Run out of nursing school - what to do? - page 6

Greetings all, I started my last semester of my RN program very badly. My clinical instructor and I had a serious personality clash. It snowballed into a big mess. I forgot that the instructor is... Read More

  1. by   Michael076
    Quote from Diahni
    Greetings all,
    I started my last semester of my RN program very badly. My clinical instructor and I had a serious personality clash. It snowballed into a big mess. I forgot that the instructor is always right. There are many chapters to this which I won't bore anybody with, other than the final one. I was made to sign a contract that said, among other things, that I would meet with the lab instructor once a week through February. After my first meeting with her, I came home to find an email from the dean of nursing saying I was going to be thrown out of the program because I did not pass my lab exam. I wasn't aware that I was being tested when I went to see the lab instructor. Throughout this crisis, I attempted to contact my advisor, other teachers, the dean, and so on. No one responded to me. I have such a bad taste in my mouth about how the entire episode happened that I don't think I would want to continue in this program even if I was allowed. Has anyone had an experience like this? Right now, my strategy is to look into other programs. I will probably have to spend a longer time in school, but I have no choice. Please advise!
    Diahni

    Were you working many hours while in school? What led to you having to do the lab work to begin with? Believe me I am not placing blame, I do not know the complete details pertaining to your situation. However I was fired from a high paying job a few years back which I was not fond of anyway and really stopped putting forth my best effort. After 2 years of placing blame on everyone else I reflected and realized that is was nobodies fault but my own. This doesn't make me a bad person I was just working in an environment where my true talents could not thrive.

    While reading your post it reminded me of how angry I was at my manager but in truth I was mad at myself. She told me to practice my presentations but quite frankly I kept winging it because I hated selling and was burnt out. I am guessing you could have worked a bit harder and got those skills mastered. Again, i don't know the details but in my experience this is normally the case.

    For example last week my nursing notes were a little sloppy at clinical. This week I practiced writing them so i'm prepared for the next time.

    I'm sorry to hear what happened and I hope everything works out for you. It does sound unfair that the school was not forthcoming in telling you about the lab testing. If you were putting forth the effort they could have been more flexible. I hope you are being honest and were putting forth the effort because I have no sympathy for students who complain about failing a test/pratice skill that they never really studied for. Those students have to take acountability for their own actions. Well good luck.
  2. by   Diahni
    [quote=Gennaver;2080111]Hi,
    Oh, I would bet that direct entry programs are indeed just as tough as associate ones.

    We lost three men in the last two quarters of my program. Our program concludes this june.

    So, yeah, the programs are equally about personalities and teamwork as it is about the grades, integrity, clinicals and skils.

    Hi,
    Isn't this true in so much of life? I hear one can't get tenure without being well-liked by the rest of an academic department. Then I know of a guy who worked hard to get a big grant for his company department, only to see the job go to someone the boss apparently was more friendly with. Sure, one can always make it look like something else, but people have a tendency to be "tribal" and go with those in their own tribes, which is very unfair.
    Diahni
  3. by   Diahni
    While reading your post it reminded me of how angry I was at my manager but in truth I was mad at myself. She told me to practice my presentations but quite frankly I kept winging it because I hated selling and was burnt out. I am guessing you could have worked a bit harder and got those skills mastered. Again, i don't know the details but in my experience this is normally the case.

    Michael,
    To be sure, my attitude was suffering greatly. I absolutely loathe these women, you have no idea. This is generally true in the program. No love lost between students and teachers. That said, some people can just put their heads to the grindstone. Long story short, I'm glad I bailed, and found a better situation. Thanks for your comments!
  4. by   Diahni
    Quote from Tiwi
    How can they get away with not notifying you that a lab session is an exam? I have to agree with sonicnurse; that should be clear from the start! Studying's an expensive business both financially and mentally. Like everyone else here, I support you and best of luck
    Tiwi and Sonicnurse,
    The bottom line is the school is always right - I wouldn't even waste my time in an endeavor that would prompt them to point out all the ways in which I was wrong. As for the money, I withdrew without the requisite filing of a grievance, etc. Just didn't have the stomach for it. As it turns out, I'm very happy about finishing with an online program. So I lost a bit more than a thousand dollars. Truth be told, I'd spend far more than that to never have to lay eyes on these creepy women for the rest of my life. Honestly. Life can be very expensive, but I learned much about what I'm willing to put up with and what I'm unwilling to do. I'd rather not get in a peeing contest with skunks, if you know what I mean.
    Diahni
  5. by   Diahni
    (fwiw my program tuition alone is 42,000 dollars-big investment to get booted out of ).
    Gen[/quote]
    Gennaver,
    OUCH! That's a whole lotta money for nothing! There's really something wrong with a system that doesn't figure out until the bitter end that you don't have what it takes. My experience is this determination is extremely subjective, as well. It's pretty heartbreaking to see somebody waste that kind of money. In some parts of the country, that could almost buy you a house! Nursing programs seem to call all the shots.
    Diahni
  6. by   Diahni
    Quote from TrudyRN
    No one told you it was a test??? No one would get back to you??? :uhoh21:


