Staff pretending to use empty hand sanitizer in MRSA room. - page 2

I had a MRSA patient, and really nice woman yesterday. The hand sanitizer was empty in her room, so as I headed over to the sink, she said "Oh yeah, it's empty, I know because I was using it myself".... Read More

  1. by   ebear
    Dusk,
    Well then, they need to be in that patient's room. They also need to discuss the situation (handwashing) with the nurses on the unit and the housekeeping dept. (just my .02) And I hope to God this does not result in another stupid check list!!!
    Last edit by ebear on Nov 6, '07
  2. by   walk6miles
    Excuse me but I am confused.... I thought we removed gown, mask, gloves in the room - then washed our hands for the required time (twinkle, twinkle little star, etc.)... then, after leaving the room use the hand sanitizer outside the patient's room? I swear I was in class the day they taught hand washing!!!!


    My complaint about MRSA patients is with their families: I have made a pain of myself with visitors over and over and over by reminding them that the masks and gloves are disposed of (as well as the gowns) IN THE ROOM; they must wash their hands before leaving the room and this is why:

    Visitor A goes into MRSA room and comes out, leaves accessories/souvenirs (aka gown,gloves,mask) in the nearest basket or on my chair (really rattles my chain to see that) then goes unwashed hands to visitor's lounge where they sit on the couch or put their hands on the arm chairs arms - now, bear with me - Visitor B arrives in lounge to visit mother who is recovering from abd surgery.... sits in chair, puts hands on chair arms and voila! now has MRSA to carry into Momma's room ... hugs and kisses Momma and let me look at your belly...ohhh that looks like it hurts.... let me help you pull your gown back down over your sutured, open-to-air wound....

    Visitor B arrives 3 days later and guess what??? Momma has MRSA in her wound!

    The moral of the story: are we using the disinfectant to replace hand-washing? I hope not!! I thought it was an additional barrier.
  3. by   FireStarterRN
    At my hospital we have both available in the room and we can choose either. We are to used soap and water if we actually get something visable on our hands, or if it's a C-Diff patient.

    People have come to totally rely on hand sanitizer because it's quicker. We have dispensers both in the room and in the halls. I suspect the people in question were planning to sanitize in the hall, but that means they would be touching to door knob with unsanitized hands, which in the case of MRSA is a definate no no.
  4. by   Alois Wolf
    Quote from jlsRN
    At my hospital we have both available in the room and we can choose either. We are to used soap and water if we actually get something visable on our hands, or if it's a C-Diff patient.

    People have come to totally rely on hand sanitizer because it's quicker. We have dispensers both in the room and in the halls. I suspect the people in question were planning to sanitize in the hall, but that means they would be touching to door knob with unsanitized hands, which in the case of MRSA is a definate no no.

    I was always told that hand sanitizer is not as effective as soap and water anyway... it may say it kills 99.9, but that's only on surfaces it touches. You figure there is the nail beds, underneath the nails and what if you're not using the proper amount of sanitizer? I dunno... I think washing your hands then using hand sanitizer outside the room and maybe some lotion to prevent dry skin (to prevent cracking) is the best route.
  5. by   Mahage
    My hospital says that except for c-dif that the hand sanitizer is more effective than soap and water except where c-dif is the bug. Of course with visible soil we are to wash and sanitize. Just heard it inorientation today. We were also taught that in nursing school.
  6. by   Mahage
    My hospital says that except for c-dif that the hand sanitizer is more effective than soap and water . Of course with visible soil we are to wash and sanitize. Just heard it inorientation today. We were also taught that in nursing school.
  7. by   kanzi monkey
    Maybe their hands were numb
  8. by   Alois Wolf
    Quote from kanzi monkey

    I thought I misplaced that jar of Novacaine somewhere.
  9. by   Imafloat
    Hand washing is the preferred method of cleaning our hands with MRSA patients. There is evidence that the hand sanitizer dries too quickly to kill all the nasty MRSA bugs.
  10. by   PageRespiratory!
    Relax, MRSA is a myth started by the government so medicare/aide won'y have to pay out for hospital "mistakes". Ya know a myth, just like global warming!:uhoh21:

    Seriously, was'nt there a thread started by a micro prof. about the use of microbiology in the everyday clinical seting? I hope he is reading this.
  11. by   everthesame
    Proper use of the hand sanitizers is often more effective than soap and water. Proper use includes using the correct amount and rubbing the hands together until the product is completely dry on the skin, usually 15-20 seconds if a sufficient amount is used. Of course the hand sanitizers are not to be used for c-diff or suspected c-diff patients. In those instances soap and water are recommended.
    CDC hand hygiene guidelines.
    http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5116a1.htm
    The staff "pretending" to use the empty sanitizer is just unprofessional and potentially dangerous behavior.
  12. by   NicoleERRN
    Besides PRETENDING to sanitize your hands in front of patients... how gross to not clean your hands for yourself??? EWWWWWW!!!
    i can't go in or leave a room without a scrub! Forget about looking "good" for patients i want MY hands clean for ME and others!!!
  13. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    As a traveler, I might do inpt dialysis in several facilities in one day. I'm not an employee of the hospital, and may not have had any orientation to the facility. It might be nocs, and there may be no housekeeping on duty.

    Also, when doing in-room bedside dialysis, the dialysis machine must be hooked up to the pt's sink, so there's no access to it to for anyone to wash their hands.

    On top of that, I can't leave the pt while the tx is in progress.

    So here is what I do for my own hand hygeine-

    I bought several of these small, personal size hand sanitizers- they clip right on to your scrub top.
    Attachment 5830Attachment 5831

    I bring a big 40 oz refill size jug of hand sanitizer with me in my work bag.
    Attachment 5832

    My pts often see me using my big alcohol bottle to refill my little one, and they ask me about it. I tell them "I go through four bottles of alcohol a day. But don't worry- four of the little ones, not four of the big ones."
    :biere:


    PS. I also bring Clorox wipes with me to clean the immediate area around the pt, and to clean my alcohol bottles. Before I leave each facility, I clean my shoes with the wipes, as well.
    Last edit by Hellllllo Nurse on Nov 19, '07

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