Smoking - page 7

I think we all know smoking is bad for us. Even if we do it, but should any place be able to not hire a smoker? I understand no smoke breaks and no smoking on the grounds. But you can't work here... Read More

  1. by   PilotJim68
    YOU GO GIRL !!!!!!!!:hatparty:
  2. by   slyhrtbt
    Well if anyone was going to quit it would not be some sanctomoniuos person that talks like PilotJim. I'm not trying to get personal but he seems to want to get personal with us smokers. Well You are no better than I am. If you were perfect than You could look down on me for smoking. I enjoy smoking for now. I will quit sometime but not right now. When I quit you can rest assured you had nothing positive to do with it whatsoever. My hats off to anyone who has quit. My 2 biggest pet peeves are Arrogance and Rudeness. You showed both and I cannot respect anyone who show's either much less both.
  3. by   gwenith
    Despite what you say Jim I have had considerable success with assisting people to give up and I don't get in thier faces about smoking. It is like the old lightbulb joke you know

    "How many psychologists does it take to change a lightbulb?"

    "Only one but the bulb has got to want to change first"

    They have to want to change first but standing and confronting them will not do that as all it will do is raise defences and cause resistance. What you do is get them to list the reasons why they currently smoke - not why they should give up they know they should but what keeps them coming back for one more ciggi.

    Then you sit down and address them one by one. It does help if you have been there yourself as you know some of the things that keep you smoking and the triggers that make someone want to light up. You have to look at ways around these and talk the person through it you empower them.

    Try it it is more effective and will help you maintain better relations with those who are smokers now.
  4. by   slyhrtbt
    Now I would listen to gwenith.
  5. by   PilotJim68
    Different strokes for different folks I say...really my original intent was NOT to try to get people to quit smoking because that is an individual decision that only the afflicted person can make. My intent is to make people aware of things they may not have considered in the past along with my heart felt opinions which there is no lack of those on this board by all parties.
    All I want (as well as many other nonsmokers) is a little consideration when it comes to this subject, if the people who chose to kill themselves and others dont want to associate with me...well then I am much better off for all of the reasons I have listed in my previous posts (take your smoke and odor and go), you arent hurting me at all, in fact you are helping me by letting me breathe clean, untainted air, remember I am not the one who smokes (unless I am forced to inhale that second hand smoke).
    Gwen, you are correct by saying that a person has to want to change before they will make an effort to do so, this applies to all drug addicts or any habit that must be changed. I think that being aware of how many people are offended by smoking is one step closer to convincing people to make that decision. After all, in a lot of cases it was peer pressure that got them addicted to begin with. But addiction seems to be stronger than peer pressure.

    Awareness can be a huge factor in helping someone to quit....dont tell me that everyone already knew or considered all of the negative factors that I have listed in my posts. I have spent a long time observing people and unconsciously making mental notes about the similarities that most smokers have, mainly because all aspects of smoking and smokers just irritate the hell out of me...these are my observations and my opinions and I have expressed them as many of you have expressed your thoughts and opinions as well......its all fair, after all, we are ALL entitled to our opinions like we are ALL entitled to breathe clean, untainted air.

    I am choosing to refrain from rebutling the DIRECT personal attacks against me because I am in fact a better person than that and I am aware that some of my statements can be inflammatory to those who are super sensitive....so flame away, I encourage you to let your anger out...after all, its healthier and more therapeutic than limping to that crutch and lighting up

    If you want to attack me, do so in a PM, that way I can at least defend myself without the moderator getting involved and tieing one hand behind my back.
  6. by   gwenith
    Comedian Steve Martin is reputed to be a rabid anti-smoker and is credited with one of the best come back lines I have ever heard.

    When asked at dinner if he minded if someone smoked he replied "No do you mind if I f*rt!"

    Humour can be another way of confronting a problem without triggering either resistance or strong responses.
  7. by   CougRN
    i haven't heard of a hospital ever doing this. but i have heard of some companies that require that you are a nonsmoker. they check your blood before hire. nicotine stays in your blood for up to a year. most companies that i know that do this it is because insurance costs are much higher for smokers. i don't see the sense in doing this as long as you pass along the extra cost to the smokers. no need to not hirer someone because they are a smoker.

    on the other side though. there has been research done that shows there is a corralation between smokers and more sick calls. just a thought.
  8. by   sbic56
    Originally posted by CougRN
    nicotine stays in your blood for up to a year.
    Is this what you meant by that statement? I did a google and found this article. I hadn't realized this about the nicotene binding sites, though, it is apparently old news. Amazing, isn't it?

    http://www.lungusa.org/press/medical/mednicbinding.html


    Nicotine Binding Sites In Blood May Give Clues To High Relapse Rate In Ex-Smokers
    September 30, 2003


    March 13, 1996

    NEW YORK A new study published by the American Lung Association may help explain why smokers who quit often have such a difficult time kicking the habit during their first year.

