Rediscovering Professionalism in Nursing - page 2

After working 10 years in acute care I became disillusioned, took a job as an office nurse and I am now working in community health. While working on my BSN, I have rekindled that sense of pride and... Read More

  1. by   pickledpepperRN
    Seems that when nurses get burned out they go back to school, work to make things better, change jobs, or quit nursing.
    Constructive solutions it seems to me.
  2. by   txsugarlvn
    JulieLPN and AngelBear, I too feel your pain as an undervalued underappreciated LVN. There is hope at the end of the tunnel! Take heart my sisters in arms...
    Continue going to school. More opportunities, respect, and pay await you. But always always always remember why we are all in this field. The fire does get burned out but when it gets rekindled (as in LauriJo's case) it's incredible. It's going to be okay.
    Fire burns away the impurities revealing the precious...
    Congrats LauriJo...your post is an inspiration for me to keep going to school and focus on what's important. I wish you the best.
  3. by   Edward,IL
    Re: LPN's. LPN's are real nurses and have legal protection to use the title "Licensed Practcal Nurse" via their State Board of Nursing.
    They have attempted to learn in 1 year what most of us take 4 to 8 years to learn.
    Most LPN's I've spoken with over the years have stated that they chose this particular entry into practice so that they could be at the bedside taking care of patient's, and that they had no interest in pursuing an administrative position.
    Unfortunately, reality shock for LPN's csan be more severe than for RN's. Two weeks after getting their Board results back, they find themselves in the role of THE licensed professional responsible for up to 50 patients in a LTC facility. With the assistance of a couple of overworked CNA's and and a semi-conscious administrator/DON, I can easily see why one might become disillusioned. My suggestion is to go for that next degree. It is much more difficult to exploit/abuse a well-educ acted nurse, and as was testified on this post, formal higher education opens up a whole lot of doors for you.
    Just my thoughts, Edward, IL
  4. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Originally posted by UntamedSpirit
    ..... But I think the disillusionment hinges on over worked and understaffed, unsafe conditions. My heart goes out to the LPNs that are responding here, saying that they are disillusioned and not respected.....
    I am an RN (ADN) and I have to say that I am very disillusioned, and feel disrespected, too. You are right about the working conditions. There are many employers out there for me, but each new situation is just as bad, if not worse than the last.

    I want to be able to give the best care possible and to remain at the bedside. But with staffing ratios and working conditions being what they are, I don't think it will happen for me.

    I am thinking of going back to get a BS in public health or in biology.

    Maybe I will be able to make a contribution and find tolerable working conditions by altering my path from nursing.
  5. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Originally posted by Edward,IL
    Re: LPN's. LPN's are real nurses and have legal protection to use the title "Licensed Practcal Nurse" via their State Board of Nursing.
    They have attempted to learn in 1 year what most of us take 4 to 8 years to learn.
    Most LPN's I've spoken with over the years have stated that they chose this particular entry into practice so that they could be at the bedside taking care of patient's, and that they had no interest in pursuing an administrative position.
    Unfortunately, reality shock for LPN's csan be more severe than for RN's. Two weeks after getting their Board results back, they find themselves in the role of THE licensed professional responsible for up to 50 patients in a LTC facility. With the assistance of a couple of overworked CNA's and and a semi-conscious administrator/DON, I can easily see why one might become disillusioned. My suggestion is to go for that next degree. It is much more difficult to exploit/abuse a well-educ acted nurse, and as was testified on this post, formal higher education opens up a whole lot of doors for you.
    Just my thoughts, Edward, IL

    Edward, great post.

    However, I was the only LPN for 65 pts, and when I got my RN, it remained the same. Except that it now cost them $5. more per hr to exploit me.

  6. by   Edward,IL
    I've found private duty/home care to be a very satisfying work environment.

    > Nurse to patient ratio is always 1:1

    > Per hour pay rate is usually comparable to other employment. Working part-time for two or more agencies gives a high degree of flexibility re scheduling.
    If you work an eight hour shift and are asked to work an additional 4 hours, you won't mind working the extra time.
    It's a good idea to have your own private health insurance policy and IRA. It's well worth it in terms of the independence (not dependent on an employer for benefits).
    > I've worked with alot of very good LPN's on homecare cases (peds and adults). They, too, find it much more professionally rewarding than working in an institution.
    Just my thoughts, Edward, IL
  7. by   momoftriplets
    This is a good thread. I have been a nurse for about 12 years, I started out as an LPN and finished my RN and am now getting my BSN. (I still think my best educational experience was with my LPN) I have been greatly disillusioned myself recently in trying to figure out what I want to do. Basically, I want to be a nurse and help people, but that is hard when the patients don't want to learn or help themselves (with anything!!) I have found that going back to school is very enlightening and inspirational and has given me back a good feeling about nursing. I don't know what I will do with my BSN, but I can tell you now I will get my MSN. Not so much for the opportunities, but for the internal satisfaction I get with learning. There is power through education and maybe that is the only way to feel appreciated as a nurse

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