So, I'm leaving my unit of 2 1/2 years

  1. 2 And the unit is chronically short staffed, chronically toxic, and just about everyone who CAN leave, does leave, whenever they find other opportunities. And so, I'm leaving for another job where a few of us have gone to another employer in town who is hiring. Just about everyone who can leave lately is leaving.

    I understand the mangement may be annoyed, but after I put in my notice, I dutifully worked 2 extra weeks because it's the right thing to do. Today was my last day on the floor and not ONE of the management coordinators said a word to me -- no goodbye, no "sorry to see you go, we will miss you," not a "you suck, we're glad you're leaving, " -- absolutely NOTHING.

    So, is this how it is in nursing? So totally impersonal that they cannot even thank you for all your hard work for almost 3 years on their unit??

    co-workers of mine are very sad, many hugging me goodbye, etc ....but the management -- you can forget it.

    It's such an incredible insult.
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  3. Visit  SoundofMusic} profile page

    About SoundofMusic

    Joined Apr '07; Posts: 1,005; Likes: 2,113.

    21 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  BackfromRetirement} profile page
    1
    When nursing became all about the bottom line, it became impersonal. Everyone is scared for their jobs and mgmt is slashing and burning.
    lkwashington likes this.
  5. Visit  WarmBlanket} profile page
    14
    Quote from SoundofMusic
    And the unit is chronically short staffed, chronically toxic, and just about everyone who CAN leave, does leave, whenever they find other opportunities. And so, I'm leaving for another job where a few of us have gone to another employer in town who is hiring. Just about everyone who can leave lately is leaving.

    I understand the mangement may be annoyed, but after I put in my notice, I dutifully worked 2 extra weeks because it's the right thing to do. Today was my last day on the floor and not ONE of the management coordinators said a word to me -- no goodbye, no "sorry to see you go, we will miss you," not a "you suck, we're glad you're leaving, " -- absolutely NOTHING.

    So, is this how it is in nursing? So totally impersonal that they cannot even thank you for all your hard work for almost 3 years on their unit??

    co-workers of mine are very sad, many hugging me goodbye, etc ....but the management -- you can forget it.

    It's such an incredible insult.
    SoundofMusic : Let me get this straight : you think 3 years of training,dedication, competency and hard work makes you special ? Here is the truth : YOU ARE SPECIAL. ..... and they know it. Some might want to see you leave because your work outshines them , some people are just nasty and some are cowards. Go forward and keep up the good work - as for being insulted , it is a reflection on them. What goes around etc .............. Just super glue your locker shut and wave goodbye. : )
    Zookeeper3, Orange Tree, Leelee2, and 11 others like this.
  6. Visit  suanna} profile page
    8
    You said it yourself- this unit (hospital) the norm is rapid turnover. Look at it from thier perspective- If you keep orientation to a minimum, if a nurse quits after 2-3 years service, you always have low pay scale, little vacation, young healthy single staff to keep your health care and sick time costs down. The hospital has decided quality care and skilled staff are not as important as the bottom line. I don't think it was unusual at all, the way they acted- your departure was planned for and expected from the day you hired. Take your skills and committment and work for a place that values high quality nursing care. The job you are leaving dosen't deserve a moments thought- they did one thing- you can now apply as an experienced nurse.
    Orange Tree, pedicurn, Faeriewand, and 5 others like this.
  7. Visit  JulieCVICURN} profile page
    8
    We have the same problem in our unit. The coworkers I have are a fantastic team. I couldn't have asked for better people to work with. Our team leader/manager? Not so much. Turnover is higher than ever, and she never even tries to stop people from leaving. Or, when she does stop people from leaving it's never in a "You're so important we can't lose you" kind of way. What she does is, when she gets wind that someone is thinking of applying for a transfer, she finds a reason to write them up so that they'll be ineligible. That way, she retains the employee and doesn't have to bother with the touchy feely "please don't leave us" routine.

