Sending nurses over from India???

  1. A nursing friend of mine just informed me that there is talk of training nurses in India and then offering them free housing to come work in the U.S. Is this true :angryfire :uhoh21: ? I was going to start nursing school next year, but may rethink it now. I work from home as a medical transcriptionist. I don't have any benefits, but my husband does. I can make $23.00+ an hour if I'm cranking out over 300 lines in an hour (which I do). This is before taxes, which means I foot the bill 100% for Medicare. But, I don't have to drive anywhere nor do I have to pay for a babysitter. I can be home when my son wakes up, take him to school, work at home, pick him back up after school. BUt this requires quite a bit of weekend work. I can also work as a substitute teacher for $80.00 once he is in school full time and this won't require any extra school as I have an associates in science. I miss being around people, but I can achieve that by volunteering again with Hospice or our local nursing home (which is where I wanted to do nursing LTC). Do you all think the money I make now is comparable to that of a LTC nurse in a small town? Just looking for some good advice/info from nurses out there in the field/trenches. Thanks a bunch!!
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  2. 29 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    I wouldn't worry about it. Nurses are trained all over the world. The only way that a foreign nurse can legaly work in the US is with a green card, and that means that their English skills are as good as native speaker.

    Nurses from India have problems with the TSE part of the exam as well as TWE. This is well documented and not just my opinion. Even though English is spoken in many areas there, most of the nurses use their native dialect at work, just like they do in the Philippines.

    There are going to be jobs out there for nurses for a long time to come, so if nursing is something that you want to do, then just go for it. Nurses have been coming to the US form the Philippines for many years and we still need more nurses. I wouldn't worry about it.

    Enjoy your studies..................
  4. by   need2be
    Hello, This is my first post. I was wondering how did you get involved with the med. trans.? What type of training do you have? It sounds like a good job to do while in school. Thanks for any info.
  5. by   Rep
    [QUOTE=linfull]A nursing friend of mine just informed me that there is talk of training nurses in India and then offering them free housing to come work in the U.S. Is this true :angryfire :uhoh21: ? I was going to start nursing school next year, but may rethink it now. I work from home as a medical transcriptionist. I don't have any benefits, but my husband does. I can make $23.00+ an hour if I'm cranking out over 300 lines in an hour (which I do). This is before taxes, which means I foot the bill 100% for Medicare. But, I don't have to drive anywhere nor do I have to pay for a babysitter. I can be home when my son wakes up, take him to school, work at home, pick him back up after school. BUt this requires quite a bit of weekend work. I can also work as a substitute teacher for $80.00 once he is in school full time and this won't require any extra school as I have an associates in science. I miss being around people, but I can achieve that by volunteering again with Hospice or our local nursing home (which is where I wanted to do nursing LTC). Do you all think the money I make now is comparable to that of a LTC nurse in a small town? Just looking for some good advice/info from nurses out there in the field/trenches. Thanks a bunch!![/QUOTE

    I think your friend has wrong info on the matter of training nurses and bringing them to the US to work plus benefits as free housing. All you have to look at is when there is a shortage of nursing in the states, more peole from other countries started taking up nursing. Here in the Philippines, to become a nurse, you have to enter a four year college course to earn a BSN. No such thing as LPN or ADN programs. We spent our own money to get to nursing schools, no such thing as tuition reimbursement when you get hired by a hospital as common in the States. No help from our other foreign goverments who are facing a nursing crisis. Aside from our nursing board exams, we have to take three other exams ( CGFNS, TSE, TOEFL ) required by the US regulating agencies before we could get a visa for the states.

    So, no need to worry. Foreign nurses are not competing against you in the nursing job market. I hope this info helps. Good luck to your plan to become a nurse.
  6. by   Tweety
    I don't think the US is doing the training either. But there are agencies that are doing recruiting in India and bringing them over the same way they do in the Phillipines. We've had a few that were considered by our hospital.
  7. by   linfull
    Thanks so much for all of the info. I just became a little nervous when thinking of taking out another student loan after getting my last one paid off and discovering that I would not be able to find a job! Thanks again!
  8. by   linfull
    Quote from need2be
    Hello, This is my first post. I was wondering how did you get involved with the med. trans.? What type of training do you have? It sounds like a good job to do while in school. Thanks for any info.
    I received my associates in science back in 1996. I took A&PI & II, pathophysiology, pharmacology and lots of other classes that have disappeared over the past 8 years from my mind! I remember lots of medical assitant students in the classes with me and they couldn't believe how much I had to take to perform transcription. Well, now I see that my college has decided to make medical transcription a certificate! No path, no pharm, no A&P II. Just medical term. and lots of typing. I am lucky to have worked with a local legal deposition company that had one doctor that had a back log of dictation. Since then, we have spun off into our own company and cover our entire state, plus are going to other states. It would be a great job while in school. You just have to have the reports turned around within 24 hours and make sure they are 99.5% accurate. Hope this info was helpful!
  9. by   oramar
    Is that these reports will be outsourced to India. There is a lot of that going on these days.
    Quote from linfull
    I received my associates in science back in 1996. I took A&PI & II, pathophysiology, pharmacology and lots of other classes that have disappeared over the past 8 years from my mind! I remember lots of medical assitant students in the classes with me and they couldn't believe how much I had to take to perform transcription. Well, now I see that my college has decided to make medical transcription a certificate! No path, no pharm, no A&P II. Just medical term. and lots of typing. I am lucky to have worked with a local legal deposition company that had one doctor that had a back log of dictation. Since then, we have spun off into our own company and cover our entire state, plus are going to other states. It would be a great job while in school. You just have to have the reports turned around within 24 hours and make sure they are 99.5% accurate. Hope this info was helpful!
  10. by   Sheri257
    I don't view foreign nurses as a threat. Here's why:

