shy girl - page 2

Im a 22 year old nursing student and im not a very talkative person and i was wondering what kind of nursing can i go into that doesnt require me talking alot ... Read More

  1. by   hikernurse
    Once you gain more knowledge and become more comfortable in the nursing role I bet your shyness will become less of a problem. You'll get a lot of experience as a student and most instructors/patients/nurses will understand that you feel uncomfortable.

    I'm shy too, but while nursing has everything to do with communicating, much of it can be one on one; which I find easier.
  2. by   Roy Fokker
    Quote from iluvmynavyman
    thank you guys so much i was actually considering changing my major to something less people friendly like accounting even though i hate it
    I just wanted to say that "Nursing will change you - and you won't even realise it sometimes!"

    I'm not really a 'shy' or 'bashful' person.
    And I won't say that "it's not a big deal" - because I know that it CAN be a big deal! I wasn't always so un-reserved... I used to be really shy before.

    I strongly encourage you getting more acquainted and more comfortable with yourself.... FIRST.

    THEN, start getting acquainted with the role of a nurse.


    Before you know it - BAM! You feel your shyness slowly departing!

    Always remember - "Quality" over "Quantity". It's not "how much you talk" but more "what you say when you open your mouth".


    cheers,
  3. by   ArmyMSN
    Quote from iluvmynavyman
    Im a 22 year old nursing student and im not a very talkative person and i was wondering what kind of nursing can i go into that doesnt require me talking alot


    thanks for the help,
    kiyana
    I feel for you. My nursing programs always seems to involve public speaking projects. I hated them - but somehow got through it. I still don't enjoy it - as I frequently have to give presentations in my current job.

    I know med-surg nightshift nurses/critical care nurses often can get through a shift with little dialogue - unless something occurs with their patients requiring coordination, discussion with other providers, family members.

    I wonder if your shyness is with large groups? I can see where home health nurses may get away with little discussion except teaching families and one-on-one interactions.

    BTW, your patients may appreciate your shyness - because it allows them to talk more - and they appreciate when people listen to them.

    I'd hate to see nursing lose a kind, gentle nurse just because she's shy.
  4. by   iluvmynavyman
    Quote from ArmyMSN
    I feel for you. My nursing programs always seems to involve public speaking projects. I hated them - but somehow got through it. I still don't enjoy it - as I frequently have to give presentations in my current job.

    I know med-surg nightshift nurses/critical care nurses often can get through a shift with little dialogue - unless something occurs with their patients requiring coordination, discussion with other providers, family members.

    I wonder if your shyness is with large groups? I can see where home health nurses may get away with little discussion except teaching families and one-on-one interactions.

    BTW, your patients may appreciate your shyness - because it allows them to talk more - and they appreciate when people listen to them.

    I'd hate to see nursing lose a kind, gentle nurse just because she's shy.
    I can speak one on one but its just underpressure i crack .. its werid because i can do my job and do it very well just dont ask me to talk while im doing it because nothing will come out
  5. by   DeLana_RN
    Please don't let this stop you from pursuing your dream, if that's what nursing is for you! I should know, I'm an introvert myself, and that's OK. In fact, when I told my mother that I wanted to go back to college in my early 30's to (finally) become a nurse, she tired to talk me out of it - she thought I'd be better suited to working in a lab (by myself, away from people). Problem: I would hate that, as I would other professions I might be well suited for such as accounting. Because all I ever wanted to be was a nurse, and because I wanted to work with people - not do research!

    And you know what? I've done fine with with it. I truly didn't like the high patient turnover on the med-surg/PCU floor in my first year, 8-12 patients per shift (counting admits/discharges) was just more than I cared for. However, I moved on to dialysis and really enjoyed getting to know my patients, teaching them, etc. Nobody ever called me shy there!

    My point: I think you will be just fine. However, even if you later find that you would prefer less interaction with patients, there are lots of possibilities for that in nursing as well: management, surgical nursing, etc. And no matter what kind of profession you're in, you will have to communicate with people!

    Good luck to you, follow your dreams!

    DeLana
  6. by   piper_for_hire
    There is a big difference between being shy and being introverted. Shyness is usually about awkwardness or being unsure about oneself. A little experience will clear this up. "Introvert" is really a general personality type. Introverts are usually do well more often in one-on-one situations than in group situations. We don't get much out of group discussions, so we have little experience with them. Just not our thing. According to stuff I've read and observed, extroverts dominate the world, so it often seems as though introverts are people who are one their way to being an extrovert - at least from the extrovert's perspective. Just not the case. The classic example is the extroverts are energized by a party where there are lots of people and introverts are drained by the same situation. Different strokes. There are some good books written on this subject so I'll shut up now before I write a thesis here!
  7. by   Chicklet2
    Hey how are you?? Well I'm 20 and now an LPN and I am shy and my nursing instructor said i would never be able to make it as a nurse b/c i'm quiet. I'm still shy but i love my job and at work i need to communicate to my patients and i think in some ways they like that i'm quiet instead of coming in there talking their ear off...
  8. by   bearsnurse
    shy girl you are not alone I have been an OR nurse for 10 years now. 4 years in the Philippines and 6 years in England. now I am working in the US. I must say it is interesting to see the cultural differences in each country that I have worked on. I find myself awkwardly shy in the US I don't know why but I am trying my very best to talk and increase the volume of my voice most especially with doing my time outs in surgery. I am just so soft spoken I realized it now here. My self confidence hasn't been the same as it was but I am hoping to overcome this to be effective it does take time to be comfortable with the role but I have been thinking of some options open... goodluck and I hope you will soon like me develop a little bit more courage in approaching colleagues and patients....
  9. by   BGgirl
    I know where you are coming from. I tend to be quieter/shy around people that I don't know very well. It takes me a while to get comfortable around people to where I will be more outspoken.

    In nursing school I was one who sat in the back and hated presenting in front of the class and when I was in clinicals, on many occassions my face would be bright red when speaking to my patients because I was embarassed/unusure of myself.

    I think being able to speak and communicate with your patients/other staff is a big part of nursing and I can honestly say that with experience comes confidence which will enable you to better communicate with your patients and other staff members.

    I feel that I am an integral part of my patients care so it has enabled me to be more outgoing and confident. You might be put in charge of your unit which will help you gain even more confidence in being an "authority" figure.

    Now 2.5 years down the road I can say that at work you would never know that I am shy. I am an advocate for my patient and will speak up to the dr or whoever I need to in order to enable them the best care and treatment that they can get. I've even had a nursing instructor tell me that one of her nursings students was intimidated by me. When I heard that I knew that I had really changed over the few years I've worked as a nurse. I was the one who was always intimidated by other staff memebers.

    Give yourself time........it will all come with practice and experience. Good luck to you.

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