Should teachers be CPR certified? - page 6

I was wondering if any of you think that teachers should be certified in CPR. A little girl in a neighboring town died last month while at school. My friend, who is a paramedic, said that chances... Read More

  1. by   Flynurse
    Originally posted by disher
    Instead mandating teachers to learn CPR. It might be more effective to train 911 operators to instruct callers on how to assess and begin CPR.
    I like that idea.
  2. by   igloorn93
    Yes I do. I can't believe that they aren't. I guess that since I don't have any children of my own I hadn't given it much thought, but I do think it should be a requirement, and it isn't hard to get either.
  3. by   MomNRN
    In our school district we offer CPR training and recertification on our in-service days. The district pays for and provides the training. We also have signs posted in each classroom listing CPR and Heimlich techniques.

    Unfortunately, nurses are considered a luxury item for districts. I recently heard that one district cut one nurse and another district cut hours for their high-school level nurse. Everytime money becomes a issue, and that is all the time, I cringe. I am glad I am no longer low-man on the totem pole.
  4. by   Robin61970
    I took First Aid and the majority of the others in my class were Elementary Ed majors so it is required here......thank goodness. YES YES YES.....teachers should know CPR and heimlich!!!!
  5. by   ShortFuse_LPN
    Originally posted by disher
    Instead mandating teachers to learn CPR. It might be more effective to train 911 operators to instruct callers on how to assess and begin CPR.
    What would have happened if the 911 operator had stayed on the line after dispatching the paramedics and talked the teacher through CPR?...... it wouldn't have hurt and it might have helped.
    What happens when the child is on the playground or some other place where there is no phone?
  6. by   litebrite
    My mother is a teacher and I think they should be certified. She has been teaching for over 30 years and never taken a CPR course. I did get her to take one last summer. I think day care's, schools, etc, any place that cares for children should have to take CPR. Especially, since at least where I live there are not always nurses in the school. Some rotate and aren't at the school for part of the day. I find that appalling as well. It will take for a child to die before they will change that, it's crazy. Like kids will only get hurt have a problem when the nurse is there, it makes no sense.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by disher
    Instead mandating teachers to learn CPR. It might be more effective to train 911 operators to instruct callers on how to assess and begin CPR.
    What would have happened if the 911 operator had stayed on the line after dispatching the paramedics and talked the teacher through CPR?...... it wouldn't have hurt and it might have helped.
    Not nearly good enough when you consider SECONDS count when a child has arrested. COME ON HOW HARD is this REALLY? ----and like previously mentioned, what if there is no phone handy? You have about 4 minutes til brain death occurs, am I right? How much time does it take to initiate respirations and if needed, chest compressions, compared to someone getting a phone and having to have a crash course over the phone on how to save a life? To me, this is a poor suggestion. A poor substitute for getting a basic skill everyone should have anyhow.
  8. by   Enabled
    Here in Florida there are many counties that do have the 911 operator stay with the person on the phone and help do an assessment and begin rescue breathing or CPR if needed. Many times here it is a small child who has fallen in a pool. Even when CPR has been started there have been more negative results than one would want to hear about. But then there are the success stories and when on the news of such events Iwish people would really take a look at how precious life really is. The same happened to a few Alzheimer's patients who had wandered away toward either a pool or retention pond. Again, because nothing has been started or known the down time their is a terrible loss.
    CPR could be made a part of the continuing education courses teachers have to take. Therefore it is required for work so it is tax deductible if someone wants to get down to pennies. Most teachers are rather younger as school systems don't want to pay the higher salaries of more experienced teachers and I would think that a percentage would want to know in the event a child went down, their own child had a problem, or another member of the faculty and staff. The cost is insignificant. Many people would spend more on a night out and spend about the same amount of time going out to a movie or dinner or both. Have it at the school on a teacher's conference day.
    Once the students are big enough to do compressions in regard to their own weight being a requirement then they to should be taught in PE. Members of teams should have all or at least a portion certified and then rotate the next year that way there is always someone who is in the know. Who knows someone taught just might save mine or your life if we were to visit a school and something happened.
  9. by   ShandyLynnRN
    ya know, that brought to mind something our school system does twice a year. It's called Camp Bandage. They have fire drills, get pretend bandages, get to see the life flight helicopter, AND get to learn the basics of CPR.

    My 6 year old came home from it a few months ago, and although it was very very elementary, he knew to call 911 and to "push on their chest and pinch their nose and breathe in their mouth".

    I remember going and "teaching" CPR to the kiddos when I was in nursing school as a break from a clinical day. They had a lot of fun and learned valuable tools.
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Now THERE is a great idea, Shandy!
  11. by   katscan
    I am a school nurse certified in CPR and BLS. We just got our AED in January. Teachers were given an option to be certified or not. I definitely think all ssecretaries who "cover" for the school nurse should be certified in both. I agree with one of the above posters that it adds one more thing for teachers to be responsible for, but who is with a student for the majority of the day? Why not be certified? I know that it will take me time to go to the gym, say, if someone arrested there. By the time I would get there, someone in charge could have already begun the process. I am only one person, and an arrest may be occurring during an acute asthma attack at the other end of the building. Sure 911 will be called, but someone needs to be able to step in and help at the very begining. I know it would make me more assured that we are safer as a school.
  12. by   nursedawn67
    Oh yeah I think teachers should be CPR certified, as well as CNA's....can you believe there are facilities that don't require that from CNA's? I think they should know that and the heimlich manuever. And as an added note: our facilty requires our activiities people to become a certified nursing assistant, they don't work the floor as one, but this way at outings and the such they can assist a resident with toileting or whatever.
  13. by   nursedawn67
    Originally posted by ShandyLynnRN
    ya know, that brought to mind something our school system does twice a year. It's called Camp Bandage. They have fire drills, get pretend bandages, get to see the life flight helicopter, AND get to learn the basics of CPR.

    My 6 year old came home from it a few months ago, and although it was very very elementary, he knew to call 911 and to "push on their chest and pinch their nose and breathe in their mouth".

    I remember going and "teaching" CPR to the kiddos when I was in nursing school as a break from a clinical day. They had a lot of fun and learned valuable tools.
    Our schools do the same thing for the kids, I just wish more kids would sign up for it. But I hear tell it is very informative for them.

close