Squeezing Blood out of a Turnip..... - page 2

:( Even in the midst of critical nursing shortages, my State Board of Nursing is suspending the licenses of those who have defaulted on their student loans. What do they propose to accomplish, by... Read More

  1. by   CATHYW
    Originally posted by MPHkatie
    When I had some trouble paying my loan on time, I called and was immediately given a few months deferrment, so I don't have a lot of sympathy for anyone who defaults. Now, I suppose that my opinion isn't popular.


    Katie, I believe this is a DUH! moment. Somehow, some folks think that if they ignore their bills, they will go away, and only get panicky or indignant when someone calls them to account for their deliquency.
    If they took as much responsibility for their debts as they say they do for their profession, this would be a moot point. Calling the lender and explaining your financial situation and making arrangements to pay is much more preferable (and responsible)than just letting them slide.
    And, CaseMgr, I agree with you and Suzy. Pulling people out of their profession because of a failure to pay a debt is insane! I always thought that was a crazy way to get parents to pay overdue child support, too!
    I believe if the lender garnishees the nurse's wages, it will allow the Nurse to continue to work, and the lender to begin to be repaid. This is, if the Nurse takes no action on their own to set the debt right. Remember Logic class? "Decision by indecision?" Meaning, if you don't act to change circumstances, someone, or something, will act for you. The results may not turn out the way you would like!
    Come on, you all! It is time to take some responsibility for our lives, and quit making excuses. There are places like Consumer Credit Counseling that can help you work things out, if you are too far over your head!
    My opinion only...
  2. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    Originally posted by MPHkatie
    I must agree, that it seems more likely to get loans paid if the agency could simply draft the money out of the paycheck, but I think that is probably not possible.
    Why wouldn't this be possible? If someone is behind on child support, don't they just take it out of their paychecks?

    It just doesn't make sense. If I couldn't pay them back on a nurses salary, I sure can't do it on KMart's salary.

    Heather
  3. by   CseMgr1
    :chuckle Blue Light Special, Anyone? Thanks, Heather!
  4. by   Lausana
    Where I work now, I do the payroll & have an employee who is currently paying back a federal student loan via a garnishment. (although it was a loan from the 80's he dodged it pretty long!!) It really surprises me that states are not doing this. I understand that they might be trying to make a statement and scare people into paying back their loans, but garnishments are a guaranteed way to get the money. Plus, our company is required to pay it if the employee doesn't-like they're on sick leave and don't have enough disposable wages to cover it, So you can be sure I get that 10% out each week!!
  5. by   capgirl
    the government also seizes any income tax refund of a person in default of a student loan. (also anyone with child support in arrears)
  6. by   mother/babyRN
    Lets JUST punish the nurses.....Hmmm, sounds fishy but oh so common to me...Can't do it without us and want to step on us a little more while giving everyone else a free ride....I just KNOW that wouldn't happen in a male dominated profession.....
    I am totally in favor of paying back loans, but this is NOT the way of going about it, however, nurses against nurses on MANY fronts, has always seemed to me to be the primary reason behind the so called nursing shortage..I would get a lawyer too, and perhaps one who, in the past was a little late on his or her loan payment with no threat of disbarment, if you can find one to come forware. That would seem to me, an unfair labor practice of some sort....
  7. by   dudette10
    Did a search and I'm bringing back an old, old thread because I looked for the first time at the Dept. of Prof. Reg. website for my state to see common reasons for license suspension, revocation, and nonrenewal.

    It is CRAZY the number of people who have their license nonrenewed for default on student loans. In my state, all professional license actions are listed by month, and it happens to any profession in which the state must issue a license...including locksmiths in my state. Weird on that one.

    My state has garnishment processes set up for child support, so it just makes sense for them to do it with professional licenses, rather than revoking them. Yes, personal responsibility is of utmost importance, but stating a moral/legal obligation doesn't make money all of a sudden appear. Revoking a license certainly won't do it, either. Only garnishment will.

