Sexism in Nursing (a male point of view) - page 10

As a male in nursing, I feel that I am sometimes treated differently because of my gender. I believe that I am expected to carry a heavier patient load with less assistance from my female coworkers.... Read More

  1. by   Dayray
    Okay here we go again with distorting the issue to defend a sexist attitude. Why not? This thread has been riddled with dispersions and distortions to avoid the real issue. The issue is sexism not lifting patients, not doctors vs nurses social standing and not patient's right to choose.

    I really could care less what she teaches her daughter. What does bother me is her use of her daughter to justify a sexist attitude and to elicit sympathy (meant for children) and redirect it at this issue and make others feel that her statements are just.

    And dear I am not ill, prejudice is an illness and I do not suffer from that while others do
  2. by   Q.
    Originally posted by Dayray
    I really could care less what she teaches her daughter. What does bother me is her use of her daughter to justify a sexist attitude and to elicit sympathy (meant for children) and redirect it at this issue and make others feel that her statements are just.

    Ok, Dayray, but what do you suppose we do? Force people to go with a certain provider just to prove a point?
  3. by   Big Rosie
    I consider myself to be an outspoken advocate for men in nursing. I work in OB and would love to see more men in L&D, postpartum and peds. As for the weight lifting issue, I'm the one in my department that fellow nurses come to for heavy lifting help. I'm a girl (big girl, 6' 250# lots of muscle) I'm not sure sexism is involved here, perhaps its the size of the bicept. However, I do believe that sexism is very real when it comes to men being accepted in L&D.
  4. by   Dayray
    Susy K
    I'm not even addressing that issue. Nurses always say "the patient chooses a female nurse" in these gender discussions. When in actuality this happens very ralely. I have seen it happen to other males but I suspect this is becuse they are generaly very timid as they have been made to feel sefl consouis by other nurses.

    So to answer your question I don't think we should force people to go to any provider. if they are more comfortable with a female nurse/doctor or a white nurse/doctor then that is their chose. I dont think that choice is made on valid criteria but I do stand by a patients rights.

    too answer Nurse4kids last post .. Im glad you are such an advocate for male nurses. in fact it reminds me of a civil rights activist in the 60's who said "I have no problems with them riding the bus I just don't want to sit by them" (can't remeber the name)
    I'm sure he felt he was on moral ground when he said that just like you do.

    =)

    thanks to Smiling and big rosie. While Im sure you don't agree with everything I say or the way I say it, I appriciate your comments thanks )
    Last edit by Dayray on Nov 20, '02
  5. by   nurs4kids
    Okay, dayray..
    plain and simple..

    1. Where is sexism in nursing? All I've read is about males being used for lifting. I didn't see another "sexist" example.

    2. How is my preference for a female caregiver for my daughter sexism?? If I have to be accused of being sexist to protect my daughter, then so be it. My hubby would laugh his butt off over this accusation. I am anything but sexist. I'm guessing you don't have a daughter. Just FYI, a three year old has a hard time understanding fine lines between right and wrong. It makes things alot easier to understand if you can give them clean cut directions. My child's father nor my father, both of whom I completely trust, do not bathe or go to the restroom with my daughter. If you never grey the area of appropriateness, then the child understands much easier. And as susy said, me nor society should be expected to raise their kids in a way they feel uncomfortable for the simple purpose of supporting nursing. I'm speaking as a parent and a patient. As a nurse, I'd rather you be able to cath your own patients so I won't be pulled from my patient to care for yours.
  6. by   LasVegasRN
    Originally posted by Susy K
    Ok, Dayray, but what do you suppose we do? Force people to go with a certain provider just to prove a point?
    Yes. He does. If a patient who has been raped says they prefer a female nurse, he's going to say that patient it being sexist. If a parent is being diligent about teaching their children how to be careful against predators in any type of environment, he's saying that parent is perpetuating sexism.

