So long Nursing - page 3

by realnursealso/LPN 2,174 Views | 35 Comments

So long nursing...it's been real and I've learned alot. I'm 48 now and I started all this when I was 27. My feet are flat now...no arches from all the steps I've taken in 21 years. The disc's in my back are bulging according to... Read More


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    Originally posted by terriv:
    in two months i'll have to bid on my job. i'm really tired. and i cant be a nurse like i was ...... i just can't do this yet. i have an 11 year old son. so i guess i'm stuck.
    Dear Terriv, you are most likely at one of the large medical facilities which are downsizing and reorginizing in the Pittsburgh area. Some are just starting this painful process, others completed it long ago. Having lived through downsizing and been chased out of acute care by it, here is my advice. Start looking around!! It is true that many nurses are being thrown on to the market by the closing of hospitals in this area but their are still jobs out there. Being forced to reapply for your job is a very bad sign, things will most likely get nastier and nastier. If I knew then what I knew now I would not have stayed for the abuse. Forty is not old, I felt like a kid when I was forty, I am convinced I would still feel like a kid if I did not live through the medical disaster of the last decade. Just be careful to roll your 401K over very carefully when you do move. You have less time to work on a pension than a person of twenty or thirty.
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    Boy, what a depressing thread! I understand that it is hard out there in many places, and I too am getting up in years and am battling a body that no longer can do what it used to; but I am not leaving nursing in the near or distant future. I did find a job I love and would like to be able to retire from it at age 65, but know that that may not be possible physically anymore. I'm a night nurse in CV-ICU, and there are days when this body can't do what I want it to- 31 years in nursing has taken its toll on me. But even so, I am still excited to go to work and care for my patients and try to do my best for my shift. I have found that there are places that do respect nurses and nursing, but Pittsburgh doesn't sound like one of them (I swear, I don't think I've read of a happy nurse from there on this site yet. Please correct me if I'm wrong.) Life is short for all of us, why work in a place that is making you miserable?
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    Originally posted by Jenny P:
    Boy, what a depressing thread! I understand that it is hard out there in many places, and I too am getting up in years and am battling a body that no longer can do what it used to; but I am not leaving nursing in the near or distant future. I did find a job I love and would like to be able to retire from it at age 65, but know that that may not be possible physically anymore. I'm a night nurse in CV-ICU, and there are days when this body can't do what I want it to- 31 years in nursing has taken its toll on me. But even so, I am still excited to go to work and care for my patients and try to do my best for my shift. I have found that there are places that do respect nurses and nursing, but Pittsburgh doesn't sound like one of them (I swear, I don't think I've read of a happy nurse from there on this site yet. Please correct me if I'm wrong.) Life is short for all of us, why work in a place that is making you miserable?
    Dear Jenny, Sorry didn't mean to depress you. Never intended to be a downer. I wanted to say farewell to my profession and I just wanted to have my own swan song...farewell..to something that was my passion for 21 years. I am burned out from nursing and was just remembering how it was when I started. Wishing things were different for all the other nurses who continue to give their all at work. So sorry that the new grads can't have things the way they were when I started my nursing career. The almighty dollar rules now, not the patients. Was just remembering how nursing used to be so different...you had time to hold a hand...sit down and comfort a scared patient. I used to go home every day with a smile on my face, my work done to perfection, and excited to go back the next day. Wish you all well. Also I wouldn't have wanted to be anyhting else but a nurse. Carry on Jenny....bye

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    Originally posted by realnursealso/LPN:
    So long nursing...it's been real and I've learned alot. I'm 48 now and I started all this when I was 27. My feet are flat now...no arches from all the steps I've taken in 21 years. The disc's in my back are bulging according to the MRI I had because of my numb left leg. I loved being a nurse...I felt ten feet tall when my kids would say..."My mommy's a nurse." But you know it was all so different then. In my first job at a nursing home(they call it LTC now) I loved to sit and listen to the stories my patients told me about when they were young. Used to be the afternoon med pass was about one half hour long and I would be able to listen to them while i did my charting. But somehow through the years it all changed. The last nursing home I worked in, I was lucky to get done by the time I was supposed to go home. No time to visit, no time to show them how much you care...just give the pills, do the treatments and hope you can get done. I've done high tech pediaric home care for the last few years, but I missed the facilities. Tried going back to hospital nursing last year, what a joke. Supper? a break? Loved my patients...but it had all changed. No more time to hold a hand...comfort a lonely patient...or just listen like we used to. Not giving up...just giving in. Hope all you young ones with the hopes and ideals that we all had can change somethings. Take back the real reason we all became involved in the first place. Tell all the CEO's that caring and hope can't be bought, and profits have no place in the wonder of healing, and the touch of a nurse on a worried patients hand is something that can't be duplicated. That you need time to be able to listen and sit down when someone says,"I'm scared about tomorrow, won't you sit and talk with me awhile?" I guess I'm not strong enough...my feet hurt too much, and my back hurts every day when I get home. But the thing that hurts the most is my heart that was so excited and beating out of my chest that first day when I put on my white uniform and cap and went to work the first time with a nametag that said I was a nurse. It's a desk job for me...sort of social work. So you guys carry on...make a difference...like I tried to. Good Luck to you all...bye.

