Shabbos/Religious Observances - page 7

As I begin the applications process for nursing schools, I have one huuuuge concern - my religious obligations. I am not permitted to work/attend school, etc. from sunset Friday nights until an hour... Read More

  1. by   Tweety
    Quote from tazzirn
    shhhhhhh!

    we're doin' good here, go 'way!
    nope. the mods are all over this one. yes, you're doing well.
  2. by   Agnus
    Thank you to the OP for your explanation. It has helped a great deal.
  3. by   texasmommy
    Quote from TazziRN
    As I said earlier, TM, I do not in any way think you are "wrong" for your beliefs or trying to stay within the restrictions of your belief. I just tried to point out another way of looking at it. As a Christian, if I have it way wrong, I apologize and will learn from this.

    If I were your nurse manager (when you're licensed! :spin I would have no problem with trying to help you observe the restrictions of your beliefs, but I just have a hard time understanding how any religious leader could see working on the Sabbath when there is no other feasible choice could be a sin and deny permission. I would never encourage you to go against your beliefs on the assumption that you would be forgiven later, unless there were an emergency.

    Again, I am NOT offended by your question.
    Glad to know that we are on good terms! :spin:
    If there were absolutely NO other nurses who could do what I was able to do, then of course, I would be allowed to work in order to save lives. But in our society, as I said before, there are plenty of qualified professionals (even though there is a nursing shortage) who could offer the same services and probably would not mind working on a Saturday.
    As a side note, in Judaism, our religious leaders do not make the rules, per se. Our rabbis interpret the laws and are able to make halachic (legal) decisions based on specific circumstances. Halacha (Jewish Law) itself is firmly based in the Torah.
  4. by   TazziRN
    texas, i have a question:

    i recently switched to home health, and we always have a nurse available 24/7. the only patients who get seen on weekends are the ones who need daily dressing changes or ivs or injections. how would an orthodox family handle that, if i needed to go to their home to care for a family member who was on iv meds? or, we often try to teach family to do some of the dressings or medicating, even the iv stuff. how does that fit with the work restrictions? i honestly want to know, just for my own information.
  5. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from earle58
    i had (and suppose, still do) considered Christianity a life of Godliness, minus the teachings in the Bible.
    So Christianity is a life of Godliness if you ignore the Bible?

    Now I'm totally confused!

    Oy!

    HELP!
  6. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from Suesquatch
    So Christianity is a life of Godliness if you ignore the Bible?

    Now I'm totally confused!

    Oy!

    HELP!
    i am not familiar with the teachings of the Bible.
    everything i have done in my life, has been based on my 1:1 relationship with God.
    yet most that are considered sins in the Bible, i have known already.
    this has worked tremendously with and for me.
    anything i have been taught, has been through thousands of personal conversations with Him, or through those who eminate and live under His hopes/will for us.

    leslie
  7. by   Tweety
    Quote from earle58
    so what i am asking, is if a nurse/doctor goes to work, to help the sick and suffering, wouldn't this type of ministry be acceptable to any one God?

    leslie
    Obviously it's perfectly acceptable to the God you believe in.

    Going to work might not be a "ministry" for someone whom might have other options, such as non-Jews working for them. Going to work as a nurse might not even be a ministry to the op. It certainly isn't for a lot of us.

    Some of the "laws" of religion baffle me sometimes. Like the "no meat on Friday rule" that my ex-mother-in-law, as a practicing Catholic follows faithfully. It's Long John Silver for fish ever Friday for dinner. That just seems so odd to me. I also grew up around people whose religion forbade them to play cards, to dance, and wear make up, cut their hair (females), etc.

    Sometimes I scracth my head as you are doing "surely God doesn't really care does he?
    Last edit by Tweety on Dec 2, '07
  8. by   lpnstudentin2010
    actually the no meat on friday thing got changed at vatican 2. now you can only not eat meat on friday during lent...to 40 days leading up to easter.


    Quote from Tweety
    Some of the "laws" of religion baffle me sometimes. Like the "no meat on Friday rule" that my ex-mother-in-law, as a practicing Catholic follows faithfully. It's Long John Silver for fish ever Friday for dinner. That just seems so odd to me. I also grew up around people whose religion forbade them to play cards, to dance, and wear make up, cut their hair (females), etc.

    Sometimes I scracth my head as you are doing "surely God doesn't really care does he?
    Last edit by Tweety on Dec 2, '07 : Reason: Quoting a post prior to the final edit.
  9. by   traumaRUs
    I appreciate everyone's candor with this subject. SOmetimes we can inadvertently put our feet in our mouths and hurt someone's feelings. I think we are all adults and realize that we have a lot of variety in the people that comprise our membership.

    It is important that we appreciate our diversity so that we can negotiate parameters for work/school that fit with our lifestyles and religious dictates.
  10. by   Tweety
    Quote from JustaPatient
    actually the no meat on friday thing got changed at vatican 2. now you can only not eat meat on friday during lent...to 40 days leading up to easter.
    Maybe it is during Lent that I've noticed, or maybe she keeps it up during the entire year. I wasn't very close to her so I can't say.

    Nonetheless it's still an odd practice....in my opinion.
  11. by   texasmommy
    Quote from Agnus
    Thank you to the OP for your explanation. It has helped a great deal.
    You're welcome!
  12. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from Tweety
    Going to work might not be a "ministry" for someone whom might have other options, such as non-Jews working for them.
    When my dad was a boy he used to earn a dime on Friday afternoons as a "shabbos goy" - he turned on the lights in the schul, or local temple. The money would be on a table so the beadle didn't have to touch it.
  13. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from JustaPatient
    actually the no meat on friday thing got changed at vatican 2. now you can only not eat meat on friday during lent...to 40 days leading up to easter.
    AND if I ended up going to Mass with a Catholic girlfriend I didn't have to wear a Kleenex on my head.

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