Should nurses be able to listen to music at work? - page 6

On numerous occasions, I've observed nurses playing music from their computers. Some of them are managers, which doesn't necessarily concern me since they aren't directly caring for patients. ... Read More

  1. by   Davey Do
    Quote from OldDude
    You should try the fart CD
    OldDude has a solo on it, performing his flatulent version of "Smokin' in the Boys Room"!

    fart-cd-jpg
  2. by   mmc51264
    In a busy med/surg floor, it is impractical, If I have a few minutes to chart, I go in the doctor's room (they are usually there on the weekends) and play something softly. I think it is extremely unprofessional that people walk around with their blue tooth earbuds or regular ones. We have pts that don't like that we carry work phones! Except when I give them my # in case the call doesn't go through when they ring the bell....
    I love listening to music while I work, like school work, but it's not really doable where I work. I love the idea of having something playing in ICU.
  3. by   AJJKRN
    Now that's entertainment OldDude!

    For or whatever reason the quote function didn't work this time...
    Last edit by AJJKRN on Feb 13
  4. by   michaRN
    Well, I guess it doesn't matter. I feel relax and cool when music is on. Obviously, if the patient or relative does not like listening to then switch it off. ICU patient is sedated and they don't care, but there are studies that music stimulates patient and help in recovery.
  5. by   Hygiene Queen
    Reading these responses just kinda reinforces to me that I gotta be where the music is. That's just how my brain works. Maybe that's why I loved psych and, especially, my dementia patients.

    Anyway, just want to also say that the title of this thread bothers me a bit. "Should nurses be able to..." It sounds like we're a bunch of little kids that need permission to do anything, no matter how trivial.

    Nurses are trusted with some big-time stuff. I would expect we could allow nurses to use their good judgment as to whether they can listen to music or not.

    I mean, I'm sure Old Dude uses discretion with his fart CD...
  6. by   DoeRN
    I don't do direct care but I don't mind music being played. It relaxes me and I can concentrate more.
  7. by   NurseSpeedy
    Very quiet, very soft, kind of like ‘background' music I don't see anything wrong with. Half the time something of that variety is playing overhead anyway in the halls (I actually never noticed it until one day it seemed to be turned UP, caught my attention, and I was informed it was always playing, just this time it was loud enough for me to notice it while working).

    Louder music, especially someone's own downloaded music should be saved for areas outside the patient care areas or anywhere the family could hear it.

    The one that I find more of an issue with is the nurse wearing headphones for music when charting, oblivious to their phone ringing right next to them or their patient lights lit up like a Christmas tree. I think they may realize the code being called not from the phone or overhead blasting it, but by seeing the rush of staff and the code cart rushing by then in the hallway.
  8. by   WestCoastSunRN
    In our ICU, we play music -- if/when we can ask the patient, we play what he/she wants .... or we ask the family. Sometimes we have to guess. Sometimes it's not music but a TV station. When we have to turn it off bc it's distracting and we are trying to think, we do. There is so much dehumanization in an ICU -- both for patients and staff, music helps us remember we are human. It's never been an issue if a nurse or doc needed to turn it off. We don't rock out when we're resuscitating people. I'd wager a lot of the time the patient's taste in music is different than the nurse's. Oh well. It's about them, not us.
  9. by   Leader25
    Damn you are stressed and judgemental phew, have drink or a chocolate stop eating thorns.I find music better than off key humming though.And I have worked fast paced ICU also. It is whatever floats your boat. Sometimes I just stick the old steth in my ears.
  10. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Wuzzie
    Do you seriously think that people are incapable of doing both? I doubt people are rocking out to death metal. Soft music isn't going to interfere with one's ability to hear alarms unless they already have a hearing problem (from the death metal). Now headphones are another story.
    We've fired people for wearing headphones at work as well. The problem is, they were ignoring lights and alarms, and they were wearing the headphones while interacting with patients and family members. The patients and family members are the ones who complained. People may be capable of hearing call lights, alarms and the confused patient yelling "Help! Help!" But they weren't responding to them. I think it's a real issue.

    My informal, anecdotal and totally unscientific poll of the nurses with whom I work regularly confirms what I thought to begin with: those who are listening to music (or, even worse, watching Netflix) aren't the ones to jump up and answer the call lights, deal with the alarms or check on the confused patients. Instead, they continue to sit while someone else does the above. For that reason alone, our manager has banned listening to music at work.
  11. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    We've fired people for wearing headphones at work as well. The problem is, they were ignoring lights and alarms, and they were wearing the headphones while interacting with patients and family members. The patients and family members are the ones who complained. People may be capable of hearing call lights, alarms and the confused patient yelling "Help! Help!" But they weren't responding to them. I think it's a real issue.

    My informal, anecdotal and totally unscientific poll of the nurses with whom I work regularly confirms what I thought to begin with: those who are listening to music (or, even worse, watching Netflix) aren't the ones to jump up and answer the call lights, deal with the alarms or check on the confused patients. Instead, they continue to sit while someone else does the above. For that reason alone, our manager has banned listening to music at work.
    I hope you noticed that I wasn't supporting wearing headphones. That is definitely crossing a line. I'm sorry you work with a bunch of lazy, immature twits. I can assure you that having music on does not in any way make me work less. In fact, it energizes me.

    And Netflix?!! You have got to be kidding me!
  12. by   JKL33
    Quote from Hygiene Queen
    Anyway, just want to also say that the title of this thread bothers me a bit. "Should nurses be able to..."
    Ditto.
  13. by   kbrn2002
    If the music is at an audible level for patients to hear I wouldn't have a problem if it's music that the patient likes. I work in a SNF and sometimes the best way to sooth an agitated resident is with some music from their era. Big band music as well as Frank Sinatra radio are usually hits. One lovely little lady that is decidedly tone deaf will belt out Christmas carols at the top of her lungs any time we put them on for her. Sure improves her mood, though it is pretty hard on our ears.

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