SaO2 monitors - page 2

I was just wondering if any of you fellow nurses out there have you own SaO2 monitor? I also have been looking for some links but can't find what I'm looking for... Any help will be... Read More

  1. by   night owl
    About how much would one of these cost?
  2. by   gwenith
    Nialloh - buying your own is a commendable thing to do and probably tax deductable but the issue remains that it saved YOU time ergo haveing more and better would save everyone's time. In the inerest of unit efficiency a submission for better equipment can do you no harm.

    The disempowerment of nurses has taught us soem bad management practices one is to complain to each other instead of petitioning the correct people with a workable solution.
  3. by   MelRN13
    I think that the most frustrating part is that you cannot find one when you need one.

    The problem with the pocket sized ones is that they tend to go home in peoples pockets.

    I don't really think that there is a viable solution, unless they could somehow be built in to the room, similar to other "permanent" fixture equimpment.
  4. by   nialloh
    Originally posted by night owl
    About how much would one of these cost?
    I got mine new out of the box on ebay. For a top of the line handheld, I paid $450 aprox. Should have been a lot more.
    A friend got one of the smallfinger units for aprox $350. The problem with these are easy to lose, they are very small and light.


    Originally posted by TeleNurse_02
    The problem with the pocket sized ones is that they tend to go home in peoples pockets.
    As I said, have a belt pouch and never put it down. When you pay for it, you tend to be very protective of it.
  5. by   canoehead
    There is no way I would shell out 300-400 dollars for a piece of equipment that should already be provided. If a patient needed one I would chart that there were none available if there weren't.
  6. by   nialloh
    Originally posted by canoehead
    There is no way I would shell out 300-400 dollars for a piece of equipment that should already be provided. If a patient needed one I would chart that there were none available if there weren't.
    The way I look at it is I spent that money on me. We do have them on the unit, but having my own makes my life easer.
    I also get to take it home with me. When my father had bipass surgery, he had resp problems. I tell you, I was very happy to have it then. It has paid for itself many times over IMHO.
  7. by   canoehead
    Let me add that if it makes your life easier by $300 worth you have my absolute backing to buy anything your little heart desires. But the hospital should not get the idea that nurses are going to do this so they don't have to provide adequate equipment; and you know they will.

    Did you know that they will sell AED's to private individuals to have in their homes, just in case? And they don't mention how often spending those thousands has actually saved a life, as opposed to, say, a puppy to walk every day. I'm saving my pennies for when the pocket sized ones come out.
    Last edit by canoehead on Jul 14, '03
  8. by   nialloh
    Originally posted by canoehead
    Let me add that if it makes your life easier by $300 worth you have may absolute backing to buy anything your little heart desires. But the hospital should not get the idea that nurses are going to do this so they don't have to provide adequate equipment, and you know they will.
    You have that straight

close