    I recently won a fantastic tranfer job that I interviewed for. She was blindsided because I didn't tell her (knowing that she'd find a way to block it). She didn't have time to block it, and she never tried to talk me into not leaving. This, despite the fact that in my review 2 weeks ago she told me I was one of her best employees and had more leadership skills than the majority of nurses on her unit.

    It's sad how they've lost sight of how to treat people.
  8. Visit  Otessa} profile page
    2
    SoundOfMusic,

    I have been there. Your co-workers are sad, the management sees you leaving as ANOTHER person they need to replace. You would think they'd learn if so many have left already of the "why" behind all the leaving.

    otessa
    Jules A and JB2007 like this.
  9. Visit  SoundofMusic} profile page
    0
    Thanks to everyone for all their replies. They confirm what I've suspected about these large teaching hospitals and the bottom line. And I think it's so sick. Really sick.

    I'd always been told -- X hospital is where you go to learn, and then after 2-3 years, you go to where you REALLY want to work.

    But what does that do for X hospital and the community? Always running w/ inexperienced staff ...always a cluster.

    Isn't there a better way somewhere, somehow?

    What she does is, when she gets wind that someone is thinking of applying for a transfer, she finds a reason to write them up so that they'll be ineligible. That way, she retains the employee and doesn't have to bother with the touchy feely "please don't leave us" routine.
    Our manager did the EXACT same thing -- to a number of nurses on the floor. But then one or two of us got out under the radar anyway. They can only do that for so long. They must be working out of the same instruction manual on How to Treat Nurses on the Floor.

    Oh well -- I guess I'd better be glad I made it out alive, w/ my license intact. I was never written up, never abused too badly. I guess they did expect my departure -- it exactly how they are acting. Just weird.

  10. Visit  PostOpPrincess} profile page
    3
    Let it go.

    Don't look for affirmation or any type of validation. It will only hurt you (I already see it in your post). When you harbor resentment, that negativity will effect your outlook in your future nursing career.

    Chalk it up their shortsightedness--remember, you had a way out...they--for whatever reason, fear--years of investment--can't leave.
    Otessa, HoneyDew70, and Faeriewand like this.
  11. Visit  PostOpPrincess} profile page
    1
    Quote from WarmBlanket
    SoundofMusic : Let me get this straight : you think 3 years of training,dedication, competency and hard work makes you special ? Here is the truth : YOU ARE SPECIAL. ..... and they know it. Some might want to see you leave because your work outshines them , some people are just nasty and some are cowards. Go forward and keep up the good work - as for being insulted , it is a reflection on them. What goes around etc .............. Just super glue your locker shut and wave goodbye. : )
    I wouldn't do the last part because they may arrest you for destruction of property. Leave them Hershey's kisses instead and a pic of a nice, big behind....hehe....
    Faeriewand likes this.
  12. Visit  elkpark} profile page
    5
    I've seen a wide range of possibilities (when leaving a position), from my entire last day passing without anyone mentioning that it was my last day to wonderful "goodbye" parties (with gifts!) On one unit, I actually worked my entire last day without anyone acknowledging it was my last day, and, before I left the unit at the end of the day, I made a point of sticking my head into the NM's office to pleasantly say goodbye and say something nice about having worked there. She looked up from what she was doing and said, "Oh, is this your last day?? Oh, ok, goodbye ..." and that was it. (And this was a small unit, with a supposedly "close" staff -- it's not like there were so many people she lost track of me ...)

    I also had one v. unpleasantly passive-agressive NM, who did everything possible to drive me away from the unit, throw a big party for me when I finally did resign, and carry on like she really cared about me and was soooo sorry I was leaving (don't worry, no one fell for it -- everyone knew how she was).

