Should all nursing students be required to be a CNA for one year? - page 3

Okay, please dont take my head off......but I hear/see so many students/new nurses regret the career path for whatever the reason maybe. My question is......Should all future nurses be required by... Read More

  1. by   LadyT618
    I don't think it is necessary for students to be a CNA, neither do I think it should be required by law, prior to entering nursing school. If you cannot learn the basics that are taught in Fundamental of Nursing (where I was taught CNA duties and still do them up to this day, my last semester of nursing school), then perhaps bedside nursing is not for you. I don't think this person should quit nursing all together, but there is definitely a place for that person in the field. But to say they should be a CNA for a year prior to entering nursing school, I think it may turn people off from becoming an RN and that would be a shame, since being an RN is not only about being able to perform CNA duties.
  2. by   SophieMae
    Sorry Jim but I think you mis-understand......the question was from the stand point of "CNA basic nursing"..........if this is the low man on the totem pole, then this is the basic patient care, is it not. And Jim I am sure you are a professional that does not mind getting "your hands dirty" but to be honest we all know at least one RN, most likely in our work place and no doubt on our shift that either wont or does not know the first thing about this basic nursing.
  3. by   *PICURN*
    Personally, I don't think it should be REQUIRED, however I think it should be strongly recommended. With the waiting list for nursing programs being so long, I definately think that being a CNA during your wait would be beneficial.

    I was a CNA the last year of my nursing program, and it makes a nursing student MUCH more comfortable with basic patient care.
  4. by   Achoo!
    my school requires us to do the CNA program before entering the ADN program. We don't have to become certified or work as a CNA, but we did 3 weeks in a hospital learning the basics.
  5. by   christel
    I dont think nursing students should be required to become a CNA first b/c
    1. The CNA programs in (fresno) are too hard to get into. There are over 100 people competing for 20 spots. ( i've tried)
    2. I just dont have $700-$900 dollars to pay for one either as a college student.
  6. by   Spidey's mom
    No, not a requirement to be a CNA for a year.

    I learned CNA skills my first semester in school. Everyone is a little timid about learning to care so intimately for patients. It takes awhile for CNA's to feel comfortable too. Maybe they should be required to take a class to get them comfortable with patient care before they become CNA's.

    It should be up to each individual person if they wish to go this route. I didn't see any advantage for me. Many people in my nursing class took the CNA class the summer before we started school. (I've told this story before so sorry if you've heard it) .. .I asked RN friend who was mentoring me if I should take a CNA class and she told me no, take the summer off and enjoy my family because nursing school was intense. And besides, CNA skills are learned at the beginning and when you do your clinicals, you are essentially doing CNA stuff along with learning assessment skills when you first hit the floor.

    Where I work there are usually two RN's and two CNA's and we work together as a team. We help make beds, empty urinals, etc., . . .

    I went into nursing with no experience in taking care of patients either and it was a hurdle to jump over - that intimacy - but we all have to jump it and I didn't need a CNA class to help me do that.

    Everyone should be free to make their own choice but I see no real benefit for me to have it mandated.

    steph
  7. by   mattsmom81
    Should it be required ? NO but...

    I'm an old dinosaur diploma RN. We were 'strongly encouraged' to work as techs (different duties/grades of NA's depending on where we were in the program) in our off time during our 3 year nurse training program. We earned pocket $$ and learned at the same time. Only a few chose not to and I think they missed out on a whole lot of mentoring and OJT IMO.

    This was an advantage, working and learning in a big teaching hospital. I feel many of today's new grads would greatly benefit from this type education, but it has been discarded largely due to the push for BSN/classroom over OJT clinical hours. But, IMHO was all good.

    Our medical students often worked as orderlies as well...and later they had limited 'house officer' paid duties...all good experience. I don't know any, docs or nurses, who regret doing this.
    Last edit by mattsmom81 on Feb 12, '05
  8. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from mattsmom81
    I'm an old dinosaur diploma RN. We were 'strongly encouraged' to work as techs (different duties/grades of NA's depending on where we were in the program) in our off time during our 3 year nurse training program. We earned pocket $$ and learned at the same time. Only a few chose not to and I think they missed out on a whole lot of mentoring and OJT IMO.

