Skilled Care - page 2

by jadelpn 5,185 Views | 15 Comments Guide

There are a number of different types of skilled care facilities. Generally speaking, skilled care can be defined as a long term care facility which houses non medically acute patients, that do have medical needs that need to be... Read More


  1. 0
    I am currently a recent grad RN working in a SNF. I have been there 10 months. While I have learned some skills there, there is a limit on what you learn, due to the types/acuity of patients who go there and also the lack of training or mentoring. I work on the night shift with 60 patients and I am the only RN in the building. So if something happens (and something does every night), there's no one to help me or give me guidance if I don't know what to do. I worry about losing my license or getting fired all the time, since this facility uses nurses as a scape goat when something goes wrong.

    Furthermore, some of the RNs who work there give me a nasty attitude when I ask for help with a skill. For example, in nursing school I only had the opportunity to start an IV two times, and that is definitely not enough practice to be proficient at it, especially in dehydrated elderly people. So when I asked the RN supervisor for help in placing an IV, she gave me a nasty attitude, saying, "Oh you should have learned that in nursing school...why don't you know how to do that, you are an RN after all"...

    So, it's a good opportunity for a limited time, but within a year or less if you want to increase your skills you need to go to either a subacute, LTAC, or acute facility.
  2. 0
    Quote from PeacockMaiden
    I am currently a recent grad RN working in a SNF. I have been there 10 months. While I have learned some skills there, there is a limit on what you learn, due to the types/acuity of patients who go there and also the lack of training or mentoring. I work on the night shift with 60 patients and I am the only RN in the building. So if something happens (and something does every night), there's no one to help me or give me guidance if I don't know what to do. I worry about losing my license or getting fired all the time, since this facility uses nurses as a scape goat when something goes wrong.

    Furthermore, some of the RNs who work there give me a nasty attitude when I ask for help with a skill. For example, in nursing school I only had the opportunity to start an IV two times, and that is definitely not enough practice to be proficient at it, especially in dehydrated elderly people. So when I asked the RN supervisor for help in placing an IV, she gave me a nasty attitude, saying, "Oh you should have learned that in nursing school...why don't you know how to do that, you are an RN after all"...

    So, it's a good opportunity for a limited time, but within a year or less if you want to increase your skills you need to go to either a subacute, LTAC, or acute facility.
    That's too bad you don't get the support you need. I start nursing school in the fall and I am trying to be extremely open minded about jobs when I graduate. I know the market is tough right now so I am open to anything. It seems like SNF is the only option for most new grads in my area.

    It's great that you are working (so many new grads aren't) and you are almost at a year experience! Have you started looking into other jobs now that you've had some experience?
  3. 0
    Actually you are right i skilled person has better level of treatment and knows exactly what the problem is, he can better cure this instead of anyone else. I agree with you the whole article is quite informative and we need to understand these things for our own care otherwise we will be in danger.
  4. 0
    SNF's are nothing more over crowded glorified med-surg graveyards. I love how every now and then someone writes an article painting them as a great opportunity. Well; someone's got do it. Yes, there are probably a few out there there don't run the RN ragged with a ridiculous census, but few and far between. Just my opinion...
  5. 0
    Quote from tyvin
    SNF's are nothing more over crowded glorified med-surg graveyards. I love how every now and then someone writes an article painting them as a great opportunity. Well; someone's got do it. Yes, there are probably a few out there there don't run the RN ragged with a ridiculous census, but few and far between. Just my opinion...
    As a student, I thought I couldn't have gotten a better hands on clinical skill experience anywhere. But that's just me. And like everything else, there's the good and the not so good faciilities. Most employ LPN's. And rumor has it that the RN is run ragged with a ridiculous census just about everywhere.
  6. 0
    Quote from jadelpn
    As a student, I thought I couldn't have gotten a better hands on clinical skill experience anywhere. But that's just me. And like everything else, there's the good and the not so good faciilities. Most employ LPN's. And rumor has it that the RN is run ragged with a ridiculous census just about everywhere.

    Try doing it everyday with a real load...


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