Rude remarks by doc with his own kids - page 7

:uhoh21:last night when i got to work, i was pulled to another floor which did not bother me. as i went walking up the nurse's station, which sits right in front of the elevators, i seen one of our... Read More

  1. by   BellaCerraRN
    Quote from TiredMD
    Maybe he was talking about his ex-wife . . . just kidding.

    I have known a number of physicians who round with their children in tow, including one who would wear the "baby-backpack" and round with his sleeping infant. I don't think there is anything particularly wrong with this, nor is it prohibited by any law or regulation that I am aware of.
    There is definitely something wrong with a Dr. rounding with his children (I guess an infant wouldn't apply) it's called a violation of HIPPA!

    In our facility this would not be tolerated. The administration is very strict about Physician conduct and has had to tell more than a few docs that they are not employees of the hospital but the nurses are and that the docs are GRANTED the priveledge of practicing there but they will not be allowed to abuse the hospitals employees while doing so.
  2. by   sternalrub
    I understand your unhappiness but can I suggest you work on your writing skills or maybe read what you have written before you send it.
  3. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from TiredMD
    Maybe he was talking about his ex-wife . . . just kidding.

    I have known a number of physicians who round with their children in tow, including one who would wear the "baby-backpack" and round with his sleeping infant. I don't think there is anything particularly wrong with this, nor is it prohibited by any law or regulation that I am aware of.
    __________________________________________________ ___________

    Well, if it isn't against hospital policy, it should be! Young kids are known incubators of many communicable diseases, and at one time, a long time ago, they weren't allowed to visit patients, period. Some hospitals were designed with that in mind, having outdoor corridors to patients' rooms........
    This experience may have affected my attitude, but not much. My surgeon came around with his 4 year old to remove my dressing over the reconstructed mastectomy he'd done. When little "________" saw my raw. bleeding op site, he said it like it was, "Yuck!" I thought that was funny, at the time, but now wonder how seeing such things at a tender age really affects those kids, and what would motivate a "professional" to expose them to things they might not let them see on TV................ Bad baby sitter! :innerconf
  4. by   gingerwhinger
    What about doctor who brings his kids, not toddlers but pre teens, into his consulting rooms and actually has them working (helping) while they are there and he is seeing patients, filing, entering patients test results onto computer records etc, and secretary/nursing staff are expected to supervise them. I have a huge issue with this - surely it is a massive professional misconduct and violation of privacy?
    Sorry to go off the original topic but it's sort of related.
  5. by   gentle
    Quote from gingerwhinger
    What about doctor who brings his kids, not toddlers but pre teens, into his consulting rooms and actually has them working (helping) while they are there and he is seeing patients, filing, entering patients test results onto computer records etc, and secretary/nursing staff are expected to supervise them. I have a huge issue with this - surely it is a massive professional misconduct and violation of privacy?
    Sorry to go off the original topic but it's sort of related.
    Sorry OP,
    I am breaking tos and going off topic to respond to the above post.


    I understand what you are saying. I understand why you are saying this also.

    My mom wasn't a doctor, however, she was the only person working in the laboratory of a small rural hospital. She drove from our home to the hospital for any labs needed for patients in the ER (anytime day or night).

    If I didn't go with her on call, file those papers, document the statistics or whatever else she needed, I wouldn't have been able to spend time with her.

    I understand what everyone is saying about privacy. I also understand what it is like to actually live on the other side--as the child. I cherish those days, I spent with my mother. I am only now able to pull from her character and work ethic.

    The focus is not to jeopardize anyone's privacy etc. The focus of the parent is to build a relationship with their child and still serve others.

    If you are the patient and not comfortable with a child being present, then please ask the parent to have their child leave the room.

    If you are the nurse and you know a patient isn't comfortable with a child's presence, then let the practitioner know before they take their child into the room with them. Don't offer to babysit, keep the child occupied, or anything else, just go on about your business seeing your next patient. The parent and child should already be having discussions about correct behaviors, and what to do while waiting.

