RN career oppurtunities

  1. Sorry for the lack of knowledge about nursing first of all. I have a couple of questions.

    1. You are able to become a RN w/o having a bachelors degree?
    2. BSN is the degree you go for after you become an RN?

    I am deciding on applying for 1 year accelerated programs to become an RN. I know there are alot of career oppurtunties out there. I want to continue my education after i recieve my first degree, and I have been looking at the CRNA route. What other roads can I walk with a RN/BSN status, that will pay well? I believe RN/BSN people are paid under 30?

    Sorry again if my questions sound a little stupid, I just recently started researching this route.
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   puresass
    you can get your RN either with an associates degree in nursing (ASN) or a bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN). from what i understand (& anyone else correct me if i'm wrong), most accelerated programs are for people with a bachelor's degree in a field other than nursing that go for one year to get their BSN. the vast majority of CRNA programs require a BSN & at least one year of critical care experience.
  4. by   TheCommuter
    Yes, you can become an RN without a bachelor's degree. In fact, 60 percent of all RNs have associate's degrees. There are other RNs who attended three-year programs and received a diploma. The BSN, however, will open up advancement opportunities in management or research.

    The three major points of entry for the RN are either associate's degree, diploma, or bachelor's of science.
  5. by   IcanHealYou
    Ah ok that clears it up, thank you. I would still like to know what higher education I can seek with a BSN that will make me decent pay as well.
  6. by   TheCommuter
    I know someone who has a BSN and a MBA and she has always earned excellent money.
  7. by   Blee O'Myacin
    Quote from IcanHealYou
    . What other roads can I walk with a RN/BSN status, that will pay well? I believe RN/BSN people are paid under 30?
    Sorry again if my questions sound a little stupid, I just recently started researching this route.
    So do you want to be a nurse? There are more options than bedside hospital nursing, but IMHO, nothing beats it to build experience. Usually, case managers, nurse researchers and public health nurses have bedside experience. As for salary, I live on the east coast, midatlantic region, and new grads (with either an associates degree, BSN or diploma) are making roughly $27/hour to start. 27*36 hours per week = $972 * 52 = 50,544. Most institutions offer tuition reimbursement and/or student loan forgiveness in exchange for a specific, contracted time.

    Good luck!

    Blee

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