Responses Needed for A Nursing Theory

  1. Hello everyone.

    As part of my major end of the term project for my class Theoretical Foundations in Nursing (Nrs 510), I am looking at a nursing theory in detail and providing an analysis. Part of the analysis involves describing the theory to both practicing nurses and a layperson, and recording feedback. So, I've chosen to outline the theory here and gather your responses to it. The responses need not be organized or formal; just anything, such as if it made sense to you, if you're familiar with it, do you use it, do you like it, etc.

    The theorist I am working on is Ida Jean Orlando and her Nursing Process Theory. I chose this theory because I found it intriquing that she wrote her theory solely on patient-nurse observations. None of her works include a bibliography, because she worked off of no one and all is her original thought.

    Orlando's theory was first really published in the early 1960's. Initially her work was entitled "The Dynamic Nurse-Patient Relationship" and has since been renamed "Nursing Process Theory."

    Some major assumptions of her theory are:
    1. Professional nursing has a distinct function and product (outcome). She believes it is this element that will make nursing a profession, that will enable nursing to have a unique knowledgebase that is measurable and justifyable. This function must remain constant despite pt age, gender, dx, etc.

    2. Nursing is a distinct entity separate from other professions.

    3. There is a difference b/t lay and professional nursing.

    4. Nursing is aligned and in concert with medicine.

    Orlando believed that inadequate patient care was caused by the profession's lack of a clearly articulated nursing function. According to Orlando, professional authority is derived from the profession's distinct function; therefore, without this distinctiveness nursing practice cannot be autonomous because it lacks authority.

    Initial responses?
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   l.rae
    Makes total sense to me, and l am surprised this was first conjectured tin the 60's and is still SO relavent today.....so HAVE we really progressed that much as a profession?....appeares not!..yes we have progressed dramatically in responsibility and knowlege base and technology...so WHY are we still stuck in the 60's re our reputation as a profession?...Good luck Susy.....this is profound material imho.......LR
  4. by   SharonH, RN
    Originally posted by Susy K
    Hello everyone.

    As part of my major end of the term project for my class Theoretical Foundations in Nursing (Nrs 510), I am looking at a nursing theory in detail and providing an analysis. Part of the analysis involves describing the theory to both practicing nurses and a layperson, and recording feedback. So, I've chosen to outline the theory here and gather your responses to it. The responses need not be organized or formal; just anything, such as if it made sense to you, if you're familiar with it, do you use it, do you like it, etc.

    The theorist I am working on is Ida Jean Orlando and her Nursing Process Theory. I chose this theory because I found it intriquing that she wrote her theory solely on patient-nurse observations. None of her works include a bibliography, because she worked off of no one and all is her original thought.

    Orlando's theory was first really published in the early 1960's. Initially her work was entitled "The Dynamic Nurse-Patient Relationship" and has since been renamed "Nursing Process Theory."

    Some major assumptions of her theory are:
    1. Professional nursing has a distinct function and product (outcome). She believes it is this element that will make nursing a profession, that will enable nursing to have a unique knowledgebase that is measurable and justifyable. This function must remain constant despite pt age, gender, dx, etc.

    2. Nursing is a distinct entity separate from other professions.

    3. There is a difference b/t lay and professional nursing.

    4. Nursing is aligned and in concert with medicine.

    Orlando believed that inadequate patient care was caused by the profession's lack of a clearly articulated nursing function. According to Orlando, professional authority is derived from the profession's distinct function; therefore, without this distinctiveness nursing practice cannot be autonomous because it lacks authority.

    Initial responses?

    That is fascinating and as far as I'm concerned, it is THE basis for professional nursing. Unfortunately, I have found that many practicing nurses do not consider themselves professional nurses within their own knowledge base and instead see themselves merely as taskmasters. If more nurses understood that they had a distinct contribution to patient care beyond merely carrying out physician orders, I do believe that there would be improved patient care and more professional autonomy and respect.
  5. by   hoolahan
    Originally posted by Susy K

    Some major assumptions of her theory are:
    1. Professional nursing has a distinct function and product (outcome). She believes it is this element that will make nursing a profession, that will enable nursing to have a unique knowledgebase that is measurable and justifyable. This function must remain constant despite pt age, gender, dx, etc.