    If the above discussions haven't taken place or aren't understood by the child, then this is the time to either confront the parent, or notify your supervisor, or both.

    In the end, this particular topic becomes a very thorny matter, indeed. Because, privacy is being jeopardized for family-time; and family-time is being jeopardized for privacy. Violation of privacy yes. Massive professional misconduct, doubtful.

    Definitely, no easy answers. Case-by case, compromise is necessary.

    Again my apologies to the OP.
  6. by   gingerwhinger
    Quote from gentle
    Sorry OP,
    I am breaking tos and going off topic to respond to the above post.


    I understand what you are saying. I understand why you are saying this also.

    My mom wasn't a doctor, however, she was the only person working in the laboratory of a small rural hospital. She drove from our home to the hospital for any labs needed for patients in the ER (anytime day or night).

    If I didn't go with her on call, file those papers, document the statistics or whatever else she needed, I wouldn't have been able to spend time with her.

    I understand what everyone is saying about privacy. I also understand what it is like to actually live on the other side--as the child. I cherish those days, I spent with my mother. I am only now able to pull from her character and work ethic.

    The focus is not to jeopardize anyone's privacy etc. The focus of the parent is to build a relationship with their child and still serve others.

    If you are the patient and not comfortable with a child being present, then please ask the parent to have their child leave the room.

    If you are the nurse and you know a patient isn't comfortable with a child's presence, then let the practitioner know before they take their child into the room with them. Don't offer to babysit, keep the child occupied, or anything else, just go on about your business seeing your next patient. The parent and child should already be having discussions about correct behaviors, and what to do while waiting.

    If the above discussions haven't taken place or aren't understood by the child, then this is the time to either confront the parent, or notify your supervisor, or both.

    In the end, this particular topic becomes a very thorny matter, indeed. Because, privacy is being jeopardized for family-time; and family-time is being jeopardized for privacy. Violation of privacy yes. Massive professional misconduct, doubtful.

    Definitely, no easy answers. Case-by case, compromise is necessary.

    Again my apologies to the OP.
    Yea - apologies to the OP.

    In reply to the above post I resepct your views and where you are coming from re - your experience. However, we will have to agree to differ. I feel unable to give detailed background information on my experience here but can say the patient details were being used in research without consent and the children were being paid to do it to save time - in quite a sensitive speciality. Like you say - may be a case by case issue. As a reserach co-ordinator - I have been advised that I would be liable for breach of ethics. Of course - as a nurse among this - I would expect to face a disciplinary hearing or lose my license - doubt the doctor would - maybe that's cynical and maybe I'm not as tolerant as everyone else here - like I say - agree to differ is the best thing - and thanks for your viewpoint.
  7. by   gentle
    Quote from gingerwhinger
    Yea - apologies to the OP.

    In reply to the above post I resepct your views and where you are coming from re - your experience. However, we will have to agree to differ. I feel unable to give detailed background information on my experience here but can say the patient details were being used in research without consent and the children were being paid to do it to save time - in quite a sensitive speciality. Like you say - may be a case by case issue. As a reserach co-ordinator - I have been advised that I would be liable for breach of ethics. Of course - as a nurse among this - I would expect to face a disciplinary hearing or lose my license - doubt the doctor would - maybe that's cynical and maybe I'm not as tolerant as everyone else here - like I say - agree to differ is the best thing - and thanks for your viewpoint.

    Ahhh, I see .

    Your second post provides much more information to support your previous statements.
  8. by   BellaCerraRN
    It's a violation of HIPPA thus a violation of the law, pure and simple. No excuses IMNSHO for this Doctors lack of ethics. Get a babysitter and hire an assistant if you need help with the paperwork.
  9. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from BellaCerraRN
    It's a violation of HIPPA thus a violation of the law, pure and simple. No excuses IMNSHO for this Doctors lack of ethics. Get a babysitter and hire an assistant if you need help with the paperwork.
    Actually, HIPPA is a "Crock". Patients sign it thinking their privacy will be preserved, but unless all the professionals working with them sign it, too, it's not only meaningless, but frankly a scam perpetrated by our government. The actual purpose of the document is buried in the small print wherein the patients really sign allowing private information to be shared with any insurance company or government agency!
    SHAME!!

