Second Degree Accelerated or 5 semester BSN- Help me decide

  1. I attended an interview yesterday at a school where I applied for the accelerated nursing program. I left the interview wondering if I should switch to the 5 semester program. Well, the interviewers did a great jod trying to convince me that the 5 semester would be more enriching for me and would provide greater opportunities for me both during and after school.

    They said that because of my background... masters degree in education, and a doctor of jurisprudence, the opportunities in research, and the different Centers that the school has will be better experienced over the 5 semester period. Interactions with the staff and faculty also is at a deeper level.

    The accelerated program lasts for 12 months. Most of the coursework is done online. Students meet one day a week for a seminar class and 2 days a week for clinicals.

    I have taken online classes before, and after a while, I got tired of the impersonal nature of it. I would love the classroom interaction with the students and the instructors, I think. However, 12 months will be here and gone in no time and I can go back to homeschooling my children after that one year. My children will be 8 and 6 when the program begins.

    Does anyone have an opinion?
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   orrnlori
    Yes, I do. If you want to be a nurse, then go the the 5 semester program. While I don't mean to discount your current educational background, it has nothing to do with nursing therefore, you should look to the campus to teach you about nurses and nursing.

    If it were reversed, and you were already a practicing nurse looking to obtain a higher degree, I would recommend the reverse.

    I am a practicing ADN, am completing a BS (psychology) by distance learning and then intend to parlay that into an MSN. I have done a lot of research on higher nursing education, a lot. I personally have strong doubts about distance learning nursing with little contact with real nurses and nursing practice when the learner is not a nurse to begin with. Again, this is just my humble opinion. I want to teach nursing someday so I have strong opinions about this. Only you know your aptitude.

    If your goal is only nursing theory and not practice then it doesn't matter. I personally think we need more real nurses and less theorists. Theorists and researchers loose track of the purpose of the real nurse. Again, strong opinions on the subject.

    And the issue of home schooling your children will obviously determine your decision. I think some public schooling is good for the societal development of children in general. Others will strongly disagree with that.
  4. by   lady_jezebel
    I agree. I'm a new RN. Very glad that I chose to do the 2-year accelerated BSN rather than the 1-year BSN. More clinical time the better. Really, you need that time to experience different pt populations first hand & and to learn skills. It is your only chance to ask questions & take time to explore/learn new things. Don't short-change yourself! Once you are a new RN, you'll realize that there is no increased prestige in graduating from a 1-year accelerated program. No one cares. However, you may make your first year difficult for yourself, for you'll have a lot of catching up to do. The ADNs will be much more competent RNs the first year.
  5. by   LeesieBug
    It is your only chance to ask questions & take time to explore/learn new things. Don't short-change yourself!
    I don't personally have experience with the accelerated BSN (I'm in a standard BSN program), but I have friends doing the accelerated that agree with this point. Many of them feel like they are just RACING through the material, just skimming the surface because they do not have time to explore topics in depth. One of my friends dropped the accelerated due to the demanding schedule and the fact that she felt she wasn't getting out of it what she should be. Our accelerated studensts are in class/clinical a total of forty hours a week...add on study time to that and....whew! Tires me out just thinking about it.

    In the end, some do well and feel happy with it, and some don't. It might be good to find out if the school would allow you to switch to the standard program if the accelerated is not working for you. At least then you have an option if it turns out to be too much.

    Ultimately I think it depends on your personality, your personal situation(working? kids? do you have the time required to put into an accelearted schedule?), and what you would like to get out of the program.

    Good luck!!
  6. by   New Castle Ken
    This sounds great and it sounds like you will still be with a regular class for 1 day a week plus 2 days clinical. Since you see the other students in person; the online portion should have new meaning.There are more nurses now with JDs which is a good thing as it brings more perspective to health care issues. Good luck.



    Quote from careerdejour
    I attended an interview yesterday at a school where I applied for the accelerated nursing program. I left the interview wondering if I should switch to the 5 semester program. Well, the interviewers did a great jod trying to convince me that the 5 semester would be more enriching for me and would provide greater opportunities for me both during and after school.

