Should nurses be forced to take charge against their will? - page 2

hi everyone! this is my first time posting here and i wanted to say that i'm glad i found this forum. this seems to be a great way to share support and information, and i look forward to reading... Read More

  1. by   withasmilelpn
    Maybe having to be charge shouldn't be part of the job requirement? No offence, I think saying that because nurses recieved training regarding a charge role does not mean they would be good at it. We all recieved training in OB. I don't know about you, but I am not cut out to be an OB nurse.

    We as nurses are first people, blessed with a variety of talents and shortcomings. We should work in the capacity that suits us (and our patients). Nursing is stressful enough.
  2. by   MomNRN
    Quote from withasmilelpn
    Maybe having to be charge shouldn't be part of the job requirement? No offence, I think saying that because nurses recieved training regarding a charge role does not mean they would be good at it. We all recieved training in OB. I don't know about you, but I am not cut out to be an OB nurse.

    We as nurses are first people, blessed with a variety of talents and shortcomings. We should work in the capacity that suits us (and our patients). Nursing is stressful enough.

    Very true. I wish some of the staff I work with could see your viewpoint. There are people, beyond the world of nursing, who are leaders and there are people who are followers.

    That is not to say that those who are followers are not intelligent, highly motivated people. It is just saying that there are those who are better and more comfortable at following than leading. Most of the "followers" will agree wholeheartedly that they don't like to be in charge. I don't understand why it would be forced upon them.

    Just because you aren't comfortable in being the charge nurse, doesn't mean you aren't qualified for it.
  3. by   scrubsnhugsRN
    this is a big issue right now where i work. we do not recieve any compisation related to being charge. right now the most experienced nurses on the floor are saying they refuse to be charge. so on day shift there are only three nurses who have been rotating charge. i think part of the reason is no compensation for more responsibility, more work, and stress. i personally dont do charge because i am new nurse, but i do recognise why they are refusing. we are not unionized so that doesnt play a role.
  4. by   MomNRN
    We get a whopping extra $1 per hour for being in charge.
  5. by   EmerNurse
    Buck an hour here too! 12 bucks a shift for all that extra grief just isn't worth it, that's for sure!
  6. by   MomNRN
    Quote from EmerNurse
    Buck an hour here too! 12 bucks a shift for all that extra grief just isn't worth it, that's for sure!
    I work in the ER too! If they increased the charge RN pay, to let's say $5 extra per hour, I might enjoy it more!
  7. by   SandraDeeRN
    Where I work, the unit director decides on who can be in charge on the off shifts. I have been a nurse for two years and was in charge six months after I started there. There are nurses I work with who have over 20 years of experience and refuse to take charge. I think it depends on your personality and how sure of yourself you are. Some people just don't like the role of the leader and would rather not do it and I think those type of people shouldn't be in charge then.
  8. by   elizabeth321
    I am not talking about taking a day charge position...I am talking about doing charge on shift or on the weekend or occassionlly to cover the regular charge on days.....I think nurses glorify charge....if someone freaks out at being in charge they likely are not coping well in their other roles...you may not want to be an OB nurse once you graduate but whatever you decide to do...you need to grow to do all roles that are required in that particular specialty. It makes for a healthier work place all the way around...IMHO

    Liz
  9. by   CHATSDALE
    if you don't want to take a turn at charge because of the added stress etc are you being fair to fellow nurses who may feel the same way...if you don't like it at least qualify yourself . you never know when you will come to work and the other nurses are your junior in seniority or if theyy also refuse to work in that postion
  10. by   lee1
    Quote from luv2dive
    hi everyone!
    this is my first time posting here and i wanted to say that i'm glad i found this forum. this seems to be a great way to share support and information, and i look forward to reading many more of your posts.
    i was curious to know how everyone feels about staff nurses being forced into the role of taking charge. not neccessarily brand new nurses, but nurses who have had at least 2 - 3 years experience on a particular unit, but simply desire to remain in the staff nurse position without the added stress and responsibility of taking charge.
    i feel that it's not always the # of years of experience, or level of clinical skill that automatically qualifies one for the role of charge nurse. some people by nature are more assertive, handle stress better, and adapt well to leadership positions. others do not.
    what does everyone think about this? rc
    in my facility charge nurse must be rotated. you must also take a charge nurse orientation and be at least experienced enough to be able to take charge. at least, in my opinion, 1 year experience should be necessary.
    now, the big thing is that when you are in charge it is of a whole unit generally. soooo, how many patients are you also personally responsible for? do you not have any patients, or the lightest assignment which can be how many???????
  11. by   SandraDeeRN
    Quote from lee1
    In my facility charge nurse must be rotated. You must also take a charge nurse orientation and be at least experienced enough to be able to take charge. At least, in my opinion, 1 year experience should be necessary.
    Now, the big thing is that when you are in charge it is of a whole unit generally. SOOOO, how many patients are you also personally responsible for? Do you NOT have any patients, OR the lightest assignment which can be HOW MANY???????
    Where I work you do not get extra orientation to be in charge. If you're in charge you still have a full patient assignment which is about 6 patients and if one of the LPN's are working, you need to cover them so it's almost like having 12. We do not have the staff to allow us not to have an assignment while being in charge, unfortunately.
  12. by   JeannieT
    I am a new nurse training with a very seasoned nurse who has been a charge nurse in orthopedic unit for 2 years prior to this gig. We are both in our 40's.

    One day we came in and she found out she was the charge nurse (in addition to 4 PCU patients and me, her trainee) - she is a traveler right now (due to be an employee soon). She kept saying "clinical lead" and then "charge nurse" so I finally asked her what the difference was.

    She said, clinical lead gets paid (as in our regular clinical lead who was sick that day and gets $3.65 more an hour as it is her full time position) and here was my nurse filling in and she said she doesn't get anything - so she calls it charge nurse. We had a good laugh over it and she takes BS very well.

    However, I have NEVER worked in any field where one of the employees got to play manager for no extra pay on a rotating/regular basis. It is one thing when a manager in an office goes on vacation and puts "so and so" in charge for the week. However, no important decisions or tasks are ever taken on by that person because it is not their fulltime job and they are not being compensated for the task.

    Nursing is really a very strange world. Nurses need to recognize how much they are being used for the benefit of administration. Professionals DEMAND respect in every aspect of their work, from the tangible to the intangible.
  13. by   anniev
    They stick a little "c" by your name, when I committed to my NM she said "It's not a b**bie prize I trust you", But it still would be nice to actually be asked.

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