Should I accept a SNF position as a new grad even though this is not the field I want?

  1. Hi everyone,

    I am a new grad nurse who graduated Dec 2017. I was offered an RN position at a SNF with starting pay $44/hr in the Bay Area, CA. Full benefits and 401K. However the average RN to patient ratio is 1:16. The patients non-acute and I was told that the position was mostly passing meds, occasionally IV, and other very low key skills. The orientation period is only 4 days.

    I have not heard back at all from any other places that I have applied to and the only interviews that I have managed to get were from LTC/SNF. So far, this position sounds the best.

    Should I accept this job even though I know for sure that once I enter the job I would already be looking for other jobs on the side (L&D or more acute positions)?
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   SaltySarcasticSally
    I would. 1:16 is actually really good for LTC. Plus any nursing experience is better than none! But I would ask for more than 4 days if you weren't an LPN previously.
  4. by   beekee
    Yes. You should take it. The alternative is to be unemployed and do no skills for $0 per hour.
  5. by   Davey Do
    I graduated as an LPN one week and started a job, in a LTC facility, as a CNA the next week. From there I worked as an LPN when a position came open.

    The hospital where I took my LPN clinicals hired me three months later for their new psych wing.

    Yep. You can transition anywhere if you work at it and the Fates be.
  6. by   JBudd
    No other offers? take it! I only make $48 with a masters and 37 years experience (maybe I should move to California? lol)
  7. by   VivaLasViejas
    Yes, you should take it, and stay with it for at least 1-2 years. It will give you good experience and teach you a lot about prioritization as well as technical skills. By the way, $44/hour is FANTASTIC pay for a new grad. I never made anywhere near that much during my career, and I've only been out of nursing for four years.

    Best of luck in whatever you decide to do.
  8. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from JBudd
    No other offers? take it! I only make $48 with a masters and 37 years experience (maybe I should move to California? lol)
    That's only a good idea if you know someone very old who plans to leave you real estate when they die.
  9. by   not.done.yet
    Yes, you should take it. California is a notoriously tough market to break into, particularly if you are an ASN graduate, not a BSN. That is a very exciting job offer and you will definitely learn a lot, including super important things like time management, triage, assessment and the like.

    Congratulations!
  10. by   Crystal-Wings
    Quote from JBudd
    No other offers? take it! I only make $48 with a masters and 37 years experience (maybe I should move to California? lol)
    Everything is expensive here in the bay area. It costs at least $1,000 a month to rent a ROOM. You're looking at about $3,000 a month to rent a one bedroom apartment.
  11. by   JBudd
    Quote from Crystal-Wings
    Everything is expensive here in the bay area. It costs at least $1,000 a month to rent a ROOM. You're looking at about $3,000 a month to rent a one bedroom apartment.
    I was just joking.... my mortgage is paid off this next February. I'm not going anywhere! Except on vacation I did work 3 years at UCSF though.
  12. by   mmc51264
    I worked for 10 months in LTC rehab. It was invaluable experience! Time management, geriatric population, orthopedics, PT stuff. The best part was, when I applied for a new grad position, I was still considered a new grad for a year, so I had experience when I started the job I have now that I love.
    LTC was not horrible and it is a paycheck.
  13. by   mrsboots87
    I started in a LTC/SNF for my first 7 months (worked there as a CNA for 6 months before that). I was offered a job in acute care after that but stayed around PRN at the SNF for another 8 months because I actually really enjoyed the job. It just wasn't stimulating enough for me.

    It was invaluable experience. You learn how to manage your time well and move very fast while still Bri from accurate. You learn how to assess well for change in status or injuries because there is no rapid team or doctor on site. You learn a decent amount about wound care and various dressing changes that you might not learn much about elsewhere. You learn a lot of common medications as well as off the wall ones. And you get to help an old population of people who no longer get to live in their home. It's very humbling and, most of the time, very enjoyable to work with that population.

    Plus, it beats making no money and getting no experience.
  14. by   fibroblast
    In TX you would have 1:34, 2 CNA's, three if you are lucky. I believe the ratio's, lack there of are different.
    Last edit by fibroblast on Jan 24

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