Removing needle from syringe - page 4

Hello everyone: I'm a Nursing Student and was wondering if anyone had a needle stick after being exposed to a known HIV+ patient. What are the chances of one being infected after such exposure. I... Read More

  1. by   GM1987
    MLOS, he drove by and saw the same tape still stuck to the door handle. The "sharp" was never confirmed but I keep telling him that if, in fact, there was a needle - someone must've noticed it by then. His response - What if' no one did?

    It's a little shocking that some people think this is a "prank." We're obviously trying to get to the bottom of this and have been researching chances of transmission and the only news out there in terms of needle sticks pertains to those in the medical field.
  2. by   TazziRN
    GM, you're a nursing student. You've studied at least one semester's worth, right? What do you think would be the normal reaction from someone who thinks he's been stuck with a dirty needle? Especially if that same person thinks the needle is still there a week later?
  3. by   nurse-to-be1000
    I am not a nurse nor even a student yet but why don't all syringes have safety covers you can push down after use? Are they expensive? What I am talking about I have seen on Depo Lupron shots. I used to give myself a shot once a month and would have to push down on a lever to get the cover down, although occassionally it was tough. I know the syringes I have seen used for allergy shots, insulin, or TB do not have a protective cover.
  4. by   TracyB,RN
    "he drove by and saw the same tape still stuck to the door handle"

    must have been some really big tape...

    i don't think the thread is a prank. i think the "friend" is trying to pull one.
  5. by   GM1987
    Actually, it was some clear masking tape wrapped around in multiple layers. There is only one door to the entrance of the clinic and you can see it when entering the plaza where the clinic is at. Literally, it's about 25 feet away.

    I really doubt my friend is making this up because he is in shock. His family/girlfriend have been calling me to see what's up and I'm lost and don't know what to say...

    You want to say that yes, he might have it due to the 0.3% chance.
    Then, you don't want to say anything so others don't start freaking out as well either...
  6. by   NicInNC
    Why didn't he tell someone at this clinic?

    That would be the FIRST thing that someone should do. If he's so worried, then tell him to cal and talk to them about it. Let them give him the statistics and all. This doesn't make any sense at all.
  7. by   tvccrn
    OK, so this tape was enough the he could see it from the street, driving by, a week later. Now, if this was a case of someone taping a sharp to the front door handle and it's still there A WEEK LATER, don't you think that someone else would have been stuck with it and maybe they would have had the right idea by telling someone on staff at the clinic about it? This leads me to believe that it wasn't a sharp and your "friend" is just making mountains out of molehills.

    The part that I'm having trouble with is that a supposedly responsible adult had this happen to him and didn't take action to ensure that it wouldn't happen to anyone else. The majority of the people would have brought it to the attention of the staff so the potential danger to others could be reoved while an investigation took place.

    tvccrn
  8. by   nicuRN2007
    Quote from nurse-to-be1000
    I am not a nurse nor even a student yet but why don't all syringes have safety covers you can push down after use? Are they expensive? What I am talking about I have seen on Depo Lupron shots. I used to give myself a shot once a month and would have to push down on a lever to get the cover down, although occassionally it was tough. I know the syringes I have seen used for allergy shots, insulin, or TB do not have a protective cover.
    Many syringes don't come with a needle attached so you can choose the correct needle size yourself, or remove the needle to attach the syringe to an IV port. Or you may need one type of needle to pull the drug up, and another type to inject the patient.
  9. by   TazziRN
    Quote from tvccrn
    The part that I'm having trouble with is that a supposedly responsible adult had this happen to him and didn't take action to ensure that it wouldn't happen to anyone else. The majority of the people would have brought it to the attention of the staff so the potential danger to others could be reoved while an investigation took place.

    tvccrn
    My point exactly. GM, you never answered my question above.
  10. by   GM1987
    Yes, a responsible adult would do that but when you're unsure if it actually happened - you're scared to come forward about it. At least, that's what I think happened in this case.
    Maybe anxiety or paranoia is to blame in the following situation but nevertheless, the worst case scenario is often thought of and hence this topic.
  11. by   theofficegirl
    Yes, I've read the entire thread, thinking there was a resolution someplace.

    First of all, OSHA visited us last month, and the chance of HIV from a needlestick was stated as "0.6%". The chances of Hep B/C are greater, but like many of us, I focused on the HIV number - which was foolish, since Hep B/C can be quite deadly as well. This has to be my 24th inservice on the subject, and the numbers keep going up and down... which is annoying.

    Suffice to say, keep your eye on the pointy end.

    Antiretrovirals are toxic, no doubt - but you can bet your bippy that if I get stuck tomorrow, I'll swallow a "cocktail" by days end, and continue therapy - and I'd rather be sick from the ARV regimen than take a chance with the alternative.

    As far as the original post goes - I agree with the admin, and I won't chum the waters any further. Maybe it's my eyesight being 20/30, but I can't see a flyer stuck to my own front door while pulling up in my driveway - so I doubt anyone can see "tape" (silk, paper or micropore?) stuck to a door handle while driving on a perpendicular roadway.
    Last edit by theofficegirl on Feb 28, '07 : Reason: HTML Error
  12. by   DeLana_RN
    Regarding PEP, I would recommend that anyone take it after a needlestick, at least until the source pt has clearly tested negative (which doesn't cover the window period, but since the risk is so low anyway, in general PEP is d/c'd at this time).

    I took Combivir for about a week after a stick with a subq needle and had no side effects whatsoever. Even if I had - or had to take it longer due to HIV+ or unknown source pt - I would have done so. Why take the chance if there is effective PEP?

    DeLana
  13. by   TazziRN
    GM, we're not talking about a responsible adult, we're talking about a normal response, which would have been to immediately try to determine what the sharp object was. If that didn't happen for whatever reason, the next normal response would have been to let the clinic staff know, if not immediately then when the fears started to set in. To panic and only contact a friend who happens to be a nursing student, rather than a physician or HIV/AIDS clinic, makes absolutely no sense.

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