Rode up on first accident outside of hospital....

  1. 1
    Hey my fellow RN's! I need some advice.

    I was on my way home from my moma's house and rode up on a car accident. Medics were not on the scene yet. I pull over, get out of my car and head to the first car. The guy is on his cell phone, says he hit his head, but otherwise ok. I hear medics running hot to the scene. I asked him if he knew what happened and he said "yeah". He knew what year it was and then he tells me to check on the guy in other car.

    The other car is in the middle of the highway and traffic was stalled. I run over to the other car and bang on the window and he is also on his cell phone, he states he is not hurt and he is ok.

    So, I leave since both guys are ok, the one who hit his head was A&O, and I heard sierens.

    On the drive home, I couldnt help but think did the guy who hit his head may needed a CT? What if he had a brain bleed? Then I thought, I didnt even have any equipment in my car (only the kit the American Cross give you when you complete BLS) and even that was in my other car.

    Would you have stayed? I'm wondering if I should have stayed until help actually got on the scene, although both parties "seemed" ok.

    Now I'm beating myself up over this......
    dthfytr likes this.
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  3. 65 Comments so far...

  4. 4
    As an RN you should have stayed on the scene until the EMT's arrived.
    CJMR, canoehead, OttawaRPN, and 1 other like this.
  5. 1
    I think, since you took upon yourself the role of first responder, you should have stayed until the medics arrived.
    dthfytr likes this.
  6. 0
    Ok, thanks for telling me that.

    It was my first scene since being a RN.

    I didnt tell either guy I was an RN. I was in street clothes. No personalized tags or things of that nature.

    Now I know for future reference.

    BTW, it was a finder bender.
  7. 16
    Quote from afrocentricRN
    Ok, thanks for telling me that.

    It was my first scene since being a RN.

    I didnt tell either guy I was an RN. I was in street clothes. No personalized tags or things of that nature.

    Now I know for future reference.

    BTW, it was a finder bender.
    Another thing to keep in mind, is you always need to make sure YOU are safe on a scene like that.
    tokidoki7, mcknis, CJMR, and 13 others like this.
  8. 14
    Since you stopped, I guess you should have stayed. Personally, I wouldn't have stopped. You actually made yourself a potential third casualty by running across the highway (yes, I know traffic was "stalled" but you never know what can happen). That is what medics are for and what they are trained for. Unless you're trained to be a first responder to accident scenes, I'm not sure how much good most nurses really do. It's not like most of us have that sort of training, let alone the appropriate equipment on hand to be of much use. IMO, other than calling 911, leave the rescuing up to the pros.
    southern rn, tokidoki7, Oz2, and 11 others like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from hiddencatRN
    Another thing to keep in mind, is you always need to make sure YOU are safe on a scene like that.
    Yeah, it was raining quite hard and before I pulled over, I made sure no other incoming traffic was coming before I got out the car.

    I was quite surprised nobody else had even thought to pull over. But someone may have called 911 while driving pass.
  10. 0
    Quote from OCNRN63
    Since you stopped, I guess you should have stayed. Personally, I wouldn't have stopped. You actually made yourself a potential third casualty by running across the highway (yes, I know traffic was "stalled" but you never know what can happen). That is what medics are for and what they are trained for. Unless you're trained to be a first responder to accident scenes, I'm not sure how much good most nurses really do. It's not like most of us have that sort of training, let alone the appropriate equipment on hand to be of much use. IMO, other than calling 911, leave the rescuing up to the pros.
    I guess my thought was to make sure everyone was ok and to call 911. I actually had my phone in my hand when I approached the first car.

    I actually thought to keep driving but nobody else had stopped. Had someone else would have been there, I probably would have kept on driving.
  11. 8
    I've a long history of EMS and ER medicine. In an emergency, once you make any "overt action" to help, you're responsible to do so to the limits of your training and ability. You did it. You're not responsible for training you don't have, or supplies that aren't available. I would suggest waiting for EMS to arrive, identify yourself and report off to them. They'll probably ignore you anyway, but ***. Most people wouldn't stop, so give yourself credit for being the exception. Just FYI, the good Samaritan law is a "passive law." You can always be sued, but use the good sam law as a defense. I'd encourage all to take a first aid course. Good work. May all your orders be legible and all your patients compliant.
    tokidoki7, missdeevah, TickyRN, and 5 others like this.
  12. 4
    The problem is, if someone wasn't OK, then what? Then you would have been in the position of being a licensed caregiver at the scene. You'd have basically had your hands tied with no equipment and no one else to help you. Good Samaritan laws may have covered whatever care you may have provided, but you'd have still been in a very complicated position. What if both people had been badly injured? Would you have felt confident in your ability to triage the situation?

    These are among the many reasons why I don't stop at accidents. I'll call 911, but stop? No. I know what my limits are.
    tokidoki7, GM2RN, Thankful RN,BSN, and 1 other like this.


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