RIP - Rosie the Riveter!

  1. inspirational-quotes-for-
  2. She wasn't a nurse but she was recognized in every household across these United States and exemplified the vital roles fulfilled by women in keeping this country "up and running!" Including the 59,000 nurses in the Army Nurse Corp during WW II.
    Last edit by Joe V on Jan 31
    •  
  3. 12 Comments

  4. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    I'm going to try to do this justice. When I see a picture of Rosie the Riveter or anybody from the greatest generation I immediately think of the immense debt that everybody alive owes them today. Nursing is my second career. My first university education centered around pre-law studies which is basically political science & history courses at the University of Texas. We had a million such courses to choose from and you could a strong argument that I basically majored in WWII studies. I have been in awe of this generation since my earliest memories as both my parents were part of it.

    It is no exaggeration to say that without Rosie's (and the millions of American women) contribution to the War effort that this would be a different and much darker world. For example, if you are reading this and are anything but "pure Aryan" (a nonsensical race that the Nazi's basically made up) you probably never would have been born. The Empire of Japan had very similar ideas about genocide. Simply put, it was the "good guys versus the bad guys" for a winner take all gamble with a very uncertain outcome. In 1941 and 1942 the Germans and the Japanese were winning. The only way to beat them was to man and equip a better led and supplied armed force. Millions of Rosie's stepped to the plate and took over labor's role in American industry. These women did so at a time when their sons, husbands and just about every other male acquaintance was serving in the war effort. Many of these women went to work daily not knowing if they would ever see those who they loved so much again and in fact so many did not as their men were dying by the thousands. My Mom, all my Aunts and both my Grandmothers were, I'm very proud to say, Rosie's of another name working so the men they sent to the distant corners of the world would have a chance against the forces of pure evil. The experiences of my family were not unique.

    The women who served in the Armed Forces did so with every bit of distinction as their brothers in arms. When the Japanese took the Philippines in a surprise attack they pummeled the unprepared US Army into surrender. Much has been made of the tribulations of the soldiers who were subject to the Bataan Death March and subsequent imprisonment under horrendous and inhuman conditions. Very little is said about the women service members who were there. While the Army continued the fight against the Japanese US Army Nurses worked tirelessly to save as many soldiers as they could. In fact after the War the few surviving members of the Bataan Death March dubbed them the "Angels of Corregidor". Arguably, they made even a larger contribution after the American surrender. The American Nurses were sent to a prison camp outside of Manila where for the next four years they helped keep hundreds of American civilian prisoners alive. Once again their gallant service was not unique. Women were fighting and dying worldwide and without them the War's not won.

    Rest In Peace Rosie. The world owes you a debt that has never been and cannot be repaid
    Last edit by SpankedInPittsburgh on Jan 26
  5. by   OldDude
    BRAVO! BRAVO! AND BRAVO! Can't add a thing to this. My dad service in the Pacific for 2 years while my mom and my dad's mom worked in the effort to generate war supplies. Truly, remarkable generation. Thank you,Spanked, for the excellent historical excerpt and for sharing your family history.
  6. by   Hygiene Queen
    My grandmother was a welder and she was very proud of her contribution and the skills she acquired. She was a hard worker and tough stuff. Between enduring The Great Depression and WWII, how could she not be? I miss her and am proud of what she did.

    Anyway, RIP Rosie!
  7. by   ItsThatJenGirl
    Quote from SpankedInPittsburgh
    I'm going to try to do this justice. When I see a picture of Rosie the Riveter or anybody from the greatest generation I immediately think of the immense debt that everybody alive owes them today. Nursing is my second career. My first university education centered around pre-law studies which is basically political science & history courses at the University of Texas. We had a million such courses to choose from and you could a strong argument that I basically majored in WWII studies. I have been in awe of this generation since my earliest memories as both my parents were part of it.

