RNs with Bad Credit

  1. Are most employers doing credit checks now? What can an RN with bad credit do then?
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  2. 24 Comments

  3. by   cmo421
    I could be dead wrong, but I do not think they have a right too your credit history. They have rights to your work backround,a criminal backround check and references. Unless thing have changed, they can not even get the reason you might have left a past employer, unless you volunteer that information. A SS number does not have to be given until you have been offered and accept the position. I do not put my SS number on anything until I absolutely have to. Read the fine print and ask questions before you sign anything. I have crossed off things that I did not want someone privy to. For example when I was filling out paperwork to collect LTD from acompnay, the fine print suggested they could get financial and credit backround. I have nothing to hide, but I called them and complained and then crossed it out. I still received my benifits.
    I am sure it might be different in some states, but I bet someone out there in Nurse land will have the answers!
  4. by   jenrninmi
    To my knowledge, I've never had an employer check my credit.
  5. by   Tweety
    Quote from cmo421
    Unless thing have changed.........
    Oh yes, things have changed. Presumably there's a waiver one signs giving them access to it. But employers are now doing credit checks.

    I don't think it's widespread, but it's a growing phenomenon apparently.

    To the OP, I think it depends where you are. I know here in Tampa Bay they do criminal background checks and employment history, but not credit. I could be wrong, I haven't applied for a job in 15 years.

    Good luck.
  6. by   Quickbeam
    The last three RN friends I talked to had all had credit checks done for new employment in the last year. I just went to a seminar on employment law and I guess it is coming like a tidal wave. I just got a note that my credit score will factor in to how much I pay for car insurance. It really gives me the creeps.

    Yes, it is happening.
  7. by   classicdame
    many employers now check credit to determine if A) you are going to be someone with garnished checks they have to mess with B) You are/are not responsible C) you are not a flight risk. If your credit is bad you need to talk to one of the companies like Equifax to see what measures can remediate the situation. Good luck!
  8. by   TheCommuter
    My credit history has been checked in the pre-employment stage. Luckily, I have an excellent credit report.

    There's hope for you, because not all employers wish to invest the time and money into checking the credit history of all applicants, especially the smaller facilities. Any decent employer would realize that good people sometimes end up with bad credit due to unavoidable circumstances such as unemployment, injury, illness, divorce, or other issues.

    Good luck to you. There's light at the end of the tunnel!
  9. by   LoveMyBugs
    The hospital I just interviewed at does credit checks. When you apply online, after you are done with the application up pops the page saying that they will do a credit check and to type your in name in to signify that you are okay with it. I have okay credit and got an interview and a second interivew, so mabey they dont put that much weight on it.
  10. by   Multicollinearity
    Credit checks can reveal a wealth of information for reasons that have little to do with actual credit.

    For example, when you apply for any credit, you list your employer. This is on your credit report for years. So if someone doesn't list all actual employers on their employment app, yet the credit report shows you applied for credit and listed xyz hospital as your employer...there ya go. More information for the potential employer.

    Credit reports also list some public records and judgments. So for example, if you were involved in a lawsuit, legal issues related to that could be on your credit report.

    Your previous addresses you used for the past seven years will also be on your credit report. This is a way of verifying that you were honest (or not) on your background check information you provided separately to the potential employer.

    In addition, your credit reports list if you have used aliases when applying for credit. This is always helpful information for a potential employer.

    So there are many reasons why a potential employer may wish to see your credit report, and they don't all have to do with credit. Then of course, there are those who are under garnishment orders. No employer wants to deal with that.
  11. by   HappyMeNow
    I'm not a registered nurse yet. Hopefully I will become one in late 2010. If it's a beginning trend for credit checks right now, aren't I just completely screwed in 2 years' time?
  12. by   Multicollinearity
    I could be mistaken, but unless you have garnishments, I don't think you need to worry about it for the average staff nurse job.

    If you have a garnishment, I'd fix that now.
  13. by   All_Smiles_RN
    I have so-so credit from some hard lessons learned a few years ago. My current employer did a credit check one year ago and I got the job. I don't think this will affect the average staff nurse. By the time you are applying for an executive level position, hopefully you've had the time to rectify your credit situation.
  14. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from multicollinearity
    Credit checks can reveal a wealth of information for reasons that have little to do with actual credit.

    For example, when you apply for any credit, you list your employer. This is on your credit report for years. So if someone doesn't list all actual employers on their employment app, yet the credit report shows you applied for credit and listed xyz hospital as your employer...there ya go. More information for the potential employer.

    Credit reports also list some public records and judgments. So for example, if you were involved in a lawsuit, legal issues related to that could be on your credit report.

    Your previous addresses you used for the past seven years will also be on your credit report. This is a way of verifying that you were honest (or not) on your background check information you provided separately to the potential employer.

    In addition, your credit reports list if you have used aliases when applying for credit. This is always helpful information for a potential employer.

    So there are many reasons why a potential employer may wish to see your credit report, and they don't all have to do with credit. Then of course, there are those who are under garnishment orders. No employer wants to deal with that.
    multi, this is fascinating info.
    it certainly afforded me more insight as to the "whys" of credit checks.

    thank you!

    leslie

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