School's Voluntary Withdrawal From NLN?

  1. There are a number of Florida public colleges granting the BSN scheduled for "Voluntary Withdrawal in June 2004" on the NLN Accreditation schedule. The definition states that the schools have voluntarily removed themselves from association with the NLNAC. What does this mean for the students?
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  2. 21 Comments

  3. by   KristinWW
    I'm looking further across the country and it appears ALL the very large public universities are voluntarily withdrawaling. Why is this? Is there another large nursing body that oversees schools? Is there no need for nursing agency affiliation as the large schools are already accredited as an institution of higher learning?
  4. by   KristinWW
    Last post - the school is not accredited by the CCNE either - help!
  5. by   TopCat1234
    i have no idea what it means, but it is interesting nonetheless. perhaps you can contact the school or the nlnac and ask what it means?

    topcat
  6. by   Berta
    I'm not 100% sure, but I think that means you can't sit for the NCLEX. Our school just had the NLN there a couple of months ago. We were told if they didn't accredit our school, we couldn't take the NCLEX exam. Perhaps this varies from state to state????
  7. by   KristinWW
    Quote from Berta
    I'm not 100% sure, but I think that means you can't sit for the NCLEX. Our school just had the NLN there a couple of months ago. We were told if they didn't accredit our school, we couldn't take the NCLEX exam. Perhaps this varies from state to state????
    Good thought but I don't think that could be correct because these are very large universities withdrawaling.
  8. by   Sheri257
    I really don't understand what NLN accreditation means. The online Excelsior College program is NLN accredited, but that didn't stop California from disallowing the program.

    Here, the BORN is the primary regulator of nursing programs. You're either approved by the BORN or not. That's all that matters to sit for the NCLEX.

    If it's the same elsewhere, maybe this is why other universities are withdrawing?

    Last edit by Sheri257 on May 21, '04
  9. by   KristinWW
    It depends on the state - some states require multiple accreditation, some do not. I spoke to the National Board. That explains the huge dropout of the big universities. I feel better!
  10. by   GracefulRN
    but I think there is a trend were most schools are withdrawing from being accredited by the NLN and switching to CCNE accredidation, but if your school has neither I would talk to someone at your school and find out what is going on.
  11. by   KristinWW
    Quote from GracefulRN
    but I think there is a trend were most schools are withdrawing from being accredited by the NLN and switching to CCNE accredidation, but if your school has neither I would talk to someone at your school and find out what is going on.
    Graceful, this is correct and I was told the better schools are CCNE. However, as long as we can still take NCLEX I guess we're okay, though it does not look good if I intend to move out of state when a potential employer checks my school and sees no accreditation.
  12. by   Dplear
    A potential employer is not going to gives a damn whether your school was NLN or CCNE accresited. All they will want to know is did you graduate and did you pass the boards. In over 16 years ofnursing has anyone even cared what accreditatrions my school had. All they have ever asked isname and date of graduation.

    Dave
  13. by   hobbes
    My school as well voluntarily withdrew from NLN accredidation and opted for CCNE. At first I was rather skeptical but it seems like other respected BSN programs are accredited by CCNE or are opting for this accrediting agency once their current accreditation expires. If I were you I would just verify that your school is indeed accredited and that you will have no problem sitting for boards when the time comes.
  14. by   RNPATL
    Accreditation is a very important aspect for anyone seeking a professional nursing degree. This is especially true for you if you plan to advance your education. Most universities will not accept credit earned by a nursing program that is not accredited. Please make sure that your program is accredited.

    In relationship to employers .... every single RN job description with my employer requires that the RN be licensed in the state of practice and have a nursing degree granted by an accredited college or university. Accreditation is very important and please make sure you know the facts before you lay down all that tuition cash for your nursing degree.

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