Shabbos/Religious Observances - page 8

As I begin the applications process for nursing schools, I have one huuuuge concern - my religious obligations. I am not permitted to work/attend school, etc. from sunset Friday nights until an hour... Read More

  1. by   texasmommy
    A couple of people asked specific questions; I will hopefully answer those tonight or tomorrow morning!
  2. by   VivaLasViejas
    I never understood those restrictions either, Tweety, and I'm Catholic!

    At least, I was..........nowadays, I guess I can't even call myself a Christian, since I don't practice any religion. I believe with every fiber of my being that there is a God and that His Son, Jesus, is my best friend as well as my Savior, but as I've aged, I've stopped believing that He can be confined to any one church or tradition. I also don't understand the religions that forbid dancing, movies, music, or other sources of pleasure, because the God I believe in loves to see His creatures happy! He loves to hear our songs and see the joy on our faces, because happy people are usually grateful people---at least, I am, and I'm grateful to Him as the source of all the good things in my life.

    That said, I respect the right of every other human being to worship---or not---in the manner he or she chooses, and to be permitted to exercise freedom of religion without regard to the convenience of one's employer.

    Just my two pence worth.
  3. by   morte
    my (admittedly limited) understanding is that some of the food proscriptions had nothing to do with religion/spiritual things but were health related, and codified into the Bible....
  4. by   texasmommy
    Quote from morte
    my (admittedly limited) understanding is that some of the food proscriptions had nothing to do with religion/spiritual things but were health related, and codified into the bible....
    that's a very common misconception - many people assume the prohibition against pork, for example, had to do with avoiding [color=#0000cc]trichinosis. the laws of kashrus are more spiritual than physical. they too, are complex and observed at a multitude of levels with varying interpretations.
  5. by   lpnstudentin2010
    Quote from mjlrn97
    I also don't understand the religions that forbid dancing, movies, music, or other sources of pleasure, because the God I believe in loves to see His creatures happy! He loves to hear our songs and see the joy on our faces, because happy people are usually grateful people---at least, I am, and I'm grateful to Him as the source of all the good things in my life.

    a bit of info here....if you are speaking of the nazarene denomination, which is the one i know of that did this, it has with in the past 5 or 10 years or so changed these rules.


    I go to a nazarene college and they used to not be able to do these things and now we can i asked why and was told that these things changed in the docterine.
  6. by   texasmommy
    Quote from bagladyrn
    Texasmommy - I'd be really interested if you could post a few guidelines on the forum concerning what the caregiver should know or be sensitive to when caring for Orthodox patients. It would be helpful for many of us.
    A particular question that comes to mind from what I do understand - would restrictions of the Sabbath preclude use of the call system or a PCA pump (with the patient controlled dosing) during that time, or is that allowable related to the patient's condition?
    This particular question would have to be posed to a competant Orthodox rabbi. I spent two Shabboses in the hospital when I gave birth to my daughter and my younger son, and I had my husband stay with me and notify the nurses' station personally so I wouldn't have to use the call system. As far as a PCA pump, it really depends on the situation. Check out www.askmoses.com for live 24/6 chat with orthodox rabbis - they can definitely give you plenty of insight! Hope that was helpful!
  7. by   Agnus
    Quote from texasmommy
    This particular question would have to be posed to a competant Orthodox rabbi. I spent two Shabboses in the hospital when I gave birth to my daughter and my younger son, and I had my husband stay with me and notify the nurses' station personally so I wouldn't have to use the call system. As far as a PCA pump, it really depends on the situation. Check out www.askmoses.com for live 24/6 chat with orthodox rabbis - they can definitely give you plenty of insight! Hope that was helpful!
    Once more for anyone who might miss interpret; I am just trying to understand. If you ever find you do not want to answer my questions please feel free not to answer. They are asked only to advance my understanding.

    Were you not requiring your husband to work. It seems you could have save both of you work by pushing a button. OK I get it. Pushing a button is work in your religion. But it would seem to me that walking down to the nurses station to deliver a message that you needed help would also be work??! Help, me out if you will.

    Again I am trying to understand from the lay believer's perspective. Thank you for the referral to moses.com. I will explore this.
    Last edit by Agnus on Dec 2, '07
  8. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from texasmommy
    that's a very common misconception - many people assume the prohibition against pork, for example, had to do with avoiding [color=#0000cc]trichinosis. the laws of kashrus are more spiritual than physical. they too, are complex and observed at a multitude of levels with varying interpretations.
    that's what my mother used to always tell me. she viewed old jewish laws as health laws and so she said that as long as you cooked the pork well it accomplished the same goal. she only made bacon once in awhile, or else it was just something we got at a restaurant, i don't know. she saw being jewish as her cultural identity, and that meant working hard, valueing education and learning, becoming successful, and not celebrating christmas. plus respecting parents, family values, instilling guilt in children if they didn't call often enough.
  9. by   FireStarterRN
    One thing that was most important was the yearly Passover feast, but we never even observed the no leavened bread rule during that week. Chanukah was basically a substitute for Christmas.
  10. by   HM2VikingRN
    Quote from Tweety
    Eight pages of talking religion without a TOS violation? Can it be true???
    Its Amazing.....One of the best discussions I have ever read here...
  11. by   vashtee
    Quote from texasmommy
    that's a very common misconception - many people assume the prohibition against pork, for example, had to do with avoiding [color=#0000cc]trichinosis. the laws of kashrus are more spiritual than physical. they too, are complex and observed at a multitude of levels with varying interpretations.
    yes, this is the way i learned it from my rabbi, too. any interpretation that connects to health concerns are merely speculation. no one knows for sure why the laws exist - only that they do.
  12. by   TazziRN
    i recently had a home care pt who grew up observant, and i asked her about the taboos about having dairy and meat at the same meal. i didn't understand that one, i thought that dietary laws were based on the religion. she explained that they're health-related, and it made sense: dairy doesn't mix well in the stomach with a lot of things.
  13. by   vashtee
    Meaning no disrespect to any Jewish women of earlier generations, but many of the women of my mother's generation grew up with knowledge of how to do Jewish traditions, but not necessarily why they were done. (tradition!) They were expected to keep a Jewish home, but their husbands were more often the ones in the synagogue. Torah study was almost unheard of for women. Times have changed.

    Another consideration is that in our secular society, especially in the post-Holocaust era where assimilation was a primary goal for many Jews, to give a religious answer to a question may not be as readily accepted as a "rational", scientific answer.

    The prohibition against mixing meat and dairy is from the bible. It has to do with humane treatment of an animal, and nothing at all to do with health concerns. "You shall not boil a kid in it's mother's milk" - to cause a baby to die in the very substance of life (a mother's milk) would be barbaric.

    Or something like that.
    Last edit by vashtee on Dec 3, '07

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