    Researchers in France found that smokers had twice as many nicotine binding sites on white blood cells compared with non-smokers. They also had a unique type of binding site which has a very high affinity for binding nicotine.

    People who had stopped smoking for less than a year had nicotine binding site patterns that were similar to those of smokers, while people who had quit for more than a year had binding site patterns that were similar to those of non-smokers.

    The nicotine binding sites, or receptors, are similar to a lock that nicotine fits into like a key, and may play a role in nicotine addiction, said James Snapper, M.D., president of the American Lung Association of Tennessee and Professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University in Nashville.

    Scientists have long known that there are specific nicotine receptors in the brain, he explained. The French researchers speculate that the nicotine binding sites on the white blood cells they studied are similar to such sites in the brain.

    They note that the persistence of a high number of nicotine binding sites in the first year after a person quits smoking corresponds to the very high rate of relapse in smoking seen during that time.

    The study appears in the March issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, published by the American Lung Association.

    An estimated 46 million Americans smoke, and smoking-related diseases claim the lives of an estimated 419,000 Americans each year. Although 70% of smokers want to stop smoking and 34% attempt to quit each year, only 2.5% succeed.

    The high rate of relapse is a consequence of nicotine dependence. "The more we understand nicotine addiction, the better we can understand how to help people who want to stop smoking," Dr. Snapper said. Currently, most smoking cessation drug therapies use nicotine itself, in a patch or gum, he said. "If further research shows that these nicotine binding receptors are indeed critical to nicotine addiction, scientists might be able to develop smoking cessation therapies that use agents other than nicotine to block the receptors."

    The French researchers tried to find out more about nicotine's effect on the brain by studying nicotine binding receptors found on white blood cells known as granulocytes. Their study included 30 people: 10 nonsmokers, 10 smokers and 10 ex-smokers five who had stopped smoking for less than one year, and five who had stopped smoking for more than a year.
  9. by   CougRN
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by sbic56
    [B]Is this what you meant by that statement? I did a google and found this article. I hadn't realized this about the nicotene binding sites, though, it is apparently old news. Amazing, isn't it?

    Actually, what i meant was that if your employer wants to test for nicotine it stays in your system for 1 year. So it's hard to fool them if they test for it. You can't just quit smoking for a short time. It will be there for a year.
  10. by   sbic56
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by CougRN
    [B]
    Originally posted by sbic56
    Is this what you meant by that statement? I did a google and found this article. I hadn't realized this about the nicotene binding sites, though, it is apparently old news. Amazing, isn't it?

    Actually, what i meant was that if your employer wants to test for nicotine it stays in your system for 1 year. So it's hard to fool them if they test for it. You can't just quit smoking for a short time. It will be there for a year.
    Wow. A year? That is unbelievable. Even more unbelievable that an employer would use these results to determine eligibility for employment. Could easily be used as an excuse to terminate an employee for a host of reasons. Add this to the list of reasons healthcare workers don't stay in the field. What other professions are such punitive measures inflicted upon? Ridiculous.
  11. by   PilotJim68
    Originally posted by gwenith
    Comedian Steve Martin is reputed to be a rabid anti-smoker and is credited with one of the best come back lines I have ever heard.

    When asked at dinner if he minded if someone smoked he replied "No do you mind if I f*rt!"

    Humour can be another way of confronting a problem without triggering either resistance or strong responses.

    LOL...I have used that one myself....I thought it was a great come back too.
  12. by   PilotJim68
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by CougRN
    [B]
    Originally posted by sbic56
    Is this what you meant by that statement? I did a google and found this article. I hadn't realized this about the nicotene binding sites, though, it is apparently old news. Amazing, isn't it?

    Actually, what i meant was that if your employer wants to test for nicotine it stays in your system for 1 year. So it's hard to fool them if they test for it. You can't just quit smoking for a short time. It will be there for a year.
    I have never really heard of a company actually testing for nicotine in the blood, what would they do with a nonsmoker who dips or chews tobacco? They dont smoke but yet they have high blood levels of nicotine. Just a thought.
  13. by   babs_rn
    Allergic to the adhesive in the patch. Scratch it right off every time. Gum eats holes in my tongue. Ditto for the lozenge. The spray is essentially nicotine in a pepper spray to put in your nose (which I'm sure is why they tell you not to drive for 5 minutes after squirting it in there!) Yeowch!!! Can't function for 15 minutes after that! Zyban makes me nearly homicidal. NEXT????

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