resignation letter

  1. Hi friends,
    I am typing up a resignation letter, (got a much better paying job), and am wondering if it is necessary to put a reason you are resigning. Somehow, I feel it would be polite to give a reason.

    This is what I put:
    I have enjoyed working at________ , but unfortunately my financial status has changed and I require a job making more money.

    WHat do you all think? Is a reason necessary or should I put no reason? The real reason is way more complicated than this which I plan to divulge at an exit interview.
    TIA,
    Hoozdo
    PS - leaving this job after 10 months of being a new grad. Time for greener pastures
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   Ann RN
    Quote from Hoozdo
    Hi friends,
    I am typing up a resignation letter, (got a much better paying job), and am wondering if it is necessary to put a reason you are resigning. Somehow, I feel it would be polite to give a reason.

    This is what I put:
    I have enjoyed working at________ , but unfortunately my financial status has changed and I require a job making more money.

    WHat do you all think? Is a reason necessary or should I put no reason? The real reason is way more complicated than this which I plan to divulge at an exit interview.
    TIA,
    Hoozdo
    PS - leaving this job after 10 months of being a new grad. Time for greener pastures
    As a new grad, this hospital has invested a lot of time and money in you. I am sure you had a lengthy orientation. Do not be surprised if they seem angry. I would keep your letter as professional as possible. You never know when you may need them again. Keep your contacts happy. And remember - any hospital you interview at may look unfavorably at the fact that you left your first job after only 10 months.
  4. by   Mulan
    Are you joking?
  5. by   Hoozdo
    Quote from Mulan
    Are you joking?
    Ummmmmm........no. Why do you ask?
  6. by   MultipurposeRN
    My most recent resignation letter had the reason, that personal and work responsibilities had increased and I felt it best to cut back to just one job, I enjoyed my experience at X hospital and the people I worked with and for, blah, blah. I was quitting a prn job, not my primary.
    There should be a more tactful way to put your reason for resigning instead of just saying, hey, they're offering more money so I'm out the door. You might say you found a position that offered unique opportunities for personal growth or something like that. Anyhow, good luck w/ your new job!
  7. by   Hoozdo
    Quote from Ann RN
    As a new grad, this hospital has invested a lot of time and money in you. I am sure you had a lengthy orientation. Do not be surprised if they seem angry. I would keep your letter as professional as possible. You never know when you may need them again. Keep your contacts happy. And remember - any hospital you interview at may look unfavorably at the fact that you left your first job after only 10 months.
    I am the third nurse that has left in two weeks, gee, you think they will be angry I have followed your advice and kept my letter professional. I already have a new position so I don't have to worry about my resume looking bad after working 10 months at my job. I think this employer can afford to waste the money they did training me.....they waste it every day in foreign countries.
    Thanks for the input
  8. by   DeLana_RN
    Just remember this, never burn any bridges. Regardless of why you are leaving, it's best to keep it as professional as possible and avoid any negatives (i.e., implying that they're not paying you enough). You never know when you will need your current manager as a reference!

    So I would focus on the positives (I have learned so much; thank you for ...) and, if you want to give a reason at all, put something positive and/or vague.

    DeLana

    BTW, 10 months in a unit is not unusual for new grad; I stayed in my PCU job for 11 months.
  9. by   mekrn
    I think its pretty unprofessional to make reference to your personal financial situation, or needing to make more money. Just thank them for the opportunity they have provided you, but you have decided to pursue other opportunities.

    Be very careful that this new position is what you want, because that 10 month thing is a huge red flag, and another short stint somewhere could really hurt you.

    Good luck.
  10. by   Mulan
    Quote from Hoozdo
    Ummmmmm........no. Why do you ask?
    I wouldn't say something like that, I'd come up with something that has a positive spin to it.

    Actually you don't have to give a reason, you could say I'm resigning as of such and such date, then go on to say I have enjoyed working at ........, and have gained valuable experience, etc. Something that sounds good.
  11. by   augigi
    I wouldn't give any reason. I'd say "please accept my resignation from the position of xxxx, effective from xxxxx".
  12. by   BSNtobe2009
    I agree with the others, you don't need to state a reason.

    Never state you are leaving a job for more money, they could interally make you ineligible for rehire if you state that as a reason.
  13. by   P_RN
    Mine was "After ______ good years (months in your case) I must submit my resignation. The last day I will be available to work is _____, ______ ______.

    Sincerely,

    ______"

    Don't let them guilt you into saying you need to work out a time sheet, pay period etc. Stick to the parameters of your letter. And NEVER, never, never burn your bridges.
    You might have to deal with these people in the future.
  14. by   gr8rnpjt
    Keep it short and impersonal. No reason to mention money. You never know, you may find yourself wanting to go back to this job 10 years from now, who knows? So to put anything negative in the letter will definitely be kept in your permanent record and reviewed again if circumstances change.

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