    You need to start at the start and get to the bottom of this. I, also, would not throw in the towel without a major battle if I were at the last semester. Surely you've had some warnings and notices along the way and this is not happening out of the blue??? Fight it.
    Hi Trudy,
    Yeah, no indication of the troubles, but this is how it is. A person can be doing famously, bomb one test, and out they go. It is a heartless system, yet it's couched in terms of "safety." I'd rather go someplace smarter, kinder and all-around closer to my concept of how human beings should treat each other.
    Diahni
  7. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Quote from Gennaver
    (fwiw my program tuition alone is 42,000 dollars-big investment to get booted out of ).
    Gen

    Incomprehensible! I forget what mine was - back in 1981 - but it was definitely MUCH LESS! I can't IMAGINE 42,000! oh my! especially given the shortages...
  8. by   Jogirl
    Hi Everyone,
    I have been reading your comments on the nursing schools and feeling a little intmidated. I will be applying in fall to several schools in the central valley: MJC,Delta, Stan. State... Does anyone have a suggestion of which is the best program? Thanks for the input.
  9. by   Tiwi
    Quote from Diahni
    Tiwi and Sonicnurse,
    I lost a bit more than a thousand dollars. Truth be told, I'd spend far more than that to never have to lay eyes on these creepy women for the rest of my life. Honestly. Life can be very expensive, but I learned much about what I'm willing to put up with and what I'm unwilling to do. I'd rather not get in a peeing contest with skunks, if you know what I mean.
    Diahni
    You must be a very focused person, to be able to move on, especially if they have affected your financial situation.
  10. by   VickyRN
    Entering this conversation very late and have not read all the posts. Just want to add that I have taught in both an ADN and a BSN program (present position). Without a doubt, the BSN program is more student-friendly and vested in student retention. We are even piloting a program in which faculty members are assigned "at risk" nursing students to mentor, to improve our retention rates.
  11. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Quote from Jogirl
    Hi Everyone,
    I have been reading your comments on the nursing schools and feeling a little intmidated. I will be applying in fall to several schools in the central valley: MJC,Delta, Stan. State... Does anyone have a suggestion of which is the best program? Thanks for the input.

    Hi, I haven't answered because I'm not in your area. There is a forum dedicated to your own state where perhaps you can ask the question - good luck!


    Quote from VickyRN
    We are even piloting a program in which faculty members are assigned "at risk" nursing students to mentor, to improve our retention rates.

    That is just FANTASTIC, I love that idea! Cool!


    I think it would be good too if similar intervention was made during orientation for new grads, don't you think? So they don't reach the end of probation and find out they weren't "getting it"?
  12. by   Diahni
    Quote from zoeboboey
    Hi, I haven't answered because I'm not in your area. There is a forum dedicated to your own state where perhaps you can ask the question - good luck!

    That is just FANTASTIC, I love that idea! Cool!

    So do I!

    I think it would be good too if similar intervention was made during orientation for new grads, don't you think? So they don't reach the end of probation and find out they weren't "getting it"?
    Yes, some things are not obvious to somebody who has never worked as an LPN. One of the strange aspects of the program I was in was that absolutely no teaching to speak of happened during clinicals. If you didn't "get it" during the labs, you'd find yourself with an "incident report" as a way of discovering how much you didn't "get it." Worse, in our program, many of the "professors" have BSNs and not a clue about teaching. How could they, as they weren't trained as such? At an even more basic level, I'd say you'd have to like students and people in general to teach. It's all but a bad nightmare to me at this point.
  13. by   TrudyRN
    OUCH! That's a whole lotta money for nothing! There's really something wrong with a system that doesn't figure out until the bitter end that you don't have what it takes. My experience is this determination is extremely subjective, as well. It's pretty heartbreaking to see somebody waste that kind of money. In some parts of the country, that could almost buy you a house! Nursing programs seem to call all the shots.
    Diahni[/quote]

    I think some Deans pressure the instructors in lower level classes to pass everyone.

    Then, the students who really can't make the grade without team projects, group projects, open book tests, and very lenient instructors, those students fail at the end. What should happen is that high standards should be imposed from the beginning so that, if a student is going to fail, she would fail early and not waste her time and money.

    Perhaps it comes down to the schools want that tuition money?

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