    They said that because of my background... masters degree in education, and a doctor of jurisprudence, the opportunities in research, and the different Centers that the school has will be better experienced over the 5 semester period. Interactions with the staff and faculty also is at a deeper level.

    The accelerated program lasts for 12 months. Most of the coursework is done online. Students meet one day a week for a seminar class and 2 days a week for clinicals.

    I have taken online classes before, and after a while, I got tired of the impersonal nature of it. I would love the classroom interaction with the students and the instructors, I think. However, 12 months will be here and gone in no time and I can go back to homeschooling my children after that one year. My children will be 8 and 6 when the program begins.

    Does anyone have an opinion?
  7. by   blueginger
    I think you should stay with whatever you feel more comfortable. Rightnow I am in the process searching for accelerated BSN programs. May I know where your interview is? Thank you very much.
    Quote from New Castle Ken
    This sounds great and it sounds like you will still be with a regular class for 1 day a week plus 2 days clinical. Since you see the other students in person; the online portion should have new meaning.There are more nurses now with JDs which is a good thing as it brings more perspective to health care issues. Good luck.
  8. by   fulwood
    If I were you I would go for an accelerated BSN. It will be more expensive but you will be out in the workforce 18 months earlier than in the regular BSN program. Many people nowadays take accelerated BSN programs and are wonderful nurses. I would suggest if you take the accelerated BSN route that upon graduation you accept job that has a long orientation/preceptorship. Accelerated programs are good programs and many fpeople don't seem to understand that yes you have a degree already but all the programs require prior to entry that you still need miro, chem, human anat and physiology. It's not like you just enter BSN accelerated program without having these. But ultimately do what is best for you. I think with your years in college as evidence by your degrees that you will have no problems doing an accelerated program. Do ultimately what your gut instinct tells you to do. Whichever way you go you will still be an RN! Good luck. I intend to do the acclerated BSN..
  9. by   careerdejour
    Quote from fulwood
    If I were you I would go for an accelerated BSN. It will be more expensive but you will be out in the workforce 18 months earlier than in the regular BSN program. Many people nowadays take accelerated BSN programs and are wonderful nurses. I would suggest if you take the accelerated BSN route that upon graduation you accept job that has a long orientation/preceptorship. Accelerated programs are good programs and many fpeople don't seem to understand that yes you have a degree already but all the programs require prior to entry that you still need miro, chem, human anat and physiology. It's not like you just enter BSN accelerated program without having these. But ultimately do what is best for you. I think with your years in college as evidence by your degrees that you will have no problems doing an accelerated program. Do ultimately what your gut instinct tells you to do. Whichever way you go you will still be an RN! Good luck. I intend to do the acclerated BSN..
    Thanks everyone for your kind comments. I have been shortlisted for another accelrated program that is 13.5 months instead of 12. It also has a full time classroom component. Which means that I will be in class for the theory with other students, as well as during the clinicals.
    I am now weighing the options all together.
    I didn't think it was going to be this tough.
    Both schools are state schools, so there is little difference in the cost.
    The schools are in the Houston area.
  10. by   EmeraldNYL
    I recently completed a one year accelerated BSN, but it was all classroom. I don't think I would have gotten nearly as good of an experience if most of my classes were taught online. Are there any other accelerated BSN programs in your area that offer more of a classroom experience?
  11. by   msummar_smc
    If you don't mind me asking ... why haven't any of the other careers stuck? Master of Education and JD degree ... why not be an attorney? It seems like you like school and not necessarily work. Why don't you try to get a job teaching at the local university instead of nursing? You can do that easily with your credentials. Just my 2 cents.
  12. by   careerdejour
    Quote from msummar_smc
    If you don't mind me asking ... why haven't any of the other careers stuck? Master of Education and JD degree ... why not be an attorney? It seems like you like school and not necessarily work. Why don't you try to get a job teaching at the local university instead of nursing? You can do that easily with your credentials. Just my 2 cents.
    Thanks for your 2 cents.

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