Staff Nurses Who Refuse To Precept Or Teach? - page 4

Of course I understand that not everyone wants to be a teacher or professor but a few of my coworkers lately have down right refused to precept or even be a resource to newer or less experienced... Read More

  1. by   Emergent
    So, what I am hearing from the 'everyone should precept' camp is: 'I love precepting, and everyone should be like me. If they don't want to precept, they aren't as good as me, and aren't helping the nursing profession, and might actually be bullies, who want to eat young instead of help them'.
  2. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from getoverit
    I've always wondered if the nurses who don't like teaching or precepting also didn't like it when their teachers and preceptors were helping them learn new things.... Seems like a double standard at times
    Quote from getoverit
    Ruby Vee, I have read your posts for many years and am a little taken aback by this one. I have been a preceptor for over 20 years and have received more than a couple awards for teaching/precepting. Not bragging on myself, just giving a little context for me to use your words back to you: clearly YOU don't know what you don't know and it would be best for YOU not to rush to judgment.
    Your post indicated judgement about a nurse who would dare express a preference not to precept, not to precept right NOW or not to precept THIS person. It seems to express that it is unacceptable for a nurse who has been the recipient of teaching and precepting in the past to decline the role of teacher or preceptor. The post I quoted is the one I was responding to, not your entire posting history.
  3. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Emergent
    So, what I am hearing from the 'everyone should precept' camp is: 'I love precepting, and everyone should be like me. If they don't want to precept, they aren't as good as me, and aren't helping the nursing profession, and might actually be bullies, who want to eat young instead of help them'.
    Yup, that seems to be the gist of it. Only we cannot accuse them of saying that, because they're all much better than those who don't wish to precept.
  4. by   Emergent
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Yup, that seems to be the gist of it. Only we cannot accuse them of saying that, because they're all much better than those who don't wish to precept.
    And less judgmental!
  5. by   JoannieO
    I see nothing has changed in nursing, as far as relationships go. Over 30 years ago, while working on a busy IV team in our local hospital, one nurse would always mention me to guide a new nurse or Senior nursing student, to travel with me, on a particular day. She would consistently "get out of" a new orientation or a student nurse with her. Now retired after 45 years of being a RN, I can see I first should have spoken out about this situation to our manager, and had a talk with the 3 of us together, on my observations. This must have truly affected me, because I still remember this particular nurse! Gentle Suggestion: Tell the nurse what you told us, and see if the nurse changes; if not, go to your supervisor/manager.
    Last edit by JoannieO on Dec 6 : Reason: changing wording
  6. by   MunoRN
    I don't think there's any basis for arguing you shouldn't have to do something that's an obligatory part of nursing just because it's not your favorite thing to do. I don't like cleaning up patient's poop, does that mean it's reasonable for me to say I shouldn't have to do it and it should be up to other nurses to do it? I don't like caring for obnoxious and agitated alcohol withdrawal patients, would it be reasonable for me to declare I'm just not going to take these patients? It's part of the job, put on your big boy/girl pants and get to it.
  7. by   NuGuyNurse2b
    Quote from getoverit
    That's not derisive, just a professional observation. But no one should be forced to precept someone else, it's not fair to either person.
    Your professional observation is derisive...
  8. by   NurseDisneyPrincess
    Quote from Emergent
    So, what I am hearing from the 'everyone should precept' camp is: 'I love precepting, and everyone should be like me. If they don't want to precept, they aren't as good as me, and aren't helping the nursing profession, and might actually be bullies, who want to eat young instead of help them'.
    I don't think everyone should be like me... but to be honest, I am in the "suck it up, buttercup" camp about it. New nurses (new to nursing, new to the field/hospital etc) have to learn on the job and someone has to show them the ropes. There's things in nursing that aren't my favorite things to do, but guess what? I suck it up and do it. In this thread I'm seeing a lot of, "It's not MY job." "I don't want the extra responsibility." "I don't get paid enough for this." Okay, well, that doesn't change the fact that someone has to do it. It's your chance to teach and impart your wisdom/knowledge upon someone. It's a chance to guide, to be a role model. It's an opportunity, and it is what you make of it. Can't teach? Why not learn something new. Regardless of "personality", everyone has something that they can pass on.

    If someone is worried they won't be a good preceptor or mentor, that's one thing. If they are just whining and stamping their foot because of the extra responsibility, then that's just called having a crummy attitude.

    I had a crappy preceptor. It was obvious she didn't want to deal with me and she didn't use her time with me constructively. Had she put forth the effort, I think our time together could have meant something. All she managed to do successfully was watch me like a hawk and scorn me when I didn't do something right. Having that experience motivated me and showed me what not to do when precepting someone.
    Last edit by NurseDisneyPrincess on Dec 7
  9. by   getoverit
    Quote from NuGuyNurse2b
    Your professional observation is derisive...
    You're entitled to your opinion and I'm entitled to think you're wrong
  10. by   maxthecat
    Personally I wouldn't want to be precepted by someone who didn't want to teach. I don't think it is every nurses's responsibility to precept either. To give help to a new nurse, yes--to formally precept, no.
  11. by   Rose_Queen
    My facility requires those who want to precept to apply for such a position and take a course in how to be a preceptor. It comes with $1/hour extra when working with an orientee. As an educator, I have actually refused to sign off on a preceptor application from someone well known to have a poor attitude and become verbally aggressive (the nurse manager also did not want to sign off on the application). It's a way to reward those willing to precept while ensuring that those who are orienting are paired with someone who knows how to be a preceptor, wants to be a preceptor, and has been approved to be a preceptor.
  12. by   winniewoman9060
    I liked to precept new nurses. I learn right along with them. I have lots of experience as a nurse, and like the relationship that develops between the preceptor and preceptee.
  13. by   SICUmurseCCRN
    i don't like when managers/institutions force senior nurses to precept or do things they don't want to/are not good at. why would anyone want to do something they aren't good at or don't like, they will be poor preceptors no matter how much experience they have. personality and the desire to teach make the best preceptors. also, just because you have a lot of experience doesn't make you a good nurse.

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