Scariest things you've seen - page 8

What is the scariest thing you have seen other nurses do? We have all seen some pretty ignorant, or uncaring things. Just curious. Someone should probably write a book.... Read More

  1. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Rapheal
    Consulting doc walks up to me and says "your patient in 112 is not breathing." I rush in room thinking she is following me. Nope- she left.
    One morning, I was standing on the far end of a LONG hallway, I saw the renal attending and fellow round the corner and start down the hall toward me. Suddenly, the fellow darted into a patient room, followed more slowly by the attending. A visitor stumbled out, shrieking "He's not breathing! He's not breathing!" Naturally, I started running (TOWARD the code, not AWAY as the charge nurse did).

    When I got there, I found the renal fellow on the bed doing one-person CPR while the attending sat in a chair in the corner, legs crossed, making notes on another patient. Now why couldn't that attending have called a code? Assisted with CPR? Wandered off to look for the code cart, the charge nurse, a surgical resident, or comforted the hysterical wife?

    "It wasn't my patient," is what he said. I shouldn't have asked.
  2. by   CHATSDALE
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    One morning, I was standing on the far end of a LONG hallway, I saw the renal attending and fellow round the corner and start down the hall toward me. Suddenly, the fellow darted into a patient room, followed more slowly by the attending. A visitor stumbled out, shrieking "He's not breathing! He's not breathing!" Naturally, I started running (TOWARD the code, not AWAY as the charge nurse did).

    When I got there, I found the renal fellow on the bed doing one-person CPR while the attending sat in a chair in the corner, legs crossed, making notes on another patient. Now why couldn't that attending have called a code? Assisted with CPR? Wandered off to look for the code cart, the charge nurse, a surgical resident, or comforted the hysterical wife?

    "It wasn't my patient," is what he said. I shouldn't have asked.
    I have worked with a charge nurse whose job was a little too big for her(read peter principle) when ever there was a code (this was a cardiac and post-cab unit) she would just disappear...
  3. by   Gompers
    Quote from Repat
    He hadn't been assigned to anyone all night - he hadn't been seen once. Thank you know who that he was relatively stable and self care.
    After more than 5 years in the NICU, I still have nightmeres a few times a year that it's the end of my shift and I realize that I had ignored a patient all night long that I forgot I was assigned to. In my dreams, it's usually it's the boss who notices this mistake during her morning rounds, and when I go see the baby, it's almost always the same sight: a pale yellow emaciated baby, freezing cold, with multiple severe IV infiltrates, accidentally extubated, etc.

    **********************************

    The worst thing I ever saw...admitted a baby to from home who had recently been discharged with a trach, but no vent, due to anatomical issues. We put him back in the isolation room since he came in from home, so I was the only nurse back there with the respiratory therapist and admitting neo doc. Baby suddenly appears air hungry so the RT and I try to suction - nothing, the trach is completely plugged!!! We don't have an extra trach to change it with because the kid just came in from home, so we haven't yet ordered any supplies and we don't keep traches stocked on the unit. Doc comes over to help, and before we can do anything, suddenly blood comes pouring out of the kid's mouth, nose, and around the trach site. Baby goes limp, heart rate drops to the 20's within 2 seconds time. The doc freaks out, starts CPR, and yells for us to call a Peds code. We NEVER call a code team, because we handle the codes ourselves on our unit. So I know it's BAD, and the unit knows it's BAD. Doc tries to intubate since we have a plugged trach, but the brilliant respiratory therapist simply pulled the trach, stuck an ETT in the hole, and just held it in a few centimeters. Bagged the baby and within seconds the code was over, never even needed to give meds. Probably was only down for a minute or so, but it felt like en eternity. By the time the Peds code team got there, we were fine and just asked if by chance they had a 3.0 neo shiley with them? They wanted to smack us for giving them a heart attack!!! I've just never seen blood pouring out like that, we rarely see trauma in neonatal.

