Soooo, I quit - page 8

by TX911

15,312 Visits | 88 Comments

I've posted here quite a bit but have been here in awhile so I couldn't log back in for some reason. Anyway: I've worked ICU for the last year. I was a paramedic for years, transitioned to RN and got a job out of nursing... Read More


  1. 0
    That just stinks ghostwindrider
  2. 1
    Quote from SunShine35
    Employers should not say negative things about you unless it was true and documented. Most laws protect the employer from civil litigation, not you the employee if they violate it. The next issue is, did the person who gave the reference violate company policy when saying something about you? More than likely, your employment references arenít following company policy or state law when giving out information. The fastest way to cure a former supervisor giving you a bad reference would be to contact the Human Resource department and ask them to verify the company policy on reference checks. Most Human Resource departments will tell you they verify your dates of employment, title, confirm ending salary. Ask them how they would handle a supervisor in the company that is deviating from the company policy. Depending on what is being said, it might be best for you to take this information to a local attorney and get a legal opinion on your case. Most companies don't give references checks for this matter. Before nursing I was in the banking/corporate world for 12 1/2 years, we did not give reference checks and had a polocy stating such. All employee verification goes straight to HR. At my nursing job now, its the same way.

    Really? LOL. That's how it works? Nah. First of all, all that is needed is a neutral or questionable reference. All that is needed is, "Would hire this person again?" Their statement, "No," or even a hesitation. DONE.


    And there are so many ways to get around this, it's not funny.

    Ever since the wacko, euthanizer nurse Cullen, employers have more power to use this as a means to stretch things for some folks. This I have seen, as a fact. A nurse broke sterile technique! Thus he or she is a danger!??? Really? Maybe the GN didn't have the proper support and preceptor? (Too often the case IMHO.) They might not say that, but the implication is there. There are ways things can be said or communicated that can trash other people and their careers. It happens all the time.

    Also, do you really think HR and managment people in metropolitan areas do not know each other and speak to each other? Do they do so with each other for every name/application/resume that comes up? No.

    But it's wise for nurses to realize that often it's a smaller community than they realize--especially if they work in a specialized area. Cardiac--big time politics. Neonatal and Peds, especially critical care, can be hugely political and a small base of influence, even in a big city area. Now what is said from HR/NM/HR/NM whatever to another is on the sly. Do you really know and are you really going to be able to prove thus and such was damaging? Will you be able to measure voice inflection?

    Do you realize that less that 10% of all wrongful termination suits are won? An employer could be breaking EEOC requirements right and left. It is still the affected person's responsiblity (employee or ex-employe) to be able to PROVE IT. Proving things is a lot harder than it seems.

    I do NOT give any credence to the whole, "We just check dates and salary, etc." It may be true, but there is NO WAY to know. And anything else that is said would require a reputable witness or that it be in writing. Why do you think when they want to get rid of nurses at At-Will employment hospitals (most) they still try to put something down in writing on the nurse for the record, even though, with At-Will, you don't NEED to have a reason to fire anyone, for anything--unless there is a question regarding EEOC, and then it becomes an issue of federal law? (And as I said, even then, you have to be able to PROVE an EEOC violation.) At will employers don't need a reason to fire you, but they still try to cover their bases. You would NOT believe the noted pretext I have seen on firing perfectly fine, even great nurses. Pretext is desired, b/c what if that ex-employee does get a lawyer? While fighting the employer isn't in their favor necessarily, it's always a possibility. Plus there is potential negative exposure. They have to have something that looks like substance written down on paper.


    While I agree that the OP shouldn't have to put up with what he decribes, it would have been ideal for him to find a per diem position, at least very similar to the one he was working in, in the ICU. While he did have a back up plan as a medic, should he ever want to find another critical care position or the like, having only one year employment in the area, with no other employers to list, will be a great challenge for him. Say that he wants to go to CRNA school? Now he may be screwed if he doesn't list that year of ICU. At least if he had worked in another ICU per diem, one questionable issue of reference could be cancelled by one that says, "He is an excellent ICU RN." See what I mean?



    Always have more than one nursing position. Get that per diem position and keep so many hours a month. If you don't you might end up being screwed over--at least for a while.
    joanna73 likes this.
  3. 10
    Actually it wasn't a challenge at all. I got a contract at a CVICU in a level 1 trauma center within a week, while I was working on the ambulance. They apparently valued my many years of experience transporting critically ill pts on IABPs and such as well as my 1 year of in house CVICU experience.

    Oh and fyi, the company I worked for got sued into oblivion about 3 years ago due to a defamation suit and then again in January of this year for a wrongful termination suit. All their HR department is allowed to verify now are start and stop dates. They can't even say whether you're eligible for rehire or not. They can't say anything at all related to your employment whatsoever, except start and stop dates. In house policy. This is per the HR head after I'd spoke to a legal representative regarding my eligibility for rehire being based on not giving two weeks secondary to a "dangerous and/or hostile" work environment. I was more or less just interested in what i needed to put down on applications and ended up getting quite a lesson from a legal representative who suggested I pursue legal recourse should they give a "not eligible" reference. Both travel companies I spoke with as well as the unit manager at the hospital I'm going to said the same things.

