RE: Relocation- Tips On What Makes a Standout Nursing Applicant!

  1. 0
    Hi, I plan on relocating as soon as I graduate with my BSN from St. Louis, MO.

    Just wanted to know what are some tips on those stand-out "WOW" factors that would at the very least put you in the running for a potential candidate?

    I realize that while being a new RN grad, you wont be able to command much from anyone, so at the very least would signing up for a CNA or PCT job at any pay, and pretty much at any place (nursing home) whatsoever be one of the best options to consider?

    I figure that with me already beginning to work as a CNA/PCT for 3 years until I graduate as an RN, and still being willing to work the humble minimum-wage entry-level jobs would be the best tactic for someone for someone whom already went through the schooling and has the experience on top of it.
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  3. 13 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    When I am screening applications and interviewing it is hard to define what makes someone 'great', but I can tell you what absolutely will keep you from being interviewed/hired:
    1. Bad grammar or typos. I will not interview anyone with these on their application or resume- it shows a lack of attention to detail.
    2. Being late to an interview- actually just interviewed 2 great candidates and one got the job because she was on time.
    3. Speaking softly- this seems strange, but it happens a lot. Speak up and talk with confidence. Make sure your resume rings with confidence also. If you don't believe in yourself, why should I?
    4. We often ask applicants to describe a time they broke the rules to do what was best for the pt- do not answer with something that is unethical or illegal.

    That sums up the things off the top of my head that keep people from being hired. I would really highlight your strengths, your clinical experience, use your preceptor as a reference if possible. Be open and flexible, including filling in as a CNA, although it raises questions when I see a nurse who graduated, but has only been working as a CNA. Even if you can not get a job, become really active with the nurse association in the city or state. Network as much as possible. Good luck!
    fmiller007 likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from ErinS
    When I am screening applications and interviewing it is hard to define what makes someone 'great', but I can tell you what absolutely will keep you from being interviewed/hired:
    1. Bad grammar or typos. I will not interview anyone with these on their application or resume- it shows a lack of attention to detail.
    2. Being late to an interview- actually just interviewed 2 great candidates and one got the job because she was on time.
    3. Speaking softly- this seems strange, but it happens a lot. Speak up and talk with confidence. Make sure your resume rings with confidence also. If you don't believe in yourself, why should I?
    4. We often ask applicants to describe a time they broke the rules to do what was best for the pt- do not answer with something that is unethical or illegal.

    That sums up the things off the top of my head that keep people from being hired. I would really highlight your strengths, your clinical experience, use your preceptor as a reference if possible. Be open and flexible, including filling in as a CNA, although it raises questions when I see a nurse who graduated, but has only been working as a CNA. Even if you can not get a job, become really active with the nurse association in the city or state. Network as much as possible. Good luck!
    Thank you ErinS! Excellent post.

    About the highlighted portion, what suppose do you think would look better if someone were a newly graduate but due to the market being tight-- couldnt grab hold of a RN job as soon as they liked. Is there something a step up from a CNA that would fare just a BIT better on a resume?

    Thanks
  6. 1
    Quote from ErinS
    \
    4. We often ask applicants to describe a time they broke the rules to do what was best for the pt- do not answer with something that is unethical or illegal.
    Sorry to get off topic, but what would be an acceptable answer? I cannot for the life of me think of one... Not saying there are not ones out there but
    Last edit by BrazoriaLVN on Aug 12, '11 : Reason: quote
    LaughingRN likes this.
  7. 1
    Perhaps I can answer that last question. I work LTC, and my main priority is to act as an advocate for my residents. It is important to provide them with a decent quality of life in their last months and days. We have a doctor who frequently neglects his residents, and he is disrespectful to the nurses. This is an ongoing issue, and I am now coming close to the one year mark as a nurse.

