RN in Long-Term Care

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    I have a question on this pls.I am a new RN graduate and considering a Long-term care facility. In this facility, most of the nurses are LPNs( no beef with that at all), but in order not to step on toes or have mine stepped upon, I'd like to seek advice from other RNs who have worked in this system.

    How does it work?I mean, no offence intended, but I'm absolutely certain, that I may not like being delegated to by an LPN, to me, that's like a role reversal. What are your opinions, suggestions and thoughts on this pls?
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  4. 7
    I have worked LTC a lot through the years. My take on working with LPN's is that they are nurses too, and you are co workers, if they have been there longer you can learn a lot from them about your facility the residents and how things get done. And what if you get something delegated to you from an LPN.... aren't you really there for the residents? You need to be a team player no matter whom you work with.... LPN, and CNA's will be your co workers, and you will need to learn to respect them all and listen to what they have to say!
  5. 0
    As a RN you would automatically be their supervisor/in charge. You should also be orientated by a RN and not a LPN as your job roles will be completely different. However as a new graduate there may be a subtle difference in the way LPN's treat you to the other RN's at the facility as you have not had any hands on experience as a RN as of yet. However like any new job trust/respect is earned and not automatic. I am sure you will be fine however just wanted to make the above points. Good luck in your decision.
  6. 2
    Here, there is one RN or LPN per floor. RNs are NOT supervisors for LPNs, but they will have more of a scope to practice within, of course.

    Of course, this all is very dependent on where you are working (state or province).
    tattooednursie and Fiona59 like this.
  7. 1
    Quote from justiceforjoy
    Here, there is one RN or LPN per floor. RNs are NOT supervisors for LPNs, but they will have more of a scope to practice within, of course.

    Of course, this all is very dependent on where you are working (state or province).
    RN's will always be in charge over a LPN due to the scope of practice between the two roles. There is a big difference between the RN and LPN training. However ultimately RN's and LPN's should be working together as a team eh ?
    tattooednursie likes this.
  8. 2
    I think you and I have a different opinion of "in charge", unless you're assuming that the RN is the CN?

    (I'm in Canada where LPNs can work without an RN present. When I think of "in charge", I think of an RN telling the LPN what they should be doing, but here LPNs carry out their patient workload autonomously. RNs can delegate to LPNs for sure, but they're not always in charge of the LPN)
    tattooednursie and Fiona59 like this.
  9. 1
    Quote from justiceforjoy
    I think you and I have a different opinion of "in charge", unless you're assuming that the RN is the CN?

    (I'm in Canada where LPNs can work without an RN present. When I think of "in charge", I think of an RN telling the LPN what they should be doing, but here LPNs carry out their patient workload autonomously. RNs can delegate to LPNs for sure, but they're not always in charge of the LPN)

    I was assuming the RN was the CN. I worked in places where they HAD to be a RN in charge of the shift and not the RPN. I know from my experiences of working in Canada that different provinces and the difference between public and private health care deemed completely different rules and regulations.
    justiceforjoy likes this.
  10. 7
    Quote from travellingsuitcase
    As a RN you would automatically be their supervisor/in charge. You should also be orientated by a RN and not a LPN

    I have a feeling this poster has never actually worked in LTC. The chances are very high you will be oriented by a LPN as there are rarely many RN's in LTC.

    Please be cautious with this tone that RN are superior to LPNs in LTC. You are sure to meet resistance at work as well as in this forum. I have been in LTC for 23 years - 19 as LPN and 4 as RN. It takes everyone working together to get this overwhelming job done. Pulling rank is like running your head in a brick wall. I didn't like it as an LPN and I don't pull it now as an RN. Learned a long time ago that even a really good housekeeper is capable to saving a life!


    Best of luck to you
  11. 0
    Quote from Nascar nurse
    I have a feeling this poster has never actually worked in LTC. The chances are very high you will be oriented by a LPN as there are rarely many RN's in LTC.

    Please be cautious with this tone that RN are superior to LPNs in LTC. You are sure to meet resistance at work as well as in this forum. I have been in LTC for 23 years - 19 as LPN and 4 as RN. It takes everyone working together to get this overwhelming job done. Pulling rank is like running your head in a brick wall. I didn't like it as an LPN and I don't pull it now as an RN. Learned a long time ago that even a really good housekeeper is capable to saving a life!


    Best of luck to you
    I dont think that RN's are superior to RPN's at all and I agree that everyone should work together as a team as we are all there for the same reason , the patients. However I have just acknowledged that different provinces and the difference's between public and private health care have different rules and regulations.

    Maybe you should not be so quick to jump up and down and assume that I am being superior when you have nothing to validate your comments.
    Last edit by travellingsuitcase on Aug 29, '09 : Reason: missed a word
  12. 11
    Quote from Katie5
    How does it work?I mean, no offence intended, but I'm absolutely certain, that I may not like being delegated to by an LPN, to me, that's like a role reversal. What are your opinions, suggestions and thoughts on this pls?
    are you specifically worried about an lpn being cn, and delegating to you?
    what is the big deal?
    one's character means lots more than one's title.
    and so, anyone w/character, will allow you to do your job and not try to pull rank or play any other mind games.
    if he/she tries, you are bound by your scope of practice, and handle it accordingly.

    dang, if i worried about rank/title, i would have never learned the tons of stuff the nsg assts taught me over the years.
    i could go on and on about who has taught me what over the course of my lifetime...
    and looking back, i would have to say it was the 'little guy' who showed me the way, time and time again.

    life is too darned short to be sweating the small stuff.
    take pride in what you've accomplished, yet treat everyone equally and respectfully.

    seriously katie, let it go.
    let your conscience guide you - and not your ego.
    ideally all will be working cohesively for the good of the pts.
    if it doesn't work out, i'm pretty certain it will have little to do w/lpn vs rn.
    more likely, will have to do with the person behind the title.
    and that's who you'd have to confront - the person, not the title.

    wishing you the very best.

    leslie


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