    It's interesting to me that one would work in an environment where this issue would come up continually and have such an enormous issue with perceived sexism.
  7. by   Dayray
    Hmm when did i say that Las vegas? by the way the patient I spent the most time with last week was a rape victom. I have a beutaful card she sent me thanking me for my care.

    Once again as i have stated hmm about 5 times now. this is not a patient issue. patients can go to whom they wish. this is a nursing issue and patient examples are used to provide support to sexisum.

    Nurse4kids please reread the subtitle of the thread its called Sexisum in nurseing ( al male prospective) not who lifts patients or where to take your kids for health care.

    By the way I have removed the personal attacks from my previous posts you were right that was'nt cool and I apoligize
  8. by   LasVegasRN
    You've said it before in similar threads, Dayray. It's as if you want so badly to FORCE patient's to do what YOU want or to fuel your personal agenda that you don't see that we are all consumers of healthcare that have a choice also. This doesn't make us sexist!!
  9. by   Q.
    Originally posted by Dayray
    Nurse4kids please reread the subtitle of the thread its called Sexisum in nurseing ( al male prospective) not who lifts patients or where to take your kids for health care.
    But really, that's the only issue that seemed to have been used in this thread to support the prevalence of sexism in nursing! That appears to have been the only example, other than general vauge statements of attitudes that it "exists" without question.

    Like I said, I don't practice sexism in my work. I ask for help from the best nurse for the job, whether it's male or female.
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    In my mind anyhow, You learn to deal cause the MOST QUALIFIED PERSON may not be of the GENDER of your CHOICE one day....in a life or death situation it may not matter, eh? So why does it now? Wherever my kids or myself have been examined, there has been a same-sex chaperone (or myself) in the room.......I think that is appropriate and about COVERS any fears/perceptions I may have with opposite-sex issues in medicine and nursing. To put a little twist on it, I don't want to believe that even nurses or dr's of the SAME sex might, just MIGHT be capable of abuse themselves.....hey perhaps, chaparoning is a good deal all the way around when there is any doubt. I have to agree with SUZY here...I want the MOST QUALIFIED PERSON ON THE CASE, GENDER is not a major consideration in that light. JMO.....only mine.....
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Nov 20, '02
  11. by   Dayray
    Oh and by the way I have 3 daughters, 4 sisters, a wife a mother and I think our hamster is female too. Oh and by the way my last degree was in sociology with a minor in women's studies. I have a very high respect for women and work with women who are vicotms of abuse everyday. I don't see how good touch bad touch has anythign to do with the gender of your care provider as females (although statistily less likely to do so) do in fact molest childeren (statistcly girl victoms more so then boys)
  12. by   Dayray
    Las vegas I have never said any such thing. i challange you to reread those posts and find one spot that sugested we make people go to male nurses or doctors.

    In previous discussions my words were twisted in that way. But I have never said any such thing.

    for the hmm lets see 6th time this is not a patient issue it is a nurseing issue.
  13. by   nurs4kids
    Originally posted by chigap
    As a male in nursing, I feel that I am sometimes treated differently because of my gender. I believe that I am expected to carry a heavier patient load with less assistance from my female coworkers. I also believe that men are more often assigned to care for obese patients; I am also sometimes pulled to the other end of the unit to assist in moving heavy patients because I am stronger.

    For instance, I work in an ICU and our nurse to patient ratio is either 1:1 or 1:2; the other day 4 out of the 5 doubles (1:2) were assigned to men. On the same day, a female nurse said "We can get so and so to help, he's a big strong guy." I responded that I felt that was sexism and the nurse said "Are you saying that men aren't physically stronger than women." I replied that I agreed that, in general, men are stronger than women; however, they are not immune to back injuries or repeatative stress injuries. We are friends and this was a friendly and playful discussion.

    This is the lead off post in the thread. It's about being asked to assist in lifting, nothing more.

    I am still asking for more examples of where there is sexism in nursing. Pointing me to the title of the thread is not giving me factual..or even subjective info. WHAT in nursing is sexist???

close