School Pins

  1. I have been working as an LPN for almost 6 years. I just graduated from an ADN program. I intend to keep my LPN license active. Does anyone know if I am supposed to retire my LPN school pin or do I wear both school pins?
    Connie
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   P_RN
    I'd wear them both WITH PRIDE. You earned them.
  4. by   fedupnurse
    I'd wear both pins but I wouldn't maintain the LPN license. Legally you will be held to whatever your "higher" licensure, educational level and national certs you may have. For example, I am an RN BSN CCRN. I would be held to a higher standard than someone I work with who has RN and not other credentials. It is stupid because all it means is you did busy work for a BSN (never used mine yet as a bedside nurse) or were good at taking a test. Why give the state more money than you need to? Congratulations on getting your RN!
  5. by   catlady
    What are the higher standards for a BSN vs. the rest of us? And I have my CCRN as well, but if I work in critical care, I am not held to a higher standard than a nurse without CCRN, but to the same standard of a reasonably prudent critical care nurse. Certification does not come with added legal responsibility, or many people would rethink their certifications.
  6. by   MPHkatie
    I think, and correct me if I am wrong- that the other poster was saying, that she doesn't think the OP (original poster) should maintain both a LPN liscence and a RN liscence, as the Person will be held to her higher (RN) Liscence.

    but after re-reading that post, I agree with catlady, there is no seperate standard for someone with a BSN or CCRN of CEN or what not. They are nice certs, but they are not some sort of legally binding thing.

    and I guess I'll add my two cents, A BSN is never stupid. It is a bachelors degree, it doesn't make you a better nurse or a good nurse, or whatnot, but it isn't stupid, no education is ever a waste of time or "stupid".
  7. by   skwirm
    I agree. A BSN certainly does not mean you are a better or worse nurse. It is simply a different level of education that may be applicable to certain areas of the nursing field. I know that in my "health region" if you want to be a public health nurse, a minimum of a BSN is mandatory. I guess it all depends on what aspect of nursing (they are all equally important) you want to or plan on working in. Just my 3 cents worth
  8. by   fedupnurse
    Well, I guess I was either misinformed or the rules in NJ are different. You allegedly have "more knowledge" with higher degrees and national certs. I have been to several legal seminars near where I live and they have all said you are held to the level of your licnese and education. That's why I said it was stupid, not the education part-always helps to have those initials after your name on a resume and to have whatever knowledge you can under your cap. It would be a stupid legal standard since the BSN I have hasn't contributed one ioda to my nursing practice. It would contribute to my practice if I were a manager, but as a staff nurse, my CCRN did more for me than my BSN. Some people, myself included, are actually rethinking the CCRN certification since clinical experience is no longer a requirement. It doesn't have the same prestige as it did when you knew someone with CCRN after their name actually did patient care on a somewhat regular basis. It also costs a pretty penny to maintain.
    Ah, yes, another reason to leave the most regulated state in the good ole USA, New Jersey. If we had as many nurses as lawyers we'd be in mighty fine shape! Glad to hear it is different elsewhere.
  9. by   catlady
    Originally posted by fedupnurse
    Well, I guess I was either misinformed or the rules in NJ are different. You allegedly have "more knowledge" with higher degrees and national certs. I have been to several legal seminars near where I live and they have all said you are held to the level of your licnese and education. ...Some people, myself included, are actually rethinking the CCRN certification since clinical experience is no longer a requirement. It doesn't have the same prestige as it did when you knew someone with CCRN after their name actually did patient care on a somewhat regular basis.
    You may have higher degrees and national certs, with or without more knowledge, but when you perform a particular job, you are held to the standard of a reasonably prudent nurse who normally performs that job. That's why, by the same logic, even if you're *underqualified*, such as when you float to an unfamiliar area, you are still held to that standard and you should refuse the assignment. Your licensure does affect the standard; an APRN is held to a different standard than an RN, who must meet a different standard from an LPN; these are of course determined in no small measure by the level of education. The particular standards are affected both by state regulations, and by commonly accepted nursing practice for the discipline, the setting, the region, and the country.

    Maintaining active CCRN credentials still necessitates bedside nursing hours, although they've considerably relaxed the requirements. From the website: "Whether or not you are eligible to renew your CCRN is something you would need to determine based on your own practice. If your nursing position finds you working with critically ill patients for at least 144 hours per year (this equates to 12 hours per month), you could meet the clinical practice requirement and be eligible to renew. If your current practice does not meet the eligibility criteria, you might consider picking up one 12-hour shift per month in an ICU-type setting to meet the clinical practice requirement and maintain your CCRN status." What's also changed is that there are now inactive, alumnus, and retired CCRN credentials available.
  10. by   RNforLongTime
    I have a BSN. Education is never a waste. I was the first member of my family on both my mother's and father's side to graduate college with a 4 year degree! It was the proudest moment of my life.

    I am also a new critical care RN having just completed my orientation. Since I am the most junior RN in the unit and because my job class requires it, I am floated out to the med-surg floors. I would like to get my CCRN eventually and am considering getting a one day a week job in an ICU at another hospital in my area. If all you need to obtain CCRN cert. is 12 hrs of bedside care of critical care pt's then I'm there!
  11. by   Jenny P
    I've been a CCRN off and on since 1977. (I'd had kids and couldn't get all my hours in back then). I didn't know they'd reduced the clinical hours so much! The last I'd read was one needed around 750 hours/year; and that was a far cry from back in the '70's.

    I have always felt that I was held to a higher level of standards because of the CCRN; but maybe that is just my expectation.

    As far as school pins, RNConnie, wear them both with pride if you wish to. I agree with a previous poster, though, you will be held to the RN standards of care; and it would not be necessary to pay to maintain your LPN license.
    Last edit by Jenny P on Jun 12, '02
  12. by   catlady
    Kaknurse and Jenny, the clinical requirements for initial CCRN certification are much more stringent than for recertification. The hard part for recert is getting the 100 CEUs (if you choose not to retake the exam), but even that has become easier. Used to be that 25 of those CEUs had to be directly related to critical care; now it's a vague reference to acutely ill patients.

    Jenny, perhaps you held *yourself* to a higher standard because you were a CCRN. I suppose many certified nurses do, but it's in their heart, not in the law.

    I would refer anyone interested in CCRN certification to http://www.certcorp.org/, AACN Certification Corporation's website.

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