    The baby was fine - bottle feeding and smiling the next day like nothing had ever happened.
    Last edit by Gompers on Jul 26, '04
  4. by   MisfonzRN
    Quote from Mschrisco
    What is the scariest thing you have seen other nurses do? We have all seen some pretty ignorant, or uncaring things. Just curious. Someone should probably write a book.
    I work in the CCU recieved a patient from a med-surge floor c/o chest pain. The floor nurse had started a nitro drip prior to transfer. We use 50mg/ 250cc D5W. She had the pump set at 10mcg/kg/min. Mind you, this woman was 300 pounds. Luckily, the patient was hypertensive to begin with and did not bottom out. Scarry...:uhoh21:
  5. by   CHATSDALE
    MIZFONZRN....always pray that you get someone who knows what they are doing when you go into hospital....we had a pt in stepdown who while in icu received massive amt of lanoxin....all he could do was praise the hard working nurses who saved his life in icu when he "flatlined"
  6. by   jeepgirl
    hellp number one and dic number two - yeah, i was one of the "lucky" ones to get to see both during my labor/delivery/post partum rotations. very scary
    Last edit by jeepgirl on Jul 28, '04
  7. by   urbancowgirl
    But, let me guess, you came out of nursing school perfect and knowing everything already!!???... Not even a year of med/surg will teach you ANYTHING about L & D.
    Quote from woodruffn@hotmail.co
    A new grad just out of orientation on a busy L&D floor was drawing up Terbutaline for administration to a patient in preterm labor.

    I came around the corner of the med room to see her with a three cc syringe drawing up a full vial of terb. Terb is given with a tb syringe 0.25mg sq.

    When I took a tb syringe off the shelf and pointed to the correct dosage she said uhuh, and proceeded to throw the vial away.

    At that time I took a new vial and showed her the dosage and had her review the orders for terb. She said that is a lesson she won't forget.

    I have a hard time with new grads in L&D because of their lack of knowledge and their lack of not knowing what they don't know! Nan
  8. by   Jamesdotter
    <<I have worked with a charge nurse whose job was a little too big for her(read peter principle) when ever there was a code she would just disappear...>>

    I had an instructor in nursing school who did that. She left us to become the DON in a small community hospital.....
  9. by   MisfonzRN
    Quote from urbancowgirl
    But, let me guess, you came out of nursing school perfect and knowing everything already!!???... Not even a year of med/surg will teach you ANYTHING about L & D.
    Point taken. We all make mistakes, but as a licensed RN, you are responsible for knowing about the medications you are administering. If you are not, you should ask, or look it up. Medication errors cause a lot of deaths in hospitals.

    Just my two cents...
  10. by   teeituptom
    Quote from MisfonzRN
    Point taken. We all make mistakes, but as a licensed RN, you are responsible for knowing about the medications you are administering. If you are not, you should ask, or look it up. Medication errors cause a lot of deaths in hospitals.

    Just my two cents...

    If that is your 2 cents, what do we get for a quarter
  11. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from Ruby Vee

    When I got there, I found the renal fellow on the bed doing one-person CPR while the attending sat in a chair in the corner, legs crossed, making notes on another patient. Now why couldn't that attending have called a code? Assisted with CPR? Wandered off to look for the code cart, the charge nurse, a surgical resident, or comforted the hysterical wife?

    "It wasn't my patient," is what he said. I shouldn't have asked.
    it makes me want to SPIT when i hear "it wasn't my patient". get these freaks out of healthcare. :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire
  12. by   jannecdote
    A CNA responsible for getting vitals down one hall comes to the nursing station AFTER she is finished and says that she was unable to get vitals on Mrs. X. The primary nurse goes down to get vitals on the lady and discovers why the CNA couldn't get any readings--the patient has expired.

    An RN related this story to me. It happened when she was an LPN. She was working with a fairly new BSN nurse who looked down on all nurses without a BSN and thought she knew everything. (That is scary in itself.) My friend's patient had a peg and a central line for fluids. There was a new order for Dilantin elixir and the BSN, who was charging, went to give it, thinking it was meant to be given IVP. My friend happened to be in the room, and when she realized what BSN was about to do, told her it was not meant to be given IV but via the peg. The BSN said something to the effect that she had more education and she knew what the heck she was doing and was going to proceed. :uhoh21: My friend had to literally grab this nurse's arm and tell her that she was not going to let her give this med IVP and that she had better go look it up in the drug book. BSN got all huffy and went to look it up in the PDR. Needless to say, it went down the peg.
  13. by   kcrnsue
    I gave report the the oncoming day shift that unit #2 of blood had just been hung on mr. x. After 12 hr shift- report was given that the blood (unit #2) was almost done infusing.

close