    The processes are already there--and there is a per month charge to the payer for the service--so it just makes sense to do it that way.
  8. by   Zookeeper3
    Alright, I've read the posts and I worked last night so I'm claiming stupid and beat up.... but this applies to the NEW GRADS too, whom we've seen here that can't find work, have bills and I'm sorry....house payment... student loan... house payment ..... student loan.


    Were are all these news agency's that promised nursing is the wave of the future now? I came from NY, In my home area... I had to work geriatric psyc for $10... when I graduated because the market was so saturated with nurses... and I made $20/hr as a waitress but gave it up to get my foot in the door.

    Luckily, my engineering husband, and hamberger helper got us through those times and sure as heck I had late payments. Never defaulted, but that crazy roof over our head vrs. our credit score took priority.

    Lived that in ... oooo '95 and it still goes on... in many states

    So now you've taken away:

    1. my ability to get experience to make a living as I'll have to keep being a waitress not a nurse
    2. My ability to take a pay cut and start from the bottom so I can be a productive nurse and pay back my loans



    hmmmmmn... what is the AMA doing for delinquent doctors? Love to hear about that.
  9. by   HouTx
    All,

    Just some clarification - in my state, all professional licenses are treated the same way in case of student loan default -- not just nurses. Texas only allows for wage garnishment in the case of child support.

    Student loan defaults are a huge problem - and getting worse. Students attending schools that exceed the established ceiling for defaults (20% I think) cannot get Federal aid at all. It seems like there are a continuing stream of 'poor little me' news stories about people who have rung up a six figure debt in student loans -- and they are the innocent 'victims'?

    It is a terrible situation to be in - but where is the accountability? No one is forced to take out loans. Loans must be paid back. I am certain that this requirement was discussed at some point in the process. It's not our fault if they can't get a job with their BA in Women's studies or the History of Film ... but it is our tax money that they used.

    I know that this may seem a tad socialistic to some, but IMHO, graduates with valuable (skilled) degrees should be offered some sort of 'work it off' plan during economic downturns like this... similar to the way artists were employed during the Great Depression. Nurses, physicians, accountants, teachers, etc.. could provide community benefit professional services in lieu of loan payments. The work could be done in public health centers or other not-for-profit organizations that receive federal funding.
  10. by   Jules A
    I absolutely do think a garnishment of wages would get the money owed and ensure it could be paid back so that would be the best outcome, imo. FWIW however as someone who hasn't ever gotten a penny of help and had to work their way through nursing school rather than rack up huge loans so I could "focus on school", didn't get thousands back when I bought my first house with a 20% down payment etc. my sympathy is nonexistent when it comes to people becoming indignant about being asked or required to pay back their debts.
  11. by   dudette10
    Quote from HouTx
    I know that this may seem a tad socialistic to some, but IMHO, graduates with valuable (skilled) degrees should be offered some sort of 'work it off' plan during economic downturns like this... similar to the way artists were employed during the Great Depression. Nurses, physicians, accountants, teachers, etc.. could provide community benefit professional services in lieu of loan payments. The work could be done in public health centers or other not-for-profit organizations that receive federal funding.
    Some nursing schools affiliated with a hospital systems do that, in what is called a "loan forgiveness" program. Usually, it's two years of service within that system for each year of loan forgiveness. The school I'm currently attending has no funding for that program because of the economic downturn. Their scholarships based on GPA were also cut by $1000 per person from last semester because of the economy.

    There is simply no money out there to do these kinds of things.
  12. by   outrunningzombies
    Quote from HouTx
    All,

    Just some clarification - in my state, all professional licenses are treated the same way in case of student loan default -- not just nurses.
    ANYONE who has to be licensed in Texas needs to be current on student loans. Even security guards making minimum wage.

    Student loans aren't fun, but if you call the companies before you run into problems, you can often work something out. You can get deferments for extenuating circumstances like unemployment and you get a certain number of "I just can't pay my loans right now" deferments. You can even set up your loan payments to start low and increase over a period of years. The key is to be proactive and call BEFORE you are behind.

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