    I think this is still the ideal we are all striving for, but not necessarily certain we've acheived it, esp in the eyes of John q public. I do agree with this idea.

    2. Nursing is a distinct entity separate from other professions.
    I think so, but not sure again the public thinks so. As far as different from teachers? Plumbers? yes. But about other medical professions, that is a gray area. ie is a CRNA a distinct and diff profession from a med/surg RN, or a NP? I think with all the unlicensed assitive personell, it is becoming harder and harder for the public to distinguish that we are a seperate medical profession.
    3. There is a difference b/t lay and professional nursing.

    Yes, legally this is true. But I am not sure I understand what a lay nurse would be?? My M-I-L was a "baby nurse" in the late 40's, basicall she did OTJ training to learn how to feed, bathe, give inj, sterilize bottles, etc and worked in NY foundling hosp for orphans. No real scientific theory was stressed. Not sure there is anything like this now. ??

    4. Nursing is aligned and in concert with medicine.

    I think this is true, no questions.

    Orlando believed that inadequate patient care was caused by the profession's lack of a clearly articulated nursing function.

    Not sure I agree with this, seems more like inadequate care is due to poor staffing, or lack of knowledge by coporate entities as to the clearly articulated function of nursing.

    According to Orlando, professional authority is derived from the profession's distinct function; therefore, without this distinctiveness nursing practice cannot be autonomous because it lacks authority.
    Absolutely. But the means for establishing this via nursing diagnosis is an ideal that can't be acheived when not given the appropriate staffing ratios, and the time req'd to fully develop how to put this into practice. Instead care plans and nsg dx are seen as a waste of time, and not taken seriously. Check off careplans, while convenient and necessary in the real world, have replaced the individuality needed to really demonstrate our science in action.
  6. by   Q.
    Bumping.

    More responses would be great.

    I'll try to pull out more info on Orlando's theory to pull some reactions out of you.
  7. by   WashYaHands
    I think her theory is very applicable and adequate for nursing practice. The Nursing Process Theory is exactly what nurses do in practice. If we put theory aside and look at nursing education, one of the first things learned in school is the nursing process (assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, and evaluation) based on patient needs and meeting those needs. Off shoots of this include SOAP, SOAPIE, PIE, etc. charting. Some may argue that this process is not unique to nursing as other professions use this method. But, given the fact that Orlando developed this theory in 1958 and published it in 1961, it is reasonable to argue that the process is unique to nursing and other professions borrowed from nursing. This is what makes nursing a distinct profession. Also, I like her assumption that, "nursing has been historically aligned with medicine and continues to have a close relationship with medicine, nursing and the practice of medicine are clearly separate professions." I understand this to mean that our knowledge base includes science and art (i.e. a distinct function and product). Looking at the recent research article in JAMA, which found that a reasonable nurse to patient ratio resulted in better patient outcomes, I can see the application of this theory as relevant, logical, and practical to nursing. I will add that if we as nurses do not consider the patient's perception of what they need and simply make our own assumptions as to what a patient needs, we fall short of the true value of this theory.

    Linda
  8. by   Q.
    I know this wasn't the most "hot" thread of the board, but I appreciate your responses. Linda, I wasn't aware you were in grad school. Jeez, had I known that I could've vented to you about all this reading and paper writing crap....

    Hang in there.
  9. by   WashYaHands
    Feel free to vent anytime. Grad school is the worst fun I've ever had You hang in there too.

    Linda
  10. by   dj72
    Hello evryone can you help me anwer my assignment.....What is the relevance of Myra Estrin levine to the ill person in the health care setting and to the well person in health promotion?
  11. by   Valerie Salva
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    That is fascinating and as far as I'm concerned, it is THE basis for professional nursing. Unfortunately, I have found that many practicing nurses do not consider themselves professional nurses within their own knowledge base and instead see themselves merely as taskmasters. If more nurses understood that they had a distinct contribution to patient care beyond merely carrying out physician orders, I do believe that there would be improved patient care and more professional autonomy and respect.
    I think nurses understand that very well. It is docs, mgrs, and admins who don't understand it.

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