    So what this experience has taught me is that no one has to put up with that crap, ever, and I was an absolute moron for taking report on three pts. It was unethical and immoral for me to do so and it won't ever happen again. The pushover I was for a year is what I'm ashamed of.
    Hoozdo, libbyliberal, Esme12, and 7 others like this.
  4. 0
    Hey---you have integrity. That is good. Ease up on yourself a bit. Congrats on your new job. Keep up the good work. And, I am so glad to know that there are still nurses like you "out there".
  5. 2
    samadams point is that a lot of the communication takes place outside the workplace. The head of the xyz hospital's HR dept belongs to the same club as the head of trs hospital's HR dept. etc
    joanna73 and hiddencatRN like this.
  6. 1
    That may be true but don't these department heads have better things to talk about than their employees? IMHO many nurses that go on to management have narcissistic personalities and would rather talk about themselves.
    Esme12 likes this.
  7. 1
    Quote from TX911
    Actually it wasn't a challenge at all. I got a contract at a CVICU in a level 1 trauma center within a week, while I was working on the ambulance. They apparently valued my many years of experience transporting critically ill pts on IABPs and such as well as my 1 year of in house CVICU experience.

    Oh and fyi, the company I worked for got sued into oblivion about 3 years ago due to a defamation suit and then again in January of this year for a wrongful termination suit. All their HR department is allowed to verify now are start and stop dates. They can't even say whether you're eligible for rehire or not. They can't say anything at all related to your employment whatsoever, except start and stop dates. In house policy. This is per the HR head after I'd spoke to a legal representative regarding my eligibility for rehire being based on not giving two weeks secondary to a "dangerous and/or hostile" work environment. I was more or less just interested in what i needed to put down on applications and ended up getting quite a lesson from a legal representative who suggested I pursue legal recourse should they give a "not eligible" reference. Both travel companies I spoke with as well as the unit manager at the hospital I'm going to said the same things.

    So what this experience has taught me is that no one has to put up with that crap, ever, and I was an absolute moron for taking report on three pts. It was unethical and immoral for me to do so and it won't ever happen again. The pushover I was for a year is what I'm ashamed of.
    I am so happy for you!
    roser13 likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from morte
    samadams point is that a lot of the communication takes place outside the workplace. The head of the xyz hospital's HR dept belongs to the same club as the head of trs hospital's HR dept. etc
    What do you think those meetings of "Nurse Executives" are all about? I remember how stunned I was when I first realized what the Organization of Nurse Executives talked about during dinner.
  9. 0
    Quote from TX911
    Actually it wasn't a challenge at all. I got a contract at a CVICU in a level 1 trauma center within a week, while I was working on the ambulance. They apparently valued my many years of experience transporting critically ill pts on IABPs and such as well as my 1 year of in house CVICU experience.

    Oh and fyi, the company I worked for got sued into oblivion about 3 years ago due to a defamation suit and then again in January of this year for a wrongful termination suit. All their HR department is allowed to verify now are start and stop dates. They can't even say whether you're eligible for rehire or not. They can't say anything at all related to your employment whatsoever, except start and stop dates. In house policy. This is per the HR head after I'd spoke to a legal representative regarding my eligibility for rehire being based on not giving two weeks secondary to a "dangerous and/or hostile" work environment. I was more or less just interested in what i needed to put down on applications and ended up getting quite a lesson from a legal representative who suggested I pursue legal recourse should they give a "not eligible" reference. Both travel companies I spoke with as well as the unit manager at the hospital I'm going to said the same things.

    So what this experience has taught me is that no one has to put up with that crap, ever, and I was an absolute moron for taking report on three pts. It was unethical and immoral for me to do so and it won't ever happen again. The pushover I was for a year is what I'm ashamed of.

    Dude! Major congratulations! You did have things turn in your favor, but be advised, this is not often the case. But in general principle, I agree with you.

    About the wrongful termination, well, perhaps it really needed to be done. So many places get a way with SO much, it's not funny. At the same time, the honest statistics still don't show much promise for the bulk of wrongful termination suits---BUT, maybe this is finally starting to change with nurses.

    I'm not a litigious person, but there are times when a stand clearly has to be made.
  10. 2
    Quote from Paco-RN
    I've often been told that new grads should not start out in ICU, even if you have prior critical experience such as being a paramedic. Perhaps you could have found your groove in nursing better starting out in a more acute med-surg floor? Just a thought. Sorry to hear that you had to burn your bridges like that.
    No. Just no. This person obviously has the background to handle this kind of situation. 3:1 with the load he describes is down right dangerous no matter how superman you are. He did the right thing. Something most of us wish we could do.
    ~*Stargazer*~ and roser13 like this.


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