Senior administration working a shift/month - page 2

I heard about his from a friend in Tulsa. Their senior administrative staff works one shift a month (shift of their choice, usually a weekend) as unlicensed staff. Pass trays, assist with baths,... Read More

  1. by   Tweety
    I would like to see that when it's tough, staffing is short that they roll up their sleeves and help us out. I with you there John, the best managers get in the trenches.

    I'd open my mind to the idea of having them work once a month, if it improves morale. But I also would be wary for the reasons already stated. They are administrators, they have their job, perhaps some of them have done their time in the trenches and don't want to go back. Basically what I'm saying is I have no opinion. LOL
    Last edit by Tweety on Jun 8, '04
  2. by   missmercy
    [...the bosses that I worked the hardest for were the ones that would roll up their sleeves and wade in right beside you.[/QUOTE]

    I agree -- the bosses that I have had who would roll up their sleeves and help: did so consistantly when they were able to... managers who were willing to come out and answer call lights, sit in a room with a onene, feed a confused person .. They were available for advice and support even when they could not come out on the floor -- and you knew that they were sincere -- because they were trying to make a difference from their desk too -- they understood nursing and nursing needs and did whatever they could to address those needs either fiscally or personally -- without ever really leaving the manager role -- they didn't work a "token shift" but were available as they could be to help us when we were swamped!
  3. by   RN4NICU
    A friend of mine worked at a facility where this was done. Only there was a hidden adgenda. The administration was measuring/monitoring downtime to use as an excuse to decrease staffing. You really have to watch the bean counters. They think if you are sitting down to chart or if GOD FORBID you have 2 seconds to sit down and take a sip of water, that you are not busy and that precious pennies (that could be going in THEIR pockets) are being wasted. Not to say that the intentions of some are not good. I'm sure some administrators really do mean well.
  4. by   Maggiemay
    We have a program where the Directors and Managers do walking rounds on one "off shift" a month. It is assigned so that there is someone there at all times. THis includes Nurses, Facilities, X-ray, and everyone else.

    It was nice to have the AOD (Administrator on Duty) available to handle the weird stuff. (IE running to the store for Molasses for a M&M enema, dealing with odd visitors, etc.)

    Morale went up, and staff loved it.


    Quote from 2rntish
    I heard about his from a friend in Tulsa. Their senior administrative staff works one shift a month (shift of their choice, usually a weekend) as unlicensed staff. Pass trays, assist with baths, transport pts...He said it helped with morale more than any thing he has seen in years. The nursing staff now know that the administative types know what it is like (to a degree) to try to take care of 7 patients AND their family AND call lights, AND meds not available, AND no equipment, AND 5 admits...
    Anyone else work where this is done??? I have suggested it and probably be looking for employment before long. Still think it is a GREAT idea.
  5. by   2rntish
    Quote from Maggiemay
    We have a program where the Directors and Managers do walking rounds on one "off shift" a month. It is assigned so that there is someone there at all times. THis includes Nurses, Facilities, X-ray, and everyone else.

    It was nice to have the AOD (Administrator on Duty) available to handle the weird stuff. (IE running to the store for Molasses for a M&M enema, dealing with odd visitors, etc.)

    Morale went up, and staff loved it.
    M&M enema, got to love it and it would be great to have an AOD to help. Our AOD is available by phone from the country club.
    Our administrators started "walking rounds" about a year ago. It never failed...they would show up after the car load of hemophiliacs had hit a glass truck, M&M enemas for all pts, 2 codes, and a couple of EODs. Everyone so exhausted they can't move. Sr VP would walk thru, mumble something about "it must be nice" and keep going.
    I think, with few exceptions, any exposure is nice but they need exposure on a regular basis for 8+ hours at a time to get a better feel.
  6. by   Spidey's mom
    Our DON's office is about 7 steps from the last patient room. She can hear our conversation from the nurse's station to her office. It is a small office, not lovely at all and without great access to heat from the hallway and right next to the outside door so she keeps a small heater in there in winter to keep her feet warm as that door opens and closes all day long and a fan in the summer to cool off. Her door is always open, except for confidential conversation with staff and there is a window over her desk where we can see in and she can see out. Yesterday she helped move a bed that was broken out of a room we needed badly for an admit from ER at shift change. She sits at the nurse's station when the ward clerk is at lunch and all the nursing staff is busy with patients and answers the phone. She takes a lunch tray to a patient when we are swamped. She has covered the ER nurse when there is an emergency and that nurse is needed elsewhere.

