Retire by 30, thanks nursing! - page 6

Ok check this out, i have a plan to retire by the age of 30: I'm 21 yrs old and about to graduate a ADN program i will spend 1 year gaining experience in the ICU, then i will spend the next 8... Read More

  1. by   Skeletor
    Quote from chuckc
    weathered battleaxe" that is new to nursing.
    Weathered so soon? I'll remain optimistic and hope things look brighter for you in the near future
  2. by   chuckc
    Quote from StayinOnTheGrind
    Weathered so soon? I'll remain optimistic and hope things look brighter for you in the near future
    Nice backhand, LOL.:smiley_ab
  3. by   Skeletor
    Quote from chuckc
    Nice backhand, LOL.:smiley_ab
    We have to laugh sometime or we'll all end up on Zoloft
  4. by   madwife2002
    I know you all mean well and consider some of the sarcasum to be funny but please stay on track and leave each other alone.
  5. by   Jo Dirt
    I know our dreams and plans have a lot of grandeur when we are young.

    If a person was disciplined to the point of living on beenie weenies, riding a bicycle, shopping at yard sales, not going on vacations, etc.. and they could put away a thousand dollars a week in ten years they could accumulate a million dollars investing in mutual funds and that would be a good little chunk of change.
    It[s a good plan but so much changes in your twenties and life happens.
  6. by   agent66
    Quote from cardiacRN2006
    When you know what it's like to actually be a nurse and pull 13 hour shifts in the ICU, with everybody pulling you each and every direction, then you can let me know if you will feel like a safe practitioner working 5 12 hour shifts a week for the next 8 years straight.

    Until then, you have no idea of what it's like and can not comment on how attention to detail will prevent you from making mistakes-because you have no clue.


    Well said cardiac!!! That 60 hour workweek for 8 years sounds like the fast track to burnout by 30, not retirement. You are only planning on 2days off a week? Plan on one of those for sleeping because you are going to be exhausted. Think you will feel like housework etc on that one extra day off?? Not likely, but if you can, sure sounds like a fun day off!! If you figured a family into that equation anywhere, I can tell you they will not appreciate those hours. And on the patient side of your workweek, I don't think I would want to be under your care on that 5th shift. Fatigue does show, not only in your appearance and demeanour but also in your care!
  7. by   lotus32
    Why are you selling yourself short? You're going to an RN shortly. Are you going back to school for your BSN,MSN, PhD? Maybe you don't have to work like a slave for 9 years to achieve your goals and miss out on the best time of your life. There are too many lucative opportunities out there. Get a few years experience then get a legal nurse certificate and you can make $100-150/hr. You're 21, get a job, save your money wisely, continue your education and I guarantee you that your quality of life will be a whole lot better. If you're in Nursing just for the money, working all of those hours is going to make you very bitter. You have to love what you're doing to make a sacrifice of that proportion. Believe me, the money will always be there.

    :spin:steph
  8. by   mercyteapot
    You'd have to invest that $669,000 very, very well indeed if you don't ever want to work again. It sounds like a lot of money, but when you're looking at making last 50 or so years, well.... good luck.
  9. by   redsoxbrad
    Thanks for the laughs, what a great post, to be 21 again! Good luck with the plan but a little thing like LIFE might get in the way.
  10. by   llg
    Quote from redsoxbrad
    Thanks for the laughs, what a great post, to be 21 again! Good luck with the plan but a little thing like LIFE might get in the way.
    ... and taxes !
  11. by   treysdaddy08
    Honestly if you're 21 and want to be a travel nurse, I would suggest going for your BSN and going into the military at age 23. After 20 years you retire with 50% of your income, up to 75% at 30 years. So you can realistically retire at age 43. If you make Lt. Colonel (O-5, which, as far as I know, is very realistic), you will be making (according to 2008 scale, which absolutely will go up each year) 7409/month. 1/2 of that is approx 3700/month, or 43000 a year. You can also put part of your paycheck (say, 10%) in a 401k that the military offers. If you put an average of 500/month, or 6k a year, at 20 years and not including interest you'd have 120k in a retirement fun. So you are then guaranteed 43000 a year before taxes, and have 120k in a retirement fun, which you can then use, once you're out, to buy (or put a fantastic down payment) on a house. You also get the medical, dental, & vision, guaranteed job, and aren't required to work 60+ hours a week. It's a more realistic goal, imo.
  12. by   treysdaddy08
    Quote from James Huffman
    Wow, I can hardly live with this kind of optimism.

    Lawsuits? Nurses worry incessantly about lawsuits, while hardly any nurses are ever sued. It's very easy to deal with, if someone is that worried: buy some liability insurance (for almost everyone reading this, less than $100 a year) and forget about it.

    Mistakes? Everyone makes them. Even those who work 8 hours a week. Or whatever. The rule is be the best nurse you can be, do the best you can be, and, again, don't worry about it.

    In it for the money? Who cares? I'd far rather see someone in it for the money, than the crusading do-gooders who are there "to help people." Those "in it for the money" are usually competent, qualified, organized nurses who don't operate with the illusion that nursing is some kind of religious order.

    Just for the record, I routinely work 60 hours a week. I'm self-employed and I love what I do. People who are chronically exhausted aren't usually over-worked -- their problem is that they don't like what they do and don't have a goal. Get a goal, get a plan and aim for it. You might not hit it -- that's the risk you take with a goal -- but you'll go a lot further than someone who's just putzing along.
    Quote from the head of the OB department in a town of about 18k people

    "If you work here for 5 years and haven't been subpeoned yet, you're in the vast minority".

    My friend has been working there 7 years and has been to court for 3 different cases.
  13. by   James Huffman
    Quote from kmcnelly
    Quote from the head of the OB department in a town of about 18k people

    "If you work here for 5 years and haven't been subpeoned yet, you're in the vast minority".

    My friend has been working there 7 years and has been to court for 3 different cases.
    Has your friend ever been sued?

    I'm not talking about being brought in as a witness in someone else's (say, a physician) suit. I'm talking about a nurse being sued. It happens. But about as often as people get hit by lightning. So if a nurse is terrified of being sued, buy the liability insurance. Either way, it's hardly worth worrying about.

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