    He complained to my manager, saying I call him late at night for orders that could wait. This is a lie. I outlined for my manager all the instances where he was called, which were priority calls. She understood. Furthermore, I also made it known that I have a responsibility to these people, and I care about their health. I could care less about being popular. As long as I am respectful and I have a clear rationale for my actions, the doctor needs to do his job. That is that, and I have certain values which I will continue to uphold, regardless of the flak I might receive from a doctor.

    At the end of the day, if something should happen, it's my license on the line. We can read all the codes of ethics and attend seminars about patient care, but if we aren't willing to advocate for the vulnerable, it means nothing.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  8. 0
    a time i broke the rule that wasnt illegal, was when my patient was depressed and the only thing that cheered him up was going to sport games, rule says you cant take patient but then if thats the only thing that sheers him up and the games are in the afternoon, i took him anyways on the bus. at the end of the day it always made him cheer up and he would be nicer to the staff and family (This was home health) and they all appreciated it.
  9. 0
    Quote from ErinS
    4. We often ask applicants to describe a time they broke the rules to do what was best for the pt- do not answer with something that is unethical or illegal.

    !
    This is a catch. Rules are put in place for a reason. In my way of thinking, breaking the rules means going against. So how does ont break the rules without being illegal?

    I have a mirror and I break it, it's in pieces and not the same again. I break the rules- I did not bend it, I broke it, I did something opposite to the intended then.
  10. 2
    Quote from fmiller007
    hi, i plan on relocating as soon as i graduate with my bsn from st. louis, mo.

    just wanted to know what are some tips on those stand-out "wow" factors that would at the very least put you in the running for a potential candidate?

    i realize that while being a new rn grad, you wont be able to command much from anyone, so at the very least would signing up for a cna or pct job at any pay, and pretty much at any place (nursing home) whatsoever be one of the best options to consider?

    i figure that with me already beginning to work as a cna/pct for 3 years until i graduate as an rn, and still being willing to work the humble minimum-wage entry-level jobs would be the best tactic for someone for someone whom already went through the schooling and has the experience on top of it.
    just in case you are not aware, if you have an rn license and you accept a cna job, you will be held accountable for the rn level of care. this puts your license at great risk if you work under your level because you will not get rn experience or pay but you must treat your patients at the rn level. i would strongly recommend against it.
    joanna73 and fmiller007 like this.
  11. 1
    Quote from Katie5
    This is a catch. Rules are put in place for a reason. In my way of thinking, breaking the rules means going against. So how does ont break the rules without being illegal?

    I have a mirror and I break it, it's in pieces and not the same again. I break the rules- I did not bend it, I broke it, I did something opposite to the intended then.

    Not always is breaking a rule illegal. When I worked in LTC, there was a rule that the residents were not allowed to smoke cigarettes after 1900. Several times I would take a resident out for a "smoke break" if they couldn't sleep, were cranky, or on the verge of acting out. I could always tell when the acting out was going to become a incident. It made more sense to me to get them a cigarette and take them outside than have to deal w/ an incident.
    Last edit by Hospice Nurse LPN on Aug 13, '11 : Reason: typo
    Fiona59 likes this.
  12. 4
    Quote from Katie5
    This is a catch. Rules are put in place for a reason. In my way of thinking, breaking the rules means going against. So how does ont break the rules without being illegal?

    I have a mirror and I break it, it's in pieces and not the same again. I break the rules- I did not bend it, I broke it, I did something opposite to the intended then.
    Is using nurse discretion and having 4 visitors in the room instead of the allowed 2 (just an example) illegal?

    What if PICU policy says no food is allowed in the rooms for parents and visitors? What if the child is critical, does better with mom and dad in the room and parents haven't eaten all day? Would it be illegal to allow them to eat their sandwich and chips or cereal in the room? Such a small gesture helps the patient, the parents, and (potentially) makes the nurses life easier as well.

    By no means am I going around being a rule breaker, but I can think of several instances where I used my own judgement despite what 'policy' said.
    jessica.k.h, Fiona59, joanna73, and 1 other like this.


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