    You can't outsource a nursing job to India. You have to bring the foreign nurse here. Therefore, they have to live here, and they have the same cost of living as we do. It's not quite the same thing as those IT jobs moving to India. Even if they're not paid well initially, foreign nurses do eventually demand the same wages, benefits, etc. There have been EEOC cases where foreign nurses have sued and successfully fought for better wages and benefits.

    There have been posts on this board where administrators have complained about training foreign nurses who eventually left for better paying jobs elsewhere. The reason is that demand for nurses is high and should continue to grow with the aging baby boom generation. So, hopefully, there should be room for everybody.

    Also, there are new English proficiency requirements will hopefully eliminate the problem of foreign nurses who don't speak the language well. This might also reduce any potential flood of foreign nurses coming into the marketplace.

    :spin:
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 24, '04
  11. by   angel337
    i have read several articles over the years about plans the U.S. are taking to relieve the nursing "shortage". statistically according to most U.S. nurses, nursing is the worst career you could have so why all the fuss when there is talk about replacing us with foreign nurses? i don't think that india nurses will be replacing us any time soon, but is is something to think about. i love nursing, i have had other careers and so far nursing has provided the best pay and the most security. is the job crappy at times? of course. but in order for us to keep that security, nurses have to be advocates for their profession instead of bashing it. i think you should pursue your nursing career. the more people that go into nursing the better it will be for this country.
  12. by   suzanne4
    Depending on which state that the foreign nurse is going to work in, it can take up to 18 months to get everything processed. Right now, about the quickest is 9 months to 1 year for the nurse that properly completes her/his paperwork in the right sequence, etc. Any nurse now coming into the US to work is coming on a green card as a permanent resident so there are no differences in salaries, unless they get the "Royal Screw" by an unscrupulous agency, who pockets most of the money and not the nurse.

    You cannot get a green card without having English skills the same as a native speaker so that severly limits the amount of foreign nurses who will be coming over to the US. I wouldn't worry about them taking a job from you.
    There are more than enough to go around.....................

    There are actually some unscrupulous people over here promising the nurse that they can go to the US with only a CGFNS exam and no English requirements and work as an RN. Pay is about $16 BLENDED rate as they call it for California, meaning that the nurse works 12 hour shifts and essentially gets about $12 per hour. Or I have heard Chicago at $24. But you can't work in the US without a Visa Screen, which requires complete English series.
    People that don't know any better will jump at any chance to get to the US and unfortunately they are taken advantage of. But if you are willing to sign a work contract for three years in English, when you don't understand it, you should get what is coming to you. And both of the "unscrupulous' people doing it here are nurses......................just beyond me................but as they say "What goes around, comes around."
  13. by   Tweety
    Also note in order to hire a foreign citazen of any sort it must be proven that it is a job no US citazen wants or can fill. (Think migrant worker picking fruit for low wages in the hot sun.) So if US nurses are filling the positions, hospitals are not allowed to bring over foreign workers.

    It's a double edged sword. They are BSN prepared and are excellent nurses. It fulfills a dire need. On the other hand it allows the profression and management not to address the issues as to why there is a shortage in the first place.
  14. by   jgs284
    You wrote "Also note in order to hire a foreign citazen of any sort it must be proven that it is a job no US citazen wants or can fill. (Think migrant worker picking fruit for low wages in the hot sun.) So if US nurses are filling the positions, hospitals are not allowed to bring over foreign workers."

    Take it from me, that is no assurance. I AM one of those out-of-work tech workers, now pursuing a nursing degree. This post made my blood run cold, because I do believe this can happen. Those Indian workers who provide tech support speak beautiful English, with only a slight accent. I can also see hospitals using this to drive pay DOWN. Supply and demand. What kills me is the wait lists to get into Nursing school here in COlorado is YEARS -- there are thousands of smart, qualified people waiting to get into clinicals. Would the state or federal government address the nursing shortage by fixing this bottleneck? No. That makes too much sense! But based on my own hard experience I can absolutely see them importing foreign, low paid nurses under some emergency exception to the visa laws. This is a train wreck waiting to happen.
    :uhoh21:

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