    If you're disposed as I am to object to your Senators, Governor and Representatives in Congress, please join me in doing so. It's a sad day when so blatant a scheme, based on distain for Americans' intelligence, is presented as something to protect them. No wonder there is general distrust of our government!

    I never sign it, and even when it's worded as having patients agree that they've been shown that ridiculous piece of garbage, I insist on having the whole thing in my chart, with the sentence regarding the above, scratched out, and I have the physician or individual in admitting initial that. Doctors I know have stopped using it.

    Unfortunately we can't advise patients to do likewise, but I encourage everyone I know personally, to do the same as I do. Sorry to digress from kids with physician parents at the hospital...... but as you-all may notice, I'm steamed.:angryfire
  10. by   TiredMD
    Quote from lamazeteacher
    Actually, HIPPA is a "Crock". Patients sign it thinking their privacy will be preserved, but unless all the professionals working with them sign it, too, it's not only meaningless, but frankly a scam perpetrated by our government.
    You're under the impression that if you don't sign it, it doesn't apply?
  11. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from TiredMD
    You're under the impression that if you don't sign it, it doesn't apply?
    This stuff sure is enough to make one very, very tired, doctor.........

    I'm under the impression that if my medical information is given to a government or insurance agency without my knowledge and specific permission (such as the fact that I'm BRSA & BRSB+). If that results in my being unable to attain health insurance; and I have huge medical bills (damages) that aren't covered by insurance as a result of that, I will have a good legal case against the agency/doctor who released said information.

    Since most patients aren't as opposed as I am to signing a HIPPA form, it's likely the person releasing my information would be unaware that I prohibited it. However ignorance is no useful defense. If I signed it, and then became displeased with the resultant damages, I wouldn't be able to plead ignorance successfully either. That's because everyone should read anything they sign thoroughly, and be free to ammend what is unacceptable to them.

    Shortening the HIPPA forms to say the information has been given and received is so misleading and devious, as well as demeaning, as it says people aren't capable of understanding that they're signing something that could bite back at them, so self betrayal can be easier, by just removing the part that disserves them, and have them sign something saying they agree, whether or not they read it, because it was offered!

    The tax money that went into deliberating the matter, and preparing the statement is a misuse of public funds! That kind of misuse of time, as well, for something potentially harmful to taxpayers is tantamount to
    betrayal of human rights - the right of privacy for self protection against an industry (healthcare insurance) bent on profiting from the avoidance of necessary costs. Equal opportunity is the law, in all aspects of the insurance business as well as others. Those with histories of illness portending increased medical costs in the future have an equal right to insurance, as anyone else. However, that being the case, profiteering insurance companies may well provide policies that are too costly for anyone but the extremely rich, for those having diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and the litany of other diseases that could be ameliorated by timely preventive treatment.

    Remember that insurance as an idea, began with hoods demanding "protection money".............
  12. by   twotrees2
    Quote from traumaRUs
    I agree - a very poor interaction with his kids. I have to ask - what were his kids in the hospital with him making rounds anyway???
    we had a doc who did that - a surgeaon actually - his kids would twirl on the high backed chairs - whilst he made rounds - annoying us and yapping ( like we were babysitters) - one i said to hey knock it off or your gonna need sticthes when ya wap your head on the floor ( hoping the kid wouldnt tell lol ) guess what - he ended up stitching up his kids head lol. never saw them again with him.
  13. by   xviii-xxv
    arent kids supposed to be "away" or only allowed short visiting periods in the hospital?? and some areas are even prohibited... >.<

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