Residents

  1. Can a person graduate from school with a medical degree and immediately hang out his shingle as a physician? OR must all med school grads serve a residency first? Is that residency always in a hospital? Is the residency for at least 4 years starting with year 1 as an intern?
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   fergus51
    Not that I knew of. Even GPs have to do a residency with a family practice.
    Last edit by fergus51 on May 27, '04
  4. by   tiredfeetED
    while talking with one of the ER docs about which doc to follow up with for my niece ...they ran across one doc in the phone book that works with other pulmonologist (sp) and they know for a fact that he completed one year of internal residency then spent some time with a family practice then went on his own...so he is not board certified in anything but still is with a group of MD's.. So i guess you can.
  5. by   EmeraldNYL
    After graduating med school, all physicians must complete a residency. The length of the residency can vary from 3-8 years, depending on what they are going into. Generally, internal medicine residents spend one year doing an internship, rotating to all of the different medical floors in the hospital. Then they spend a year rotating as a second year resident and supervise interns. After that, they can choose to specialize even further and do a fellowship in cardiology, anesthesia, pulmonology, etc... I assume that surgical residencies work the same way (I work on a medical floor so that's what I'm most familiar with). Being board certified means you pass a test in your speciality-- you can practice medicine without being "board certified", but not without completing a residency.
  6. by   traumaRUs
    I know that in Illinois - all MDs don't have to complete a residency, however, it makes insurance reimbursement difficult. At our university-teaching hospital, our ER residency is 3 years with the first year considered as internship.
  7. by   fairyprincess2003
    Yes
    Med students earn their MD or DO, complete a one year internship, then go on into residency (varies in length from 3-7 years usually) Residency placements being obtained through med school grades, board scores, etc
  8. by   suzanne4
    According to the law, once a doctor has completed an internship, he is licensed to hang out a shingle saying doctor of whatever. Doesn't mean that he can get reimbursed by insurance companies, etc., but it is legal. There are many GPs out there, that only did an internship, especially the "old-timers". Things are changing now into areas of specialization, but the old laws are still on the books.

    Example, you will find docs on the reservations doing a payback for their medical training to the government after their internship. Then going back to do a residency afterwards. This is still going on................
  9. by   adidas99
    Quote from traumaRUs
    I know that in Illinois - all MDs don't have to complete a residency, however, it makes insurance reimbursement difficult. At our university-teaching hospital, our ER residency is 3 years with the first year considered as internship.
    .....
    Last edit by adidas99 on Jan 29, '07
  10. by   suzanne4
    Once you complete an internship you can hang out a shingle that says you are a physician and surgeon. At that point you can become a licensed physician and get your own DEA number. You may have problems getting insurance reimbursments but not all clinics even accept those. Depends on where you are working. Some small towns, rural, go on a cash basis only for their clinic fees.

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