So smart they are dumb? - page 2

by Uniquemoi04 | 3,324 Views | 18 Comments

I am about to start nursing school in two weeks but have been working at a level 1 trauma center as an EMT for almost two years and ask, how would you handle this situation: I go to the 8th floor (women's unit) to pick up a... Read More


  1. 0
    next time offer to get the interpreter phone (or whatever your facility uses). This guy is an immature jerk and not typical of healthcare providers. Hope she did not need to sign a consent!
  2. 0
    The scenario describes me sitting in Statistics class....
  3. 2
    and then your Honor I woke up 5 minutes later with my hands around the Dr. neck.
    Ploppers and casi like this.
  4. 2
    here is my theory i have been developing for a long time;

    there is only so much room in the brain (forget about that "you only use 10% of your brain" and study some modern psychology / neuroscience)

    the more you learn about any one subject, the more other items must be shoveled out to make room for this one subject you are learning about.

    if you learn too much about any one subject you will be lacking (noticeably) in some other (unrelated) area.

    i don't care if you are a doctor, inventor, accountant, writer, or a sheetrocker. when you learn so much about one subject other areas must suffer.

    it can manifest itself in many ways, but social skills seem to be the first to go. it may be that you just put so much into what you learn/do (same thing for these folks) that you just lack practice of social skills and are considered rude/egotistical etc by others. but really you just dont have room in your brain to remember those skills.

    this "syndrome of overlearning" can manifest itself in other ways too, not just social skills;
    lack of any basic communication skills
    absentmindedness
    can't cook
    never travels
    bad driver
    no hobbies

    but lack of social skills is the main issue for most suffering from this syndrome.

    p.s. i have had this theory since long before becoming a nurse. nursing has just reinforced my theory.
    Angie O'Plasty, RN and nminodob like this.
  5. 0
    Two really good books . . .one on the brain for "balder":

    "Another Day in the Frontal Lobe - a brain surgeon exposes life on the inside" by Katrina Firlik

    http://www.katrinafirlik.com/

    And one about docs and nurses:

    "Reflections on Doctors - Nurses' Stories about Physicians and Surgeons" by Terry Ratner, RN, MFA Kaplan Voices

    http://www.amazon.com/Reflections-Do.../dp/1427798257




    steph
  6. 0
    Quote from balder_lpn
    here is my theory i have been developing for a long time;

    there is only so much room in the brain (forget about that "you only use 10% of your brain" and study some modern psychology / neuroscience)

    the more you learn about any one subject, the more other items must be shoveled out to make room for this one subject you are learning about.

    if you learn too much about any one subject you will be lacking (noticeably) in some other (unrelated) area.

    i don't care if you are a doctor, inventor, accountant, writer, or a sheetrocker. when you learn so much about one subject other areas must suffer.

    it can manifest itself in many ways, but social skills seem to be the first to go. it may be that you just put so much into what you learn/do (same thing for these folks) that you just lack practice of social skills and are considered rude/egotistical etc by others. but really you just dont have room in your brain to remember those skills.

    this "syndrome of overlearning" can manifest itself in other ways too, not just social skills;
    lack of any basic communication skills
    absentmindedness
    can't cook
    never travels
    bad driver
    no hobbies

    but lack of social skills is the main issue for most suffering from this syndrome.

    p.s. i have had this theory since long before becoming a nurse. nursing has just reinforced my theory.
    in general, i agree with your theory. while some people are able to learn more than others, we all have our limits.

    in addition, we are all limited by time. there are 24 hours in a day. time spent reading is time that can not be spent in other areas, such as developing social skills.

    there is also a degree of self selection involved. we tend toward those activities in which we have the most talent. that is why i take college courses rather than play sports.

    however, being a health care practitioner requires some degree of social skills. perhaps this doctor would be better suited in research.
  7. 2
    While I certainly agree that the doctor was being a jerk ...

    I hate to see intelligence and educated used as a reason for being a jerk. It's form of prejudice and professional nurses should be above that. There are millions of people who are intelligent, well-educated, and also decent human beings. We should should not excuse bad behavior because of intellectual skills -- nor should we assume that people with intellectual skills are by default jerks.

    This prejudice against intelligence and education has held the profession of nursing back for generations. It starts with using intellectual skills as a "reason" for bad behavior ... then progresses to using intellectual skills as an "excuse" for bad behavior ... then progresses to a reason to not like or accept people of great intellegence or education into the clique ... then progresses to discouraging people not to "act too smart" or to get "too educated" lest they also turn into some socially unacceptable geek.
  8. 0
    Yes this unusual. Hopefully that nurse took it up the chain of command or to the medical director. If he did that in front of witnesses what else is he doing when no one is looking.
  9. 1
    Uh, actually illegal to fail to provide an interpreter. Not a choice.
    Balder_LPN likes this.


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