Run out of nursing school - what to do? - page 2

Greetings all, I started my last semester of my RN program very badly. My clinical instructor and I had a serious personality clash. It snowballed into a big mess. I forgot that the instructor is... Read More

  1. by   caliotter3
    Sorry to hear about your problems. Believe me, you are not the only one, many students get blindsided. Do what you need to do to get into another program. If not possible, since I think you stated you have completed more than 50% of your current program, then enter Excelsior College as a last resort. All of the nurses (notice I said nurses) that I met who got raw deals from my school (BSN program) were able to get admitted to, and finish in local ASN programs. Try every nrsg school in your area. But before you go for the interview, make certain that you carefully think through what went wrong, and what you intend to do to see that there is not a repeat of anything on your part. Good luck.
  2. by   peds4now
    the environment in so many nursing schools is very toxic. Someone posted about the history of nursing and turning women compliant, and that seems very much to be the approach. Most people choose the "keep your head down" technique, but that is a very hard habit to break and makes for a very meaningless and sometimes even unethical life. Definitely choose your battles, but don't be afraid. If you have the time, are too burnt out, and need a rest, consider other programs. If you have a B.A./S., consider a direct entry MSN or a quick bridge BSN. But don't burn your bridges yet. Read and reread that agreement you signed. Does it say you will be judged at your first meeting with the lab instructor? Is the lab a resource where students can go to learn, or a testing area? Are your skills so behind that maybe you do need remedial work, or are they making things up? Can you get on a list to reenter this toxic program, just as a backup?

    I've had horrible run ins with my school. The humiliation and "forced powerlessness" of being a nursing student well into my adulthood steered me to do some stupid, juvenile things when they acted unfairly towards me. I live in fear that I'm on the "hit list" to be arbitrarily flunked by my clinical teacher (since their grading is very subjective they can do that, and we've seen it in our program a few times now)-but I'm in my last semester and I'm keeping my head down baby!
  3. by   Diahni
    Quote from Don3218
    I feel horrible that you had to leave in your last semester. I understand that the situation at your school was very toxic.

    I wish you much luck and success in your new program.
    Thanks, Don!
  4. by   Ms.RN
    hmm... i wonder if you cant do same thing as what i've done. i finished first year of adn , then failed the med-surg class of second year. the lpn program classes are exactly same as the first year of adn program, so i applied to lpn program, and i only had to take 3 more classes, and i became lpn. after that, i applied to lpn to rn program which is going to take me one year. if you do that, then you only have one more year of nursing school instead of starting all over and take 2 years.
  5. by   Diahni
    Quote from wantobern
    hmm... i wonder if you cant do same thing as what i've done. i finished first year of adn , then failed the med-surg class of second year. the lpn program classes are exactly same as the first year of adn program, so i applied to lpn program, and i only had to take 3 more classes, and i became lpn. after that, i applied to lpn to rn program which is going to take me one year. if you do that, then you only have one more year of nursing school instead of starting all over and take 2 years.
    good strategy! i'm going to be talking to a lot of schools to figure out the best way to do it. what you describe is a common route for some of the people who dropped out of this adn problem. when there's a will, there's a way!
    diahni
  6. by   Ms.RN
    hey, i know what you are going through because i've thorug exactly the same thing. dont give up!!!! and dont take how your nursing school treated you personally either. its just a matter of finding a good nursing school. i found a good nursing school in which they are very supportive of nursing students. plus, i found that nursing school is much easier when i went back to school since i have a experience of real nursing world. soon or later, you are going to be a nurse. :angel2: so until then my friend, hang in there!!!! :kiss
  7. by   Ginger35
    If you are in your last semester of nursing school and held your end of the deal up honoring the contract, I would definitely re-evaluate WHY you are being kicked out. One of my fellow nursing students was "kicked out" for alleged cheating in our last semester. She wasn't cheating and went to her attorney. The attorney negotiated a deal for her. She stayed in and graduated.

    I think this is a bunch of crap that they let you go through nursing school, spend the time and money to attend thinking you are doing okay - only to be let go the final semester??? Something smells bad here. Worse than a GI Bleed BM!!!

    I don't think you would have anything to lose seeking counsel to figure out what your options are. I think starting in another program will just set you back needlessly. Also, fighting back through the appropriate channels will let them know that they can not take advantage of their students.

