Was reprimanded and told to resign. Advice or thoughts would be appreciated. - page 3

by nurse20011

13,725 Views | 55 Comments

Hi there, I work on a general medical/surgical floor and had an incident come up the other day. I was given a large patient load without a nurse tech for help. Usually on our unit we have a tech assigned to a nurse if that... Read More


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    I might be missing something, but you don't specifically say that you had not been informed of the patient's chest pain. If you were aware of the chest pain for one hour, I think you need help with prioritization. If you were not, then this whole situation is very unfair.
    jadelpn, Not_A_Hat_Person, and OCNRN63 like this.
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    Quote from Kyrshamarks
    You do not always get unemployment with firing. All the company has to do when the unemployment office calls to verify the reason for firing is to say it wsd negligence of duty, which is what they are calling it by the sounds of it, and unemployment will ne denied.
    And you can challenge them on that front by filing an appeal.
    GrnTea and OCNRN63 like this.
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    Quote from hiddencatRN
    And you can challenge them on that front by filing an appeal.
    But if you're fired for cause they usually won't investigate and you're going that whole time without any income. Sometimes it is better to resign.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
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    Quote from SionainnRN
    But if you're fired for cause they usually won't investigate and you're going that whole time without any income. Sometimes it is better to resign.
    Not true. If you appeal you have the opportunity to present your case at a hearing. They don't simply take the employers word for it if you challenge with an appeal.
    KelRN215, redhead_NURSE98!, and OCNRN63 like this.
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    Not sure what else to add... but that I'm so sorry that happened to you. It's such a tough decision to make, especially since it is usually so time sensitive. I hope that you can take some time off to clear your head after that happened and find a new job that will be a better fit (and better management!!!!)

    It happened to me as well, the "forced" resignation vs. termination. I took the resignation because I wanted to leave on my own terms, didn't wan't that employer to have such power over me, and, in all honesty, I wanted to save my license. It was a horrible place to work, management similar to yours. Always throwing the nurse (especially the new ones) under the bus. Alas, I found a really great job 1 month later, and am now looking back at what never was a great start.
    Last edit by rockstar11 on Jan 1, '13
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
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    Quote from netglow
    Could be that once the patient stated that he had pain for an hour, the switch flipped as far as the corporation goes. Doesn't really matter if the patient never informed anyone of his "pain", or if things were serious. The corporation will throw the nurse in the toilet head first in hopes of avoiding a lawsuit. This is spectacularly stupid - it opens the door for "negotiation" of the guy's bill - no brainer. Lots of people do it. Even if the patient didn't think of this at first, all the scurrying around, and the fact that you were reprimanded out of your job admits guilt on the part of the corporation. Easy-peezy.
    Agreed. SO dumb on the part of the corporation. Especially since it was just indigestion, no harm done.
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    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    I think every nurse needs to put themselves into this scenario and have an idea about what they would do before it happens. I won't tell you you were wrong, because the "right" answer is going to vary for every person. However, I would have made them fire me, complete with thorough documentation of the events, including my rebuttal response.
    Here is what I like about BlueDevil's response: making them fire you, complete with a rebuttal response.

    It is SO EASY to "blame and shame" the nurse who is actually trying to do the work! I find that my charge nurses cannot staff for acuity; they staff by a formula...which is a formula for disaster sometimes!

    If you are toileting six pts. and having to handle pts vomiting and incontinent, pushing narcotics like mad, something has to give! Who do you attend to first? The pt lying in feces, the pt is sickle cell crisis, or the pt with "indigestion"?

    A rapid response called for indigestion was an incorrect rapid response. And leaving you hanging out to dry for indigestion is inexcusable! YOU CANNOT BE TWO PLACES AT ONCE! Period.

    The simple fact is a rapid response should require more that "chest pain". Was the EKG abnormal? Vital signs? Was the pt diaphoretic? Did the report "chest pain"? or something more vague? How long of a period transpired before initial report and assessment? WHAT WAS THE ASSESSMENT? One does not call a rapid response for indigestion, or chest pain, for that matter. You obtain EKG, blood work, contact MD, give NTG, and gather data. In absence of the time to gather all of the above data, you would only call a rapid response if the pt was deteriorating, and you did not know why. Indigestion does not equal deteriorating.
    GrnTea, redhead_NURSE98!, and OCNRN63 like this.
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    For the record, my inclination to "make them fire me" had nothing to do with collecting unemployment benefits. It didn't even occur to me. Rather, I was thinking of my dignity and refusing to admit fault when I did not believe their accusations were fair or accurate. In a scenario such as this, I would feel a resignation under duress was something akin to tacit admission of culpability. Were I in a situation similar to what the OP described, I would never concede that much.

    Again, I am not saying what you did was a wrong move. I can't sit here and say that, I don't know nearly enough about your specific situation to suggest that. I can only point out that all of us would to well to consider how we might behave under similar circumstances so we don't act rashly and make decisions in the heat of the moment that we might regret later.

    In your case OP, what's past is past, and I'm sure better days lie ahead. Best of luck to you.
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    I am sorry too that you lost your job but I also agree with others that itís a good decision that you left your job, knowing that they are not on your side! You may not have grave mistakes in the past right? Why would they advise to terminate you right away? We may not be all perfect as we make mistakes but everybody must be given a chance...What happened may have a little effect on your future employment, but just stay positive=)
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    Quote from hiddencatRN
    Not true. If you appeal you have the opportunity to present your case at a hearing. They don't simply take the employers word for it if you challenge with an appeal.
    I find this topic interesting. I had a friend who was fired. She collected unemployment. The company decided to challenge it, which was done only through phone conversations. No court rooms. My friend ended up having to repay the company for the unemployment she had received. This was in Illinois.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.


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