    This was an advantage, working and learning in a big teaching hospital. I feel many of today's new grads would greatly benefit from this type education, but it has been discarded largely due to the push for BSN/classroom over OJT clinical hours. But, IMHO was all good.

    Our medical students often worked as orderlies as well...and later they had limited 'house officer' paid duties...all good experience. I don't know any, docs or nurses, who regret doing this.
    Actually you have a good point here . . one of our docs was an orderly during school and he says was trained well by the nurses . . .his handwriting is READABLE and he writes THANK YOU after his orders . . he cleans up after a delivery while the nurse tends to the patients .. including taking the bloody instruments and placenta to the appropriate place, picking up linen, putting the bed back together. In the ER he places foleys and gets his own instruments if it is busy to do stitches and other things. He gives the credit to his time as an orderly and the training of the nurses.

    He may however just be a nice guy. Another doc who did the same training does not have legible writing, etc.

    Maybe it is not the experience but what kind of person you are.

    Regardless, it shouldn't be mandated.

    steph
  9. by   LadyT618
    Quote from stevielynn
    No, not a requirement to be a CNA for a year.

    I learned CNA skills my first semester in school. Everyone is a little timid about learning to care so intimately for patients. It takes awhile for CNA's to feel comfortable too. Maybe they should be required to take a class to get them comfortable with patient care before they become CNA's.

    It should be up to each individual person if they wish to go this route. I didn't see any advantage for me. Many people in my nursing class took the CNA class the summer before we started school. (I've told this story before so sorry if you've heard it) .. .I asked RN friend who was mentoring me if I should take a CNA class and she told me no, take the summer off and enjoy my family because nursing school was intense. And besides, CNA skills are learned at the beginning and when you do your clinicals, you are essentially doing CNA stuff along with learning assessment skills when you first hit the floor.

    Where I work there are usually two RN's and two CNA's and we work together as a team. We help make beds, empty urinals, etc., . . .

    I went into nursing with no experience in taking care of patients either and it was a hurdle to jump over - that intimacy - but we all have to jump it and I didn't need a CNA class to help me do that.

    Everyone should be free to make their own choice but I see no real benefit for me to have it mandated.

    steph
    I couldn't have said it better myself!!!
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    but to be honest we all know at least one RN, most likely in our work place and no doubt on our shift that either wont or does not know the first thing about this basic nursing
    I saw both LPNs and RNs that are like this, which is why i think a CNA course should be recommended, by not a law.
  11. by   Wehwee
    In my first semester of nursing school I was scared to death to even walk into a patient room when I got into clinicals.... I took a job as a PCT (similar to a CNA) during my second semester and WHAT a difference! It increased my confidence, taught me alot of skills, got me comfortable with patients, their family members, and being around other members of the healthcare team. It made things realistic to me. I had these rose colored glasses on about how glamorous nursing was going to be.... being a PCT was a reality check for me. You know at that point whether you will make it as a nurse or not... better to find out then, rather than when you graduate.

    I'm in my final practicum now and I see a complete, total diference between myself and my friends who didn't have to/choose to work during nursing school.... I'm far more confident and 'critical thinking savvy' than they are... and that's going to make them more stressed when they get out in the field.....
  12. by   Hairstylingnurse
    Would it be beneficial yea, should it be mandatory, h$%# no. Unless you want to see an even worse nursing shortage, don't even think mandatory. I did it for 6 weeks while waiting for my nclex results, and wouldn't do it again. I have the utmost respect for the "good" cna's that are out there. I don't even want to do thier job as I'm sure most of them don't want my job.
  13. by   Wehwee
    ya know... I didn't even have to pay to go to CNA school... I just went to the hospital after my first semester of nursing school and said "Hey, I can do hospital corners and wipe @$$... hire me?" and they did. Starting at 13.50 an hour with no experience but that first semester of nursing school....

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