    I am 59 and work in the fine No rights for employees state of Florida. I was fired from a hospital OR because the manager felt "uncomfortable" working with me - ( had more credentials and experience than her) I went to agency med surg Tele - they wanted me to come on board as an employee of the hospital. One of the back stabbing night RNS refused to help with admissions (six from 5-7pm when she arrivedm and trumped complaint to house supv and new floor manager so I left there 3 days after I started. Unfortunately I do have to work until I am 65 and have no financial help available. I have been battling the "we don't want older nurses so we will hire you and make you so miserable you will leave" situation for approx 10 years. As we all know nurses work for years with nothing to look forward to but social security - because along the way we have had to move on to another facility to protect our sanity and not get fired because we see the problem with patient care. I wish you the best of luck, real nurse


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    Dear Realnursealso/LPN, I didn't mean to ruin your swan song; but I do believe that there are places that can cause burnout; those are the places that chew up nurses and wear them down and spit them out so that the nurse has no choice but to leave that workplace or nursing. I also have a strong belief that if you love nursing, there is no such thing as leaving it- no matter what you do, you will take your assessment and organizational skills with you. I volunteer at our state fair for my nursing association. Several years ago, another nurse and I used to play a game while we did this and we'd try to pick out the nurses. There was something about a person who was a nurse-- sensible shoes, comfortable clothes, and a keen observant eye. Maybe there was something else, but we weren't able to identify it in words. Anyway, about 90-95% of the people we would pick out as being a nurse usually were nurses or were retired from nursing. So it's kind of one of those "once a nurse, always a nurse" type of things. Good luck in your new job; but don't be surprised if you find yourself using some of those nursing skills on a daily basis.
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    Hi colleagues. As usual, I'm going to offer additional two cents and more on this topic. I think that Jenny P and others make a good point with their posts. I think that every worker should have other abilities and interests on the side to rely on or be willing to take risks and find what fits.

    Decades ago, women did not feel they had a choice or they did not desire one. They only chose those professions that extended what they were already doing in their home and community for little financial and professional rewards. Now, women are qualified to do many jobs and work, and there are so many tools to research for a good work or job fit. This is not to discourage those who are truly interested in nursing, because we need all the support we can get. But, nurses and teachers, in particular, seem to put their heart and soul in their work and still come out with the short end of the stick. I think it was you, Jenny, who pointed out that we seem to take on the victim role under another post. Let's look at it from this standpoint. If we're not able to perform our work as we know we need to, then who really suffers? Who gets the most attention with their complaints besides the doctors and lawyers? It's the patients, families, parents, and now children. What nurses, I think, are finally recognizing is that we need to be truly proactive to advance our agenda, which is to provide quality health and medical care and assist the public in having a high quality of life, and that we have the opportunity to do it in great numbers. It's true that playing victim or giving up is longer serving us as it has in the past. Many of us, as we age will be the benefactors of these actions. Having wrote that, I still believe that we need to point out players that undermine our effort in providing the care that the public calls for and needs.

    It's a shame that realnurse is not reporting to us that he/she has joined a local nursing support group or some other nursing group or association and will continue to support nursing from the sidelines. So many of us, especially our up and coming nurses could benefit from the knowledge and expertise.
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    Mijourney, that is an interesting concept: a nursing support group! Yes, it would be nice if retiring nurses or those leaving nursing would belong to their nursing organizations; if they got the support from other nurses, would they feel so burnt out?
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    You sound like you made a big difference to all the patients you cared for. It is always a shame when good nurses like yourself leave/retire. I have only been qualified 11 months and I try to make a difference daily to all my patients. A simply smile, touch of hands; comfort and reassurence or a little chat can mean the world to some. However in England as it is everywhere we are very short of good caring nurses. I often go home frustrated because I might have had only a minute to chat or something that I said I would do if I had time was not done. It is up to us professionals to change this. Every time a shift is poorly staffed we should speak out. Fill in an incident report tell the ward manager or go higher if need be. One day someone might actually listen. If we all do this we can make a very big noise. I hope when I retire I can say I have made a difference. It will be us in those hospital beds eventually lets not put our patients a risk or make them feel isolated/alone anymore.
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    I read these posts and am struck by the absolute reality that we as nurses are facing. I, too, have been in healthcare for over 30 years and my body is breaking down, does not react like it should or as quickly as it should. I go to bed with aches in places i did not know existed and wake up the same way. The one notable exception is that I wake up and these aches and pains do not control me now as they once did. For me, nursing was and is the best decision that i ever made in my life. I truly enjoy nursing overall, not that i don't have rough or bad shifts...we all do. The difference for me is when i left the employee role and became a business owner and independent practice nurse. I control my future now. If you would like to know more about what my nursing focus is, go to our company website, www.preferredrns.com, check out the site, sign the guestbook, and click on the articles section. There is an article there ENERGY CONNECTIONS: A PERSONAL JOURNEY that i wrote for inclusion as a book chapter and it depicts the philosophy of nursing that moved me through my career. In addition to bedside practice, I coach nurses on an individual basis to help them with career options, negotiation skills, entrepreneurship, and an array of other issues.

    The gist of all this is: There IS hope, there are ways of making your nursing lives more harmonious with the other parts of your lives. We still need the wisdom of our senior nurses to shape the generation of nurses who will be caring for us in a few years. Your careers have not been without meaning and your futures can be more meaningful. If you have made a difference in one person's life in your career, you are special. You can still make a difference for others the rest of your life.

    Best regards to all
    Chas
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    To Realnurse.
    I hope you enjoy your new job. I would give anything to get out of hospital nursing. I do not think my husband believes me when I come home after a 12 hour shift that is really 13.5 or 14 and say that nursing is killing me. I usually start with 5 or 6 then by 2 or 3 in the afternoon I haves 7 or 8 with no nursing assistant. I am thankful every day if I don't hurt someone. If any one has any suggestions of another career I am listening. I live in south Florida where the pay is low. RN


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