    The fact is there are lazy nurses and great nurses, bad bosses and great bosses. My boss worked as a nurse for years and doesn't need to be out on the floor to remember how hard it was. It just bugs me when we blast all administrators as blood-sucking ingrates who forgot from whence they came.

    When I first started working there was one nurse who would write "I hate bedside nursing" on the deskpad . . and then go out on the floor and prove it. I didn't judge all nurses by him . .but he was certainly a bad nurse and finally quit.

    You have to be part of the solution . . . or else don't whine.

    steph
  7. by   Maggiemay
    I agree, Nurses whine, (I too have been guilty)..
    Not all "bosses" are bad, as a matter of fact I think I have had more of the good ones.

    It is sad that there is such a limited level of trust these days..
    Oh Well,
    THANK YOU ALL FOR TAKING CARE OF MY PEOPLE!!!!!!!!!!
  8. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from Maggiemay
    I agree, Nurses whine, (I too have been guilty)..
    Not all "bosses" are bad, as a matter of fact I think I have had more of the good ones.

    It is sad that there is such a limited level of trust these days..
    Oh Well,
    THANK YOU ALL FOR TAKING CARE OF MY PEOPLE!!!!!!!!!!
    EVERYBODY whines - it's the nature of the species.

    I've heard business people (who earn well over 6 figures) whine because their work goes unnoticed or because they don't get enough family time. I've heard people with yachts whine because the price of fuel is so high they can't go cruising around as often as they did last summer without having to "sacrifice" other niceties. I've heard celebrities whine because the paparazzi follows them around all the time. Everybody whines - nurses are special for other reasons, but not this one.
  9. by   caroladybelle
    The good places that I have worked for, did this or something similar.

    The bad places, NO WAY!!!!

    (The few hospitals that I have worked for that are listed in the top 35 in the Nation by US News and World Report, their UMs worked the floor ocasionally. My favorite was an inner city unit, whose UM - over 60 beds managed- worked a 3-11 weekend shift as regular staff every 4-6 weeks. She carried the same 5-8 patient load as anyone.)
  10. by   NRSKarenRN
    Agree with RNPATL
    I want administrators to know what the conditions on the floor are like. I want them to experience first hand the challenges and struggles that the nursing staff have to endure, even if it is a token shift and once in a blue moon
    The CEO of Mercy Health System has gone out on homecare visits with nurses and PT's in suburbs and city areas. Resident physicians will be accompanying RN's on visits this fall along with med students. Dietary administrator made home visits too. CEO of my homecare agency took Intake Referrals for several hours one snowy day and UNDERSTANDS my department.

    They now know what it takes to provide " excellent customer service"
    and have gotten me the tools to work with: new computers!
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Jun 8, '04
  11. by   mscsrjhm
    Richard Feynman, Scientist, Nobel Prize Winner, etc, etc..
    In his book regarding the Challenger Disaster, while specifying the O-Ring debacle, included that the distance between the 'administration' and the 'workers' (including those producing the O-Ring) was of major importance in the explosion.
    The administration just didn't pay attention when their subordinates reported that the O-Ring could be defective in certain conditions.
    In short, they didn't see for their own eyes, and didn't listen.
    Is there any negative thing that could occur by administration spending 12 days out of the year "on the floor?

    Mschrisco
  12. by   RNPATL
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    Agree with RNPATL

    The CEO of Mercy Health System has gone out on homecare visits with nurses and PT's in suburbs and city areas. Resident physicians will be accompanying RN's on visits this fall along with med students. Dietary administrator made home visits too. CEO of my homecare agency took Intake Referrals for several hours one snowy day and UNDERSTANDS my department.

    They now know what it takes to provide " excellent customer service"
    and have gotten me the tools to work with: new computers!
    Karen - I think your situation is wonderful. Unfortunately, your situation is more the exception than the rule. In all my years in nursing, I have only had 1 CNO take the time to get involved with the operation of our floor. She was a wonderful CNO and really worked to get the nurses what they needed to do the job.

    I really believe that if senior management took a moment out of their day to recognize that it is a real disaster on the floors today, they might stop and think about what they are doing. Maybe not, but I would hope so. Your situation illustrates that when senior management works side by side with nursing, things can get accomplished.
  13. by   Betty_SPN_KS
    This reminds me of a nursing home administrator who could sometimes be found mopping floors, pushing wheelchairs, working in the dish room. This guy had so much energy, the DON called him "a fart in a frying pan" LOL.

    I think an administrator-in-training had to take CNA training.

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