Save my Newbie!

  1. I am in the process of orienting a Shiny Brand New Nurse. From what I've seen working with her she is smart, compassionate, caring and willing to learn. She asks questions and lets me know if she didn't understand my answer. The problem, the one day I have off, one of the trouble making patients went after her. When I am there, the patient is kind to her. All the patients know I will do my best for them, all I ask is no funny business. Well, today work called & asked me to come in (on my second day off), to try to get this patient off the back of my trainie. Part of the problem is that this particular patient doesn't like most of the Nurses who work there. I don't know why and she refuses to tell me, she says she likes them all, but, she gives them nothing but grief. How do I convince this patient to NOT go after Newbie, I'm afraid she will be scared off by this patient! Any advice will be appreciated!!
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   azhiker96
    Use this as a learning experience for your orientee. Reassure her that she is doing well and that the problem is not with her. She will have difficult patients from time to time. Learning how to deal with them and not take it personally is part of the job.
    You sound like a great preceptor. Thank you for taking a new nurse under your wing. I'm sure she'll be a great nurse with your guidance.
  4. by   kiszi
    You can't change the patient..
    I think you're doing all you can by giving her your support. I agree that difficult patients are just a part of nursing, and the sooner she learns that the better. Maybe talk about some ways she could handle it or responses she could give if the pt. gives her a hard time?
  5. by   Ruby Vee
    i agree with the previous poster. you cannot change the patient, but you can teach your newbie that difficult patients are a part of the job. not a pleasant part, and not something she may want to deal with, but a part of the job. hopefully the rest of the job makes up for the parts you don't like . . . and with a preceptor like yourself, that's pretty likely.
  6. by   gentlegiver
    Thank You all for replying. Your right, I know it, (I was hoping you all would say it was ok to put patient in a closet) she's just so new this will be a tough lesson, one I was hoping I could teach her when she feels more confident. I had a great preceptor, I try to be like her, and I try to remember what it feels like to be ignored or worse.
  7. by   kiszi
    Quote from gentlegiver
    I was hoping you all would say it was ok to put patient in a closet
  8. by   HelenofOz
    You sound like a fabulous preceptor, and your newbie is very lucky to have you helping her.


    I am just looking at this from a different angle, why hasn't has your manager/supervisor/higher-up the food chain person dealt with this problem patient. It shouldn't be all your responsiblity to help fix a problem that shouldn't have gone this far.

    As to coming in on your day off, I assume they are going to pay you for it.
  9. by   gentlegiver
    Quote from HelenofOz
    You sound like a fabulous preceptor, and your newbie is very lucky to have you helping her.


    I am just looking at this from a different angle, why hasn't has your manager/supervisor/higher-up the food chain person dealt with this problem patient. It shouldn't be all your responsiblity to help fix a problem that shouldn't have gone this far.

    As to coming in on your day off, I assume they are going to pay you for it.
    Unfortunately, the Admin. takes the side of the patients no matter what, he wants to keep the beds full. This patient has been spoken to many times by DON & ADON & Psych, she knows nothing will be done. Hense, her behaviors continue, tho I don't know why she doesn't pull this stuff on me, it could be that she knows I won't tolerate it. She tried once when she was new to the unit, I confronted her, never had a problem since. I just don't want my Newbie scared off.

    And yes I will get paid for coming in. (tho to save Newbie, I would consider coming in on my own time to put patient straight, I just wouldn't tell employer that )
  10. by   Miller86
    You sound like an amazing nurse/preceptor! Wish I was as lucky to have a mentor like that, someone caring enough to precept and support in all aspects. I have no advice but to thank you for supporting newbies into the nursing world
  11. by   jrw03282009
    I hope that when I get out in the "real" world, I have someone like you to take me by the shoelaces! I have one more month left!

  12. by   Well-Seasoned
    If you have a case manager or social worker available I would initiate a consult.You can do that as an RN. In my facility our case management and or social worker would draw up a contract with this patient and set limits regarding her behaviour. When these limits are crossed the case manager or social worker returns for a follow up. Thes are pretty effective. I would check into that option at your facility. It is appropriate to delegate in these situations. Rn's cannot do everthing and should not be expexted to come in on their days off. Also if you have an ethics commitee you could utilise them also. Your nurse manager need not be a part of this and I think it would be a very proactive thing to do.
  13. by   gentlegiver
    Quote from Well-Seasoned
    If you have a case manager or social worker available I would initiate a consult.You can do that as an RN. In my facility our case management and or social worker would draw up a contract with this patient and set limits regarding her behaviour. When these limits are crossed the case manager or social worker returns for a follow up. Thes are pretty effective. I would check into that option at your facility. It is appropriate to delegate in these situations. Rn's cannot do everthing and should not be expexted to come in on their days off. Also if you have an ethics commitee you could utilise them also. Your nurse manager need not be a part of this and I think it would be a very proactive thing to do.

    I'm am LPN, in this case the DON or ADON have to do it, and they have. But in LTC/Rehab, patients have all the rights, you really can't punish them, they are (supposed to be) adults. But I can drop a line to Social Services, think thats a good idea. Thank you
  14. by   EMR*LPN
    You said it in your original post. "The pt knows I won't tolerate her nehavior" . The key is to have your newbie set the boundaries with this pt. Let the newbie approach this pt like you would, but with her own style. Once this pt realizes she can't intimidate this new nurse, the boundaries will be set. In theory it should work. I've had success with this approach from pts to doctors. Good luck...

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