    This kind of draconian nursing academia is for the birds!!! We are there to learn, not to be taken advantage of!!!
  8. by   SeanyRN
    Quote from Diahni
    Greetings all,
    I started my last semester of my RN program very badly. My clinical instructor and I had a serious personality clash. It snowballed into a big mess. I forgot that the instructor is always right. There are many chapters to this which I won't bore anybody with, other than the final one. I was made to sign a contract that said, among other things, that I would meet with the lab instructor once a week through February. After my first meeting with her, I came home to find an email from the dean of nursing saying I was going to be thrown out of the program because I did not pass my lab exam. I wasn't aware that I was being tested when I went to see the lab instructor. Throughout this crisis, I attempted to contact my advisor, other teachers, the dean, and so on. No one responded to me. I have such a bad taste in my mouth about how the entire episode happened that I don't think I would want to continue in this program even if I was allowed. Has anyone had an experience like this? Right now, my strategy is to look into other programs. I will probably have to spend a longer time in school, but I have no choice. Please advise!
    Diahni
    I swear the responses I see on this board are making me sick!!! To the nurses who say quit, run out, do not pass go, are coawards and are part of the reason why nurses are so disrespected!! I went through a harder time that 99% of the people here. I had to speak in front of the the president of the university and the board of trustees. I had a teacher fail me because she didnt like me. After I fought and won I was treated like a GOD by the teaching staff including the dean! Teachers and students congratulated me on my perseverance. If you quit in your last or even first semester b/c of a teacher they were most likely right. You nurses who said quit and start over again are the type of nurses that get stepped on everyday at work. RESPECT for yourself means standing up for your rights in any situation no matter how tough! This is why we need more men in nursing!:angryfire
  9. by   caliotter3
    The way I read the first post by the OP, the dean of the school emailed her and told her that she was being kicked out of the program. I didn't get that she had quit. Either way, she is on the short end of this stick. And I know of many people who have fought all the way. End of story, out of program. With or without attorney fees. SeanyRN, congratulations on winning your fight. Please do not castigate everyone else in this boat. Most people do not win this fight. You are the exception, not the rule.
  10. by   Ginger35
    Dear Diahni,

    What measuring stick did they use to make the decision to dismiss you from the program? They have to prove on measurable terms where your weaknesses are are how you are not meeting their expectations - if they can't do that - I find it hard that they would have any cause to dismiss you based on subjective perceptions or personality conflicts.
  11. by   Batman24
    If I had only 12 weeks to go in the program and good grades/clinicals prior to this I would fight like hell to graduate. I would have sent a certified letter return receipt to the person in charge to request a meeting and see if there was a way I could finish out. You have so much time and money invested and so little left to finish that it might be worth the effort to see if there is some way you can pass.
  12. by   Rabid Badger
    The one thing that I don't get from your posts are any personal responsibility. Somehow it's all the school's fault, its a conspiracy theory, they're out to get you.

    Occam's razor would suggest that there is a reason why they have put you on probation and learning contracts. The Dean doesn't get involved for fun. I have seen many a student nurse failed in their last term or in practicum, often because they were clearly lacking, but for some reason were passed through earlier clinicals. Better to fail them in school than to put them out on the wards and kill a patient.

    The fact that you do not offer up any semblance of responsiblity suggests to me that there might be some truth to the allegations.
  13. by   nurse4theplanet
    I too think some pieces of the story are being omitted.

    Quote from Diahni
    There are many chapters to this which I won't bore anybody with, other than the final one. I was made to sign a contract that said, among other things, that I would meet with the lab instructor once a week through February.
    I think it is important for us understand why you were required to sign this contract to meet with the lab instructor. That seems like an unusual request of a nursing student unless they were performing poorly.

    Another thing...if you signed a contract to meet with her once a week throughout February, then how can they dismiss you after one session? What did your contract say? What were the terms? Do you have a copy?

    After my first meeting with her, I came home to find an email from the dean of nursing saying I was going to be thrown out of the program because I did not pass my lab exam. I wasn't aware that I was being tested when I went to see the lab instructor.
    Again, did you not ask what exactly was being required of you when you sign the contract? Did the contract state that they could boot you from the program if you did not meet necessary criteria set forth by these lab meetings?

    It was nuts, but I beat them to the punch. Many students flunk out in the last semester, it must be so frustrating.
    I don't understand this...does this mean you quit?

    ... after a pow-wow with the dean, she said I was supposed to strengthen my med-surg skills throughout February in order to remain in the program. ... It is toally my fault that my med-surg routine suffered. I don't question this for one minute. But the "contract" told me to work with the lab woman on my assessment skills, etc. I did so, and after one session was booted out. The dean said as much in an email to me which said I did not prepare for the lab session. ... Had I known, I would have spent the weekend preparing for it, but I thought the lab sessions were supposed to be a remedial workshop, which I was greatful for.
    I can tell you one thing, no student met with the dean unless there where some serious underlying issues. Your program may be different.

    I also don't know anyone in their right mind that would walk away from what they had accomplished with only twelve more weeks until graduation. Especially, if they knew they were 'right.' You said yourself that the school is toxic, a hell hole, and that other schools are the same...so why would you give up on all your progress to begin from square one somewhere else.

    Another thing, if you are forced to sign a written contract for a remedial class...the last thing I would do is not prepare. I'm glad you can own up to that mistake.

    We took time off between Med-Surg I and Advanced Med-Surg for OB, Pediatrics, and Psych...to the tune of almost 8 months. However, we were still accountable for being current in our Med-Surg skills. You may have had good evaluations in clinicals previous to this matter, however, if you were in your final semester and needed basic Med-Surg remediation then there was a problem.



    My intent is not to be hard on you, but I don't feel as if we are getting all the information here. There are several aspects of your story that just don't make any sense. If I were you I would fight their decision and finish my 12 weeks so I could get my license and never have to deal with them again. You have your written contract as evidence of what was expected of you...they should be held accountable to those standards. Good luck.

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