    I don't let it bug me; I figure a bad leave-taking experience is just further proof that I'm doing the right thing by leaving.
    Orange Tree, pedicurn, Otessa, and 2 others like this.
  13. Visit  Lucky0220} profile page
    2
    Quote from soundofmusic

    and the unit is chronically short staffed, chronically toxic, and just about everyone who can leave, does leave, whenever they find other opportunities. and so, i'm leaving for another job where a few of us have gone to another employer in town who is hiring. just about everyone who can leave lately is leaving.

    i understand the mangement may be annoyed, but after i put in my notice, i dutifully worked 2 extra weeks because it's the right thing to do. today was my last day on the floor and not one of the management coordinators said a word to me -- no goodbye, no "sorry to see you go, we will miss you," not a "you suck, we're glad you're leaving, " -- absolutely nothing.

    so, is this how it is in nursing? so totally impersonal that they cannot even thank you for all your hard work for almost 3 years on their unit??

    co-workers of mine are very sad, many hugging me goodbye, etc ....but the management -- you can forget it.

    it's such an incredible insult.


    you sound like a wonderful and caring nurse. why are you surprised that no one from management said anything to you? you stated it yourself as i highlighted in red. usually units that have chronic problems are units with poor management and it all trickles down. they obviously have not appreciated the good staff that they had and that is why they left. the fact that your co workers cared, should be your real validation. they are the ones who really knew you. good luck in your new position. they will be lucky to have you there.
    RNperdiem and David13 like this.
  14. Visit  shiccy} profile page
    0
    I'm not going into details, however, after being on my unit for 3 years, I'm transferring as well. Best of luck to you in your new job!!

    Managers think, sometimes, that they shouldn't show emotion b/c it makes them look weak. ... They don't do it on purpose, but this view makes for a realization that the other end it makes some look like they don't care.
  15. Visit  mustlovepoodles} profile page
    2
    Quote from SoundofMusic
    And the unit is chronically short staffed, chronically toxic, and just about everyone who CAN leave, does leave, whenever they find other opportunities. And so, I'm leaving for another job where a few of us have gone to another employer in town who is hiring. Just about everyone who can leave lately is leaving.

    I understand the mangement may be annoyed, but after I put in my notice, I dutifully worked 2 extra weeks because it's the right thing to do. Today was my last day on the floor and not ONE of the management coordinators said a word to me -- no goodbye, no "sorry to see you go, we will miss you," not a "you suck, we're glad you're leaving, " -- absolutely NOTHING.

    So, is this how it is in nursing? So totally impersonal that they cannot even thank you for all your hard work for almost 3 years on their unit??

    co-workers of mine are very sad, many hugging me goodbye, etc ....but the management -- you can forget it.

    It's such an incredible insult.
    I worked in a 40-bed NICU like this, the only one for about 250 miles. So we got everything. It was incredibly stressful, with constant admissions and crises. Even so, at least one of the nurses got floated out to other units on a daily basis. There was huge competition between nurses--it was often newbies against old-timers. The old-timers had all been educated at the same little junior college, never worked anywhere else, and thought they were the last word on all things neonatal. One of us was assigned to cover L&D every shift and that didn't mean you had a lighter assignment. You had that, plus your regular 3-4 critical neonates. There were times that I spent 6 of my 12 hours in L&D, while my colleagues did their best to cover my babies. In step-down, it wasn't unusual to have 5 premies. It was one 12hr feeding frenzy. Crazy~ Management didn't care if we got lunch, didn't care if our workload was unmanageable, and didn't hesitate to try to coerce us into working 16hr shifts.On top of this, we were dealing with extremely stressed out parents who often blew their stack and caused scenes--I'm sure they were picking up on the general toxicity of the unit. I lasted about 10 months. In my exit interview the manager complained that the NICU was like a revolving door--they had a 50% 2yr turnover rate. Unbelieveable. Well, not really, considering how we were treated. When i left the management totally ignored me, like I had insulted them. I shook the dust from my shoes and moved on. No regrets.
    carolmaccas66 and Faeriewand like this.


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