparent trend of this hospital is fire the experienced and hire the inexperienced.
    Their HR office is like a revolving door.



    ------------------
  10. by   bunky
    Thanks for the words of support guys. Spitfire Texas is a right to work state, so there are no unions here- in fact I could be fired for even discussing the idea. Sounds like a great set up for big business doesn't it?! Yes siree, free enterprise at it's finest.
  11. by   Patricia Smith
    Hey Bunky! Are you sure this isn't Phoenix we are talking about?!? We too are a "right to work" state--but do you truly know what that means? Having attempted to start a union movement in Phoenix 3 years ago I am inclined to pass on all the things I have learned. Being a "right to work" state does NOT mean NO UNIONS...what it means simply is this. California for example--if you worked at any of the Kaiser facilites, you would "have to" join the union in order to be employed there. In a "right to work" state, if your facility was unionized, you would have the "right to work" WITHOUT joining the union--THAT is the only difference in a right to work state. Of course, hospital administrators use "right to work" as if we have NO right to work (making people believe you CANNOT have a union there)--Nothing could be further from the truth! WE all have the "right to organize". The nurse who wrote about being terminated due to her being over-qualified--I would have marched myself to the Labor Board so quickly---(by the way, you DO NOT pay for this service)! We are educated, strong, driven women! We need to help each other in these termulous times--Please know there are reporting agencies out there--we just need to stop being so afraid to use them! Good Luck Sisters!
  12. by   iamme457
    Looks like the administrators are using the same old cure..Mass enema
    Let the old out and bring in the new.
    Worked in the past
    they figure it will work now too
    Maybe yes/ maybe no
    Deanna
  13. by   Mijourney
    Hi bunky,
    As your post and other posters have indicated, nothing has changed in nursing pertaining to staff retention. In the past, I would hear nurse managers publicly announce, "nurses are a dime a dozen." Yeah, the manager got the dime and we got the dozen, of patients that is. That statement was always a great morale booster, ha, ha. You know nothing has changed much when nurses such as yourself announce a raise from shelled peanuts to unshelled peanuts. Did the hospital have to sacrifice any services or, more importantly, any major administrative salaries to give you, er uh, your raise? Perhaps the nurse manager for your unit had to reconfigure the budget. Wonder what she had to cut? Sarcasm aside, I agree that frontline unity in some form is what is needed to combat the untoward effects of change or more accurately, the retention of the status quo among the "powerless."
  14. by   PPL
    Bunky, Bunky, Bunky, what DID you do with your 49 cents???

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