Scariest thing you have found - page 7

What is the scariest thing that you have stumbled across after following someone else? I found that a Dopamine drip had been started and left on all weekend on my medical floor that had staffing... Read More

  1. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Originally posted by Fire Wolf
    I feel that the facility pushed the new grads and new hires out onto the units before they were properly trained and ready in order to boast that they had RN coverage back then.
    Back in MY day, LOL!

    I remember my first job. My charge nurse had six months experience. Us three "new" grads were in AWE at her skill and expertise, LOL!

    We made out ok tho', I don't know how!

    Maybe that's why I switched to ICU after 3 months -- so I could have seniority backing.

    But Donna did a great job, and unflappable! We know today that "flapping" is very important tho'! MAKE SOME NOISE girls!

    I had 8 medical patients last nite including one ventilator patient and a new admission.

    What do you guys get?
  2. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Originally posted by janesny
    Soon we had another nurse for the rest of the shift.
    Good.
  3. by   Ruby Vee
    Twenty or so years ago, I was working on a General Medicine floor. We still did team nursing . . . NA does the vital signs, RN does the meds, etc. for 15 patients. At about 0845, still passing my "0800" meds, I entered a patient room and found the patient deader than a doornail. We did the whole code thing, which was shortened considerably by the fact that we found rigor mortis. Afterward, checking through the chart I found midnight, 0400 and 0800 vital signs charted -- all normal. Funny thing, the patient's 24 hour Holter monitor showed VT at 2330, followed by VF and asystole. The night RN was fired for "failure to supervise," and I was counselled. Both NAs were still working there when I left six months later!

    Ruby Vee
  4. by   mattsmom81
    Originally posted by Ruby Vee
    Twenty or so years ago, I was working on a General Medicine floor. We still did team nursing . . . NA does the vital signs, RN does the meds, etc. for 15 patients. At about 0845, still passing my "0800" meds, I entered a patient room and found the patient deader than a doornail. We did the whole code thing, which was shortened considerably by the fact that we found rigor mortis. Afterward, checking through the chart I found midnight, 0400 and 0800 vital signs charted -- all normal. Funny thing, the patient's 24 hour Holter monitor showed VT at 2330, followed by VF and asystole. The night RN was fired for "failure to supervise," and I was counselled. Both NAs were still working there when I left six months later!

    Ruby Vee
    These stories upset me, because in this day of too many UAP's on duty and not enough nurses, we see how nurses can STILL held accountable when bad things happen.
  5. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Originally posted by Ruby Vee
    Both NAs were still working there when I left six months later!
    Wha??????
  6. by   AHarri66
    This is by no means as serious as many incidents posted here, but it had the potential for it...and this just happened last week.

    Left my general failure (hx of MRSA) pt from day shift with an Aquacel dressing to a 1cm x 1cm superficial decub to the coccyx, ordered to be changed BID. I come in the next day to find a 2cm x 2cm AND 1cm x 1cm bleeding Stage II TOTALLY SLATHERED with Silvadene! The skin in the entire area was sloughing off!

    This patient had two wounds to dress...one on the coccyx, and one on the lower leg. The leg dressing ONLY was to be Silvadene (which was totally slathered, too, complete with bleeding and sloughing skin).

    The night nurse had even copied the Medex that night and transcribed the dressing changes correctly, but didn't perform them that way! That same night she gave another of my pt's her Crohn's meds (sheduled for 0800, 1600, and 2000) at 2000 AND 0200! The kicker of that one is that she only gave ONE HALF of the dose at 0200! Screwed up my 0800 dose, too.

    This nurse is SCAREY! When listening to her report on a CHF patient, she won't tell you lung sounds, O2 sats, I/O's, edema status, or heart rate/rhythm....but she WILL tell you they have bowel sounds x 4!!!
    Last edit by AHarri66 on Jun 6, '03
  7. by   healingtouchRN
    con-graduations! I noticed that you grad today! I hope you day goes well!!!!
  8. by   NotReady4PrimeTime
    Here in the Great White North, when we talk about 2/3-1/3, we're referring to 3.3% Dextrose, 0.3% Sodium. It isn't really "two thirds-one thirds", but more like two threes-one three. Comes commercially prepared, we use it for mixing our morphine gtts.
  9. by   NotReady4PrimeTime
    Now that I've got that out of the way...

    A few years back, I came on a night shift and got report from a very senior nurse who had worked neonatal forever, a meticulous nurse, one who paid great attention to detail. I'm assessing my patient, a little 1100 gm 30-weeker with NEC. Oops, there's blood almost the entire length of the silastic CVC her TPN is running into. Come to find out that the IV tubing had been put into the pump upside down and instead of pushing the TPN into the pt, it was pulling blood out of her. She was fine.

    Then there was the newbee nurse only about 8 months into her career who put a peds pt's p.o. meds into the balloon port on the foley we were temporarily using as a GT until the stoma matured and we could place a button. "A one-way med port on a GT! How cool is that?" she says.

    I think the scariest thing I've seen so far is the 11 year old trauma with the shredded gut who became hypotensive after a small dose of fentanyl during rounds. She was a little antsy while I was trying to give report, so the attending said to give her 50 of fentanyl. Since she had already had two arrests, I gave it very slowly over a good five minutes. Within minutes her BP was 40/20. The attending then walked over to the pump tree and turned up (and UP) the epi. Next time I look her BP was now 240/120!! With all the vascular damage she had in her gut, I was afraid she was going to blow a gasket! In the end we didn't save her, but thank TPTB that we didn't "kill" her.:wink2:
  10. by   nrw350
    what is "TPTB "?

    Thanks.
  11. by   NotReady4PrimeTime
    The Powers That Be... you're welcome.
  12. by   nrw350
    Personally I find it hard to believe than anyone with a bp of 40/20 could be stable. I also understand how dangerous 240/120 is bad since I have hypertension. I think I would be dead if ever my bp was that high.
  13. by   NurseAngie
    Originally posted by night owl
    Not the scariest, but certainly the most cruelest. Worked psych one night. The next morning, a pt c/o his feet were hurting so bad and would it be ok for him to have breakfast in his room. (He had gout). Charge nurse said, "NO, it's not allowed!" So the pt ever so slowly and in a great deal of pain shuffled to the dinning room. The kitchen aid went to hand him his tray and the charge nurse said, "'Oops, breakfast is over" and made the kitchen aid put his tray back. I asked her what was that all about, and she said, "He took too long." Oh really? I gave him his tray when she left the room. Explained what happened to the Unit manager when she arrived, wrote her up and the ***** was suspended for three days! Thought she should have been admitted to the psych ward for that little stunt...
    This one really bothered me. It was deliberate. I hope this "nurse" found a different line of work.

    ~Angie

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