    It is no exaggeration to say that without Rosie's (and the millions of American women) contribution to the War effort that this would be a different and much darker world. For example, if you are reading this and are anything but "pure Aryan" (a nonsensical race that the Nazi's basically made up) you probably never would have been born. The Empire of Japan had very similar ideas about genocide. Simply put, it was the "good guys versus the bad guys" for a winner take all gamble with a very uncertain outcome. In 1941 and 1942 the Germans and the Japanese were winning. The only way to beat them was to man and equip a better led and supplied armed force. Millions of Rosie's stepped to the plate and took over labor's role in American industry. These women did so at a time when their sons, husbands and just about every other male acquaintance was serving in the war effort. Many of these women went to work daily not knowing if they would ever see those who they loved so much again and in fact so many did not as their men were dying by the thousands. My Mom, all my Aunts and both my Grandmothers were, I'm very proud to say, Rosie's of another name working so the men they sent to the distant corners of the world would have a chance against the forces of pure evil. The experiences of my family were not unique.

    The women who served in the Armed Forces did so with every bit of distinction as their brothers in arms. When the Japanese took the Philippines in a surprise attack they pummeled the unprepared US Army into surrender. Much has been made of the tribulations of the soldiers who were subject to the Bataan Death March and subsequent imprisonment under horrendous and inhuman conditions. Very little is said about the women service members who were there. While the Army continued the fight against the Japanese US Army Nurses worked tirelessly to save as many soldiers as they could. In fact after the War the few surviving members of the Bataan Death March dubbed them the "Angels of Corregidor". Arguably, they made even a larger contribution after the American surrender. The American Nurses were sent to a prison camp outside of Manila where for the next four years they helped keep hundreds of American civilian prisoners alive. Once again their gallant service was not unique. Women were fighting and dying worldwide and without them the War's not won.

    Rest In Peace Rosie. The world owes you a debt that has never been and cannot be repaid
    I don't know if its the exhaustion of nursing school or what, but this made me tear up. What a lovely post.
  8. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    Thank Rosie!!! I just sayin what was
  9. by   Davey Do
    Thank you Old Dude, Spanked, and company.

    The pain, trials, and tribulations basically the generation before mine/ours had to deal with were phenomenal and beyond my comprehension. I sincerely appreciate the sacrifices they made.

    Thanks again, Old Dude, for calling attention to Rosie's passing.

    Godspeed!
  10. by   sirI
    Growing up, I wasn't at all familiar with Rosie's image.

    My father never talked about "the war". I knew he received the Purple Heart for wounds received during WWII while in the Navy.

    And, that was about it.

    After 911, one day he suddenly opened up to me ... just me ... and everything spilled out.

    I was in awe, deeply moved, speechless ...

    God bless you, Rosie.

    I hope we NEVER forget you.
  11. by   Silver_Rik
    My grandmother worked during the War in a parachute factory. I've visited the location, it's an art gallery now. Airborne soldiers and air crews literally put their lives in her hands. Later in life, in the 1960's, she became an LPN and worked for over 20 years at the predecessor location to the same state mental health facility where I work now. She retired from nursing in the 80's and passed away just days after 9-11-2001
  12. by   OldDude
    Quote from Silver_Rik
    My grandmother worked during the War in a parachute factory. I've visited the location, it's an art gallery now. Airborne soldiers and air crews literally put their lives in her hands. Later in life, in the 1960's, she became an LPN and worked for over 20 years at the predecessor location to the same state mental health facility where I work now. She retired from nursing in the 80's and passed away just days after 9-11-2001
    See, this is what I'm talking about! This is just one recollection of an awesome, patriotic, woman stepping up to her country's needs and selflessly contributing to the collective "good." There are literally millions of similar heroes that showed up and churned out what was needed to facilitate victory over evil. Amazing!
  13. by   Irish_Mist
    This reminds me of the few occasions I have taken care of WW2 veterans. Such a privilege and honor.
  14. by   Daisy4RN
    Old dude, thanks so much for this remembrance. I remember my grandparents stories of the war and how those at home made many sacrifices as well as the soldiers. My grandma kept her war ration books with unused stamps because "we only used what needed",. We could all learn a little from this great generation personaly and as a country.
  15. by   LibraSunCNM
    Interesting story about how the real "Rosie" was mis-identified until only a few years ago:

    The Hunt for Naomi Parker Fraley, the Real Rosie the Riveter | Time

    My grandpa fought in WWII and I'll always have a soft spot for that generation.

close