Should I Carry Malpractice (Liability) Insurance? - page 12

by sirI Admin | 207,680 Views | 203 Comments

This question comes up frequently and is asked of me quite often, "should I carry malpractice insurance?" Many nurses are covered under their own individual liability insurance carrier. Many more are not. I am.......... Are you??... Read More


  1. 1
    From your screen name, I am going to leap and assume you are an L&D nurse or women's health specialists. I can appreciate your comments, as I too have this background. I still believe if you are doing the best to provide care based on AWHONN, ACOG standards, and have done a thorough documentation of events, ultimately, the hospital insurance should cover you in the event, even if the outcome was not as good as you would have liked. I have been a nurse for 25 years, and, although I do not have the additional 25 years of knowledge to fall back on, I do believe (from personal experience), knowing what the scope of practice is, and knowing the standards for the professional organizations that support your practice as well as hospital policy will be what is necessary to protect a nurse from liability. It is true that others have selective memory, and physicians are not your friend if it's us vs. them.
    deidreparkinson likes this.
  2. 3
    Quote from mgrtype
    if a nurse is following hospital policy, and an event occurs, the hospital liability insurance would cover her and any costs associated with a lawsuit.
    it is important to check the type of liability coverage you have through your employer, and to evaluate whether you should purchase an additional professional liability insurance policy because defending an allegation of malpractice can be financially draining. your employer's policy may cover you, but only up to a point.
    your
    employer's policy is designed to fit their own needs and protect their interests first. if you have your own individual protection, you will have the benefit of your own representation, when needed, that is concerned specifically with your interests.

    remember...

    all malpractice insurance policies have limits of liability. if you are only covered by your employer's insurance, other defendants employed at your entity may and probably do share your liability limits under the same policy.

    if you, as well as others, are named in a suit, your legal costs, including any settlement, could exceed your employer's shared liability limits. this would mean out-of-pocket expense's for you.


  3. 2
    Much would depend on the organizaton a nurse works for. I think we will agree to disagree here. I do not want to carry an additional policy, just more for the lawyers to go after............
    deidreparkinson and sirI like this.
  4. 1
    Question: Should certified nursing assistants get covered?

    Thanks.
    sirI likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from Birdbr
    Question: Should certified nursing assistants get covered?

    Thanks.
    Hello, Birdbr and thank you for your question.

    It is my opinion that yes, CNAs should be covered. You can get free online quotes from http://www.hpso.com/professional-lia...ns-covered.jsp . Premiums are around $50/year.

    LTC is a highly litigious area and CNAs are found there in large numbers. The liability for CNAs in that environment is one that having adequate coverage is a must.
  6. 2
    [quote=mgrtype;3960805]From your screen name, I am going to leap and assume you are an L&D nurse or women's health specialists. I can appreciate your comments, as I too have this background. I still believe if you are doing the best to provide care based on AWHONN, ACOG standards, and have done a thorough documentation of events, ultimately, the hospital insurance should cover you in the event, even if the outcome was not as good as you would have liked. I have been a nurse for 25 years, and, although I do not have the additional 25 years of knowledge to fall back on, I do believe (from personal experience), knowing what the scope of practice is, and knowing the standards for the professional organizations that support your practice as well as hospital policy will be what is necessary to protect a nurse from liability. It is true that others have selective memory, and physicians are not your friend if it's us vs. them.[/quote


    Your capability to perform tasks perfectly can be altered when rushed!! Not having malpractise insurance for yourself, is like going to work blindfolded and nude!! You're anything but objective, if/when you have participated in an "incident". The lawyers for patients, facilities, etc. aren't looking out for you, believe me (not that I've had to experience such a thing, thank goodness).

    You need a professional with knowledge of how laws work, how Judges see circumstances, and what's best for YOU. It says a lot for nurses, that the premium for our protection by the most utilized insurance program is so low. But don't rest back on others' laurels! You need your own representation in legal maneuvers; and you can bet hospitals pay big bucks for theirs.......

    I think that nurses who believe that hospitals/employers will protect them in very costly lawsuits, is mistaken and implies a need to place them in a parental role - NOT!!
    talaxandra and RkfdNurse1 like this.
  7. 3
    i am nowhere as eloquent as the former nurses who have posted.

    all i can say is..................yes........always have had it and will have it till they take my stethescope out of my cold dead hands.
    RkfdNurse1, lamazeteacher, and sirI like this.
  8. 1
    Hummmm interesting topic. I do not and have never had my own Malpractice Insurance and have been a nurse for 30 years. I've never been named in a patient legal suit despite having worked in a large trauma center. I say never named in patient legal suit but did have an "interesting" suit brought against me as well as 2 of the nurses I worked with. Another nurse who was assigned to me (I was the OR Evening Coordinator) brought a civil suit against us for the sum of 30 million dollars! Not that's not a typo. We were in report, she stood up and said "you didn't wish me a Happy Hanukkah". I said, "Oh, I'm sorry, Happy Hanukkah" and went on with our report. Some months later she was terminated after compiling a number of safety infractions. I was not involved with her termination process as she'd left the evening shift by then. Shortly after that we were investigated for anti-semitism. After the investigator gathered the facts the suit was rejected. No real point here just something that comes to mind when someone mentions malpractice insurance.
    lamazeteacher likes this.
  9. 3
    I'd like to apologize to NCFlyGirl, for the rudeness of the (possibly) Jewish person with whom she once worked. Since you may not know many Jewish people, I'd like you to know that most of is don't expect to be wished a "Happy Hannukkah". It is really a less important celebration, but due to the Christmas lavishness, Jewish families try to make it special so their children won't resent being Jewish. I discovered that I was Jewish when I was 8 years old, and a neighborhood child called me a "dirty" Jew. That was during WW II.

    Anti-semitism does exist, but the incident you describe is definitely not indicative of it. Usually it is hidden, but causes prejudicial treatment, such as being excluded from membership of a social club. I wish prejudice didn't exist, and that people were accepted on their own merit, but that is an ideal that isn't likely to happen in my lifetime.

    When I announced that I would teach the nurses I supervised at a Home Health agency in VA, I was discouraged from doing that. My superior administrative nurse finally said, "They can't learn". I replied, "They are learning. You should see their charting now". After it was shown to her, the response she gave was, "Now they'll want more money!" I was flabbergasted..... You can guess what population it was that I taught....... a real southern experience.

    I've not thought of my religion as a persecuted group in this country, since then. Others have it far worse!
    GrnTea, talaxandra, and RkfdNurse1 like this.
  10. 0
    When choosing malpractice insurance, carefully examine coverage. I have carried it for 28/30 years of my career. When I was examining fees, attorney fee reimbursement was less than 50% of the going hourly rate for attorneys in the area in which I live. Pay a little more for better protection!


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top