Was reprimanded and told to resign. Advice or thoughts would be appreciated. - page 5

by nurse20011 13,812 Views | 55 Comments

Hi there, I work on a general medical/surgical floor and had an incident come up the other day. I was given a large patient load without a nurse tech for help. Usually on our unit we have a tech assigned to a nurse if that... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from Wave Watcher
    1st rule: protect yourself and protect your license! I am a firm believer that a patient has to take some responsibility.....who the heck sits in a hospital bed for 1 hr with chest pain and doesn't push a call button!?? Patients will push that dang button for everything under the sun but won't for chest pain? Geez. Move on to bigger and better things! Sorry you are going through this.
    If I had a nickel for every patient that didn't ring to report chest pain (or other "I need to know about this" type symptoms...).

    My favorite is the patient that reports chest pain long after the fact to the cardiologist during rounds but never let the nurses know about this pain. Fortunately the MDs are familiar with this type of stuff and we never find ourselves in trouble over it. We do give the heads up to the oncoming nurse though to keep an eye out for this stuff.

    I'm wondering who calls a rapid response on a patient and doesn't send someone to find their nurse. (let alone call a rapid response for what turns out to be indigestion?)
  2. 4
    I've been thrown under the bus a few times in my career, too. Once I was three floors down, attending my patient to a V-Q scan (as was required at the time) when the wife of one of my elderly patients decided to force feed him pills. This elderly woman decided, without telling anyone, to give her husband "his meds from home." He was actually pending a bronchoscopy. He immediately chokes and by the time I got back upstairs, they had already wheeled him from my step-down unit, back into ICU. The doctor threw a fit, complained about ME, even tho I wasn't involved, never saw the wife, and certainly didn't condone her giving him any meds! Another time, I was sent home for 2 days for "patient abuse." I got a patient from ICU, with a guaze bandage on her arm. In report, I asked why this arm was wrapped with guaze; the nurse said "I don't know." I documented this. Then I removed the bandage myself, inspected the wound and re-dressed it. Next thing I know, the patient's daughter is saying that I hurt her mother's arm. If they had read my notes, they would have seen that all I did was remove the dressing to see what was under it, since the original nurse was unable to tell me. I actually had that patient all of 30 minutes, until my shift was over. The daughter came in after I had clocked out and went home~ I never even met or saw her! Administration called me 2 days later and said "it was all a mistake and to come back to work." They had never even read my notes, just jumped the gun to blame somebody, so I lost 2 days pay for something I didn't even do! This patient, BTW, was 94 with dementia, and was too confused to know anything. Once someone gets a little authority, they suddenly lose all sense and are ready to blame any nurse they can, doesn't seem to matter.
  3. 4
    I almost got blamed for an order that was missed. The doctor didn't know how to put in orders and didn't tell anyone he didn't know how to put in orders. So instead of asking someone one (myself who happened to be a super user ) how to do it, he put the order in a written note and not even a doctor's note. The hospital got rid of the paper orders and notes. He wrote it on a blank paper and stuck it in the chart that had marked all over it all orders must go into the EMR as this chart is obsolete as far as orders are concerned. So of course it was missed it wasn't in the orders section in the EMR. And yes for a while I did take it upon myself to still check the charts for orders under the orders tab. I would have rather taken a verbal order. He came back the next day ranting and raving about the order. So of course since I was a floater they attempted to reprimand me. Thank goodness I have good negotiation skills and will prove my point until everyone is clear about my view point. Needless to say I didn't get blamed and they sent the doctor to computer class. A class he was actually required to take before using the EMR. He stated that he thought it was beneath him to put in his own orders. A friend of mine told me this when he went to her class. She said he was a piece of work the whole time in class.

    So OP sorry you had to go through this. I would have fought that until I was blue in the face. I get so tired of this blame the nurse mentality.
    martinalpn, DizzyLizzyNurse, netglow, and 1 other like this.
  4. 3
    Quote from DoeRN
    ...He stated that he thought it was beneath him to put in his own orders. A friend of mine told me this when he went to her class. She said he was a piece of work the whole time in class.
    What a tool.
  5. 1
    Quote from applewhitern
    I've been thrown under the bus a few times in my career, too. Once I was three floors down, attending my patient to a V-Q scan (as was required at the time) when the wife of one of my elderly patients decided to force feed him pills. This elderly woman decided, without telling anyone, to give her husband "his meds from home." He was actually pending a bronchoscopy. He immediately chokes and by the time I got back upstairs, they had already wheeled him from my step-down unit, back into ICU. The doctor threw a fit, complained about ME, even tho I wasn't involved, never saw the wife, and certainly didn't condone her giving him any meds! Another time, I was sent home for 2 days for "patient abuse." I got a patient from ICU, with a guaze bandage on her arm. In report, I asked why this arm was wrapped with guaze; the nurse said "I don't know." I documented this. Then I removed the bandage myself, inspected the wound and re-dressed it. Next thing I know, the patient's daughter is saying that I hurt her mother's arm. If they had read my notes, they would have seen that all I did was remove the dressing to see what was under it, since the original nurse was unable to tell me. I actually had that patient all of 30 minutes, until my shift was over. The daughter came in after I had clocked out and went home~ I never even met or saw her! Administration called me 2 days later and said "it was all a mistake and to come back to work." They had never even read my notes, just jumped the gun to blame somebody, so I lost 2 days pay for something I didn't even do! This patient, BTW, was 94 with dementia, and was too confused to know anything. Once someone gets a little authority, they suddenly lose all sense and are ready to blame any nurse they can, doesn't seem to matter.
    Please tell me that at minimum they gave you back pay for those two days.
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.
  6. 0
    Hi, I do not think the director should have told you that you you should resign and that your future looked bleak...this just sounds like she wanted to cover up the issue that the unit was not staffed suffiiciently and that this was putting patient's at risk. However, I am not sure about the chest pain complaint..where you aware that this patient was having chest pain? Or was it just something the patient said as a "rough estimate" of when it began?
  7. 3
    And this is why a Nurses union is a godsend; they just wouldn't be able to get away with this. When understaffed we can submit an assisgnment against objection form basically stating that should any issues occur, complaints, falls, missed meds and all of the OP issues, you have great backup when they pull this crap.
  8. 3
    I would not have resigned. That is for sure. The hospital or floor must have policies regarding ratios and your supervisor should have provided the support. I would have stood my ground. In any case depending on how long you have been a nurse I would apply to other jobs and hospitals. That situation was dangerous and if the hospital does not care enough for its patients and staff accordingly I would not risk my license. As you can see the supervisor made you the scape goat.
  9. 1
    Quote from annmariern
    And this is why a Nurses union is a godsend; they just wouldn't be able to get away with this. When understaffed we can submit an assisgnment against objection form basically stating that should any issues occur, complaints, falls, missed meds and all of the OP issues, you have great backup when they pull this crap.
    Annmariern, I have posted asking questions about unions and gotten little response. Where do you practice? My employer specifically states they are "non-union". I WANT TO LOOK INTO CHANGING THIS.

    I had a fall, which is a "nursing quality indicator." I say it is a staffing quality indicator! I was on three halls (pts all very far apart, and me running all different directions), with HIGH ACUITY pts. My manager recognized the acuity of my pts., so nothing much came of it. Which is my point. The fall would never have happened had staffing levels been adequate. Why are we held to impossible standards?

    I would like to PM you. I would like to learn more about unionizing..
    martinalpn likes this.
  10. 